News: News Releases

  1. Ohio's grape and wine industry accounts for $800 million a year in economic activity.

    Ohio Grape and Wine Conference Is Feb. 15-16 in Dublin

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — The 2016 Ohio Grape and Wine Conference will be held Feb. 15-16 in Dublin, Ohio, featuring a number of experts from around the country who will cover key topics for the industry — including fruit quality, winemaking and product branding practices, and spring frost protection. The conference is being jointly organized by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University, the Ohio Grape Industries Committee, and the Ohio Wine Producers Association. It will be held at the Embassy Suites Columbus-Dublin, 5100 Upper Metro Place, Dublin. Full conference registration costs $225. There are additional options for partial registration. For complete registration information, visit go.osu.edu/BKps. “This year’s...
  2. Chow Line: More fiber: Just what the doctor ordered

    I know it’s important to get enough fiber to help with constipation, but I’ve also read that it can help prevent disease. How does that work?   New research is coming out all the time about the health benefits of a high-fiber diet, and you’re right, they go way beyond helping to keep you “regular.” Unfortunately, most Americans consume only about 10 to 15 grams of fiber a day. The recommendation for adults under 50 is 25 grams a day for women and 38 grams for men. Those over 50 should get 25 grams a day for women and 30 for men — still much higher than the average. Studies have long associated high-fiber diets with a reduced risk of heart disease and diabetes, but two recent studies show even more benefits: A Harvard University study...
  3. Photo: Thinkstock

    Conservation Tillage Conference March 2-3 Offers Tips for Farmers in Tight Economy

    ADA, Ohio – High input costs coupled with low grain prices anticipated in 2016 means that growers have to make smarter, calculated choices to grow profitable crops this year. Also important is the need to build and maintain healthy soils to help ensure good water quality, said Randall Reeder, a retired Ohio State University Extension agricultural engineer. Reeder is an organizer of the annual Conservation Tillage Conference offered March 2-3 by The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and is organized by Ohio State University Extension, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, with assistance from our partners at the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Soil and Water Conservation Districts of Northwest Ohio. OSU Extension...
  4. Media Advisory: Conservation Scientist to Speak at Ohio State Feb. 11

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — M. Sanjayan, executive vice president and senior scientist with Conservation International, will give a free public talk, “Earth and People: Lessons in Living Together,” to more than 1,500 people — including students, faculty and staff from The Ohio State University and members of the surrounding community — at 7 p.m. Feb. 11 in the Ohio Union on Ohio State’s campus in Columbus. Reporters are welcome to attend. Sanjayan will be available for media interviews starting at 4:15 p.m. Contact Molly Bean at 614-688-8798 or bean.21@osu.edu to make arrangements. Columbus Zoo and Aquarium CEO Tom Stalf will give the event’s opening remarks. He’ll share highlights of central Ohio’s contributions to protecting Earth’...
  5. How Good Nutrition Can Combat Effects of Lead in Water

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Children are especially susceptible to the dangers of ingesting lead from drinking water or any other source, says a registered dietitian nutritionist with Ohio State University Extension. But parents can help limit the health impact by making sure their children eat a well-balanced diet, especially that they get enough calcium, iron and vitamin C.  “The best defense against lead for anyone is a healthy lifestyle,” said Pat Bebo, leader of OSU Extension’s Community Nutrition Program and interim assistant director in charge of Extension’s Family and Consumer Science programs. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. “But it’s especially...
  6. Photo: Thinkstock

    Demand for Goat Meat on the Rise in Ohio: Conference Offers Training on Meat Goat Production

    WILMINGTON, Ohio – The demand for goat meat is on the rise across the Buckeye state, creating a strong market for producers who are able to supply consumers with the specialty meat. “The demand for goat meat is tremendous across Ohio and in neighboring states,” said Tony Nye, an Ohio State University Extension educator who coordinates OSU Extension’s Small Farm Program. “Thanks to the dietary preferences of many ethnic, religious, and health-conscious groups across the region, the demand for goat meat is thriving right now, with all indications that the demand will continue to skyrocket. “Prior to 2000, the majority of goats produced in Ohio were dairy-based,” he said. “At this point, the demand for goat meat is outweighing the supply as...
  7. Aedes aegypti is the main vector that carries Zika virus. (ThinkStock photo)

    Media Advisory: Zika Virus: Ohio State Expert Available to Speak about Mosquitoes that Carry Disease

    WOOSTER, Ohio — Peter Piermarini, an entomologist with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University, is available to speak with the media about the mosquitoes that transmit Zika virus, which is now present throughout Latin America and has also infected more than 30 people in the U.S. who contracted the disease while traveling abroad. In Brazil, Zika virus has been linked to cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome, pregnant women giving birth to babies with birth defects and poor pregnancy outcomes, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Zika virus is transmitted by species of Aedes mosquitoes, but Aedes aegypti appears to be the most efficient,” said Piermarini, an expert on disease-transmitting...
  8. At Least 4 Good Reasons to Boost Soil Organic Matter, and a Chance to Learn How to Do It

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — The key to successful, sustainable farming is found in the ground — or should be, says soil scientist Rafiq Islam of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. “Soil organic matter is the cornerstone of soil health,” said Islam, a member of a regional research team that’s spent the past 15 years studying soil organic matter, its benefits to crops and the best ways to boost it on farms run organically. “As with any agricultural production system, maintaining a healthy and productive soil is the foundation of sustainable organic farming,” he said. On Feb. 12, Islam and other team members will share their findings in “The Dirt on Organic Matter.” It’s a special...
  9. faucet

    Concerned About Lead in Water? Here Are Steps You Can Take

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — If you’re concerned that your tap water might have elevated levels of lead in it, the first place to start is with your community’s water system, said a water quality specialist with The Ohio State University. “Public water systems in the U.S. have to provide safe drinking water not just as it leaves the water treatment plant, but throughout the distribution system and a home’s plumbing,” said Karen Mancl, a professor in the Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering and specialist with Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.  Mancl has been following reports about the situation in Flint, Michigan, where lead...
  10. Stay involved to help children with school

    Our oldest child started middle school last fall. She was struggling early in the year but didn’t want help, and we hoped she would get used to the new schedule and classes. She still seems unorganized and isn’t doing as well as she did in grade school. What can we do to help her over this bump? As children grow, it can be difficult to gauge how to balance providing support while also fostering their independence. While it’s important to take cues from your daughter, it’s also important to remain involved in her life and help her out when you see the need. It can be hard to figure out how best to do that during different stages of development. But one resource you may find helpful is the “Helping Your Child Series” on the U.S. Department of Education...

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