News: News Releases

  1. buttered bread falling with plate to the floor

    Chow Line: Study: It’s best not to test five-second rule

    So, I keep hearing different things about the five-second rule. Is it OK to pick up food and eat it after it has dropped to the floor? Um, no. It’s not OK. At least not if you’re concerned about the potential for foodborne illness. Your confusion is understandable, though. Just a few years ago, a researcher at Aston University in the United Kingdom announced that the five-second rule was really a thing. The professor led his final-year biology students in a study examining whether bacteria would contaminate different types of foods when they were dropped onto different floor types and left for different times — from three to 30 seconds. They found that time is a significant factor in the transfer of bacteria to a piece of food, and that the type of flooring also has a...
  2. Eastern Ohio Ag Station Holding Field Day, 50-Year Celebration Sunday

    CALDWELL, Ohio — The Eastern Agricultural Research Station in Noble County will celebrate its past, present and future this Sunday. The station, which is part of the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, is holding a rededication ceremony and field day in honor of its 50th anniversary. Hours are 2 to 5 p.m. Admission is free and open to the public. The station is at 16870 Bond Ridge Road (Township Road 126) near Caldwell, about 2 miles east of Belle Valley and about 100 miles east of Columbus. The rededication program starts at 2 p.m. Afterward, wagons will take attendees on tours of the station’s grounds and facilities. During the tours, experts from OARDC and Ohio State University Extension will talk about the station’s research on grazing and forage...
  3. Secrest Arboretum’s Fall Plant Sale Is Saturday

    WOOSTER, Ohio — Secrest Arboretum is holding its annual Autumn Discovery Day fundraising plant sale from 9 a.m. to noon this Saturday. Featured will be more than 100 different types of trees and shrubs, many of them unusual or hard to find commercially. Admission is free and open to the public. There’s also a presale for members of the Friends of Secrest Arboretum from 3 to 4 p.m. this Friday. The arboretum is at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave. in Wooster, about 60 miles south of Cleveland. The center is part of The Ohio State University and its College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The event is the arboretum’s second-biggest fundraiser of the year, said Paul Snyder, who works there as a program assistant...
  4. Ohio State Hosting Talks on Famous Grizzly Bear, Ted Turner’s Green Impact in West

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Two special events at The Ohio State University will look at two big personalities — a famous grizzly bear and media mogul turned environmentalist Ted Turner, an Ohio native — and the mark they’re making on the American West. The Ohio State-based Environmental Professionals Network, a service of the School of Environment and Natural Resources, is hosting both events. The school is in the university’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. On Oct. 24 at 7 p.m., photographer Thomas Mangelsen and writer Todd Wilkinson will present “An Evening with Grizzly Bear 399,” a photo-rich talk based on their book Grizzlies of Pilgrim Creek. The book’s star is Grizzly 399, a female grizzly bear living in...
  5. grandmother with grandchild slicing an apple

    Chow Line: Kids not eating fruit? Try cutting, slicing it

    How can I get my grandchildren to eat more fruits and vegetables when they’re visiting? I am lucky that I get to have them over often, but I can’t seem to entice them to eat much produce. You’re not alone. Most children (and teens and adults for that matter) don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables, according to data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. But for kids, you might try thinking small. That is, if you don’t already, try slicing fruits and vegetables into bite-size pieces. You might be surprised at the results. Research by the Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University indicates that slicing fruit could increase consumption, at least in school cafeterias. You might find similar success at home. For the study, published in 2013 in the American...
  6. Farm Science Review. Photo: FSR.

    Good Weather, Innovation Drive Farm Science Review Attendance

    LONDON, Ohio – Sunny skies and warm temperatures ushered in strong attendance at the annual Farm Science Review held Sept. 20-22 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center near London, Ohio, which saw some 125,790 visitors over its three-day run. Sponsored by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University, the Review offered farmers and growers a wonderful opportunity to learn about the latest agricultural research and innovation, said Matt Sullivan, superintendent of the Molly Caren center. Some 24,200 visitors attended the show Thursday (9/22), with 46,680 in attendance for Tuesday’s (9/20) opening day, while Wednesday (9/21) was the highest-attended day with 54,910 visitors, he said. “When you look at the overall Farm Science...
  7. image of cafeteria tray with apple, salad, vegetables

    Ohio Farm to School Workshops Set for October, November

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — When it comes to the school cafeteria, it’s not often that “farm-fresh food” comes to mind. But there’s no reason why it shouldn’t, said Carol Smathers, Ohio Farm to School coordinator for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The benefits stretch beyond fresh fare on the lunch plate, Smathers said. Farm to School programs, which connect local farms with educational institutions, provide opportunities for students to learn more about agriculture and local foods while also strengthening local food systems, she said. To help spread the word and potentially expand Farm to School programs throughout the state, the...
  8. OARDC Dedicates New Art, Renovated Campus Entrance

    WOOSTER, Ohio — Science met art Sept. 16 when Wooster’s Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center dedicated a new sculpture and water feature at its renovated campus entrance. The event took place six years to the day after a tornado entered the campus at nearly the very same spot, causing millions of dollars in damage to greenhouses, buildings and trees but fortunately no injuries. Called “The Fruit of Inquiry,” the sculpture was done by Gallipolis artist Kevin Lyles, who’s a professor of sculpture at the University of Rio Grande in southeast Ohio. It features small fountains, 15 tons of glacial stone symbolizing Ohio’s soil and fields, large open cubes made from gleaming metal rods evoking streams and flowing water, and some 70 bronze...
  9. holding hands on gut, intestinal problems

    Chow Line: Restrictive diet can help ease intestinal issues

    I have a friend who no longer eats wheat products, onions, garlic or a lot of other foods. She said it’s because she has been experiencing stomach problems and a “low-FODMAP” diet was recommended. It sounds serious. What is it? FODMAP is an acronym used for foods containing certain carbohydrates that aren’t absorbed well in the intestines and can be rapidly fermented in the gut. In some people, they cause gas, bloating, abdominal pain, excess fluid, constipation and diarrhea. The acronym stands for fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols — a mouthful, which is why you will hear the term “FODMAPs” a lot more often than the actual words it stands for. The low-FODMAP diet was developed in the last 10 years by...
  10. girl holding plant

    School Gardens ‘Magical’: Conference Oct. 7

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — A school garden can be a magical place for kids, says Sue Hogan. “Especially if they don’t live in the best environment, it can be peaceful, interesting and exciting — an alternative to their everyday life.” That’s one reason why Hogan, a 4-H educator for Ohio State University Extension, is coordinating the fourth annual Ohio School Garden Conference, whose theme is “Getting Back to Our Roots.” The event will be held 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Oct. 7 at The Ohio State University’s Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, 2201 Fred Taylor Drive, on the Columbus campus. The idea is to help teachers, administrators, after-school program personnel and interested community members start and maintain school gardens, which...

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