News: News Releases

  1. girl watching tv with remote and a bowl of popcorn

    Chow Line: Pack kids’ snacks with nutrients, variety

    I know my kids eat too many cookies and chips. What are some healthier snack options for kids? Thirty years ago, children ate, on average, one snack a day. Today, they average three snacks a day, and some experts point to that increase as being at least partly responsible for the rise in childhood obesity rates over the years. Cutting back on snacking could be a good idea for both children and adults alike. But eliminating children’s snacking altogether can be an impossible task for parents. Your idea to emphasize healthful snacks is a good one. And it could have huge nutritional payoffs. As you think about what might be satisfactory replacements (in your children’s eyes) for chips and baked goods, you might consider providing options — sort of a combo plate. That...
  2. Ohio State Seeks Participants for Study on Consumer Eating Habits, Free Lunch Included

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — With today’s varied food and beverage marketplace, recent research shows that Americans are altering their diets at increasing rates, causing food and beverage companies to try to keep pace. “While we all know the saying, ‘We are what we eat,’ it is also important to link our own eating and food handling decisions with issues being faced by society today,” said Brian Roe, a professor of agricultural economics in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. Roe and his colleagues are seeking participants to travel to Ohio State’s Columbus campus to engage in a 15-minute study on consumer eating habits and food handling behavior. Participants, who must be at least 18 years old, will...
  3. insect on hand

    Media Advisory: First-ever ‘Engaging with Insects’ Ohio 4-H Camp Is June 27-July 1

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Something will be bugging about a dozen kids next week as they attend the first-ever “Engaging with Insects” summer day camp at The Ohio State University. During the week, the kids will learn about termites, mealworms and honeybees; dissect grasshoppers; and trap, identify and mount insects to build their own collection. The camp’s base will be in and around the university’s Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, 2201 Fred Taylor Drive, Columbus. Field trips to other locations on campus are planned on Tuesday and Thursday mornings to observe honey bees, explore a greenhouse insectary and visit the insect collection at the university’s Museum of Biological Diversity. Leading the camp will be Norman Johnson, professor with joint...
  4. How to Help Soils, Crops and Water, and Also Deal with Climate: July 28 Field Night

    PIKETON, Ohio — The July 28 Soil, Water and Bioenergy Field Night at the Ohio State University South Centers in Piketon will feature new and innovative ways to grow soybeans, corn and wheat in a changing climate. Growing cover crops, practicing long-term no-till and spreading gypsum on the soil — all of which offer the triple benefit of better soil health, crop yields and water quality — also are on the agenda. The topics at the event will “help farmers make knowledgeable decisions about best management practices that provide long-term economic and environmental benefits,” said Rafiq Islam, soil and bioenergy program leader at the centers. The centers are part of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State...
  5. Hey, Ohio: Get a Handy New Guide to the Bees in Your Garden

    Editor: June 20-26 is National Pollinator Week. WOOSTER, Ohio — Ohio’s bees are more than honey bees. They’re bumble bees, carpenter bees, cuckoo bees and others, and you can identify more than a dozen of them — types you’re likely to see in your garden — using a new pocket card from The Ohio State University. It’s just in time for National Pollinator Week, June 20-26, which is meant to raise awareness of pollinators — bees and their buddies — and the good they do for your yard, your food and in nature. “Bees are essential pollinators,” said the card’s developer, Denise Ellsworth, who’s the program director of the Honey Bee and Native Pollinator Education Program in Ohio State’s College of Food,...
  6. penny half-buried in soil

    Communication, Management Key During Tough Financial Times on Farm

    WOOSTER, Ohio — Lower income and higher expenses are putting a financial squeeze on some farmers this year. “Financial stress is definitely happening in the farm community,” said Rory Lewandowski, agriculture and natural resources educator for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. “Some farms that haven’t had to take out an operating loan for short-term credit in years are having to do so this year,” he said. “We’re seeing the dairy sector suffering the most right now, but some crop farmers as well. There are definitely signs of tougher financial times and struggle.” In times like these, open communication with...
  7. The impact of field crops on bees can be both negative and positive, according to new research. (Photo: Thinkstock)

    Field Crops and Bees: Research Shows Surprising Relationships, Need for Better Management

    WOOSTER, Ohio — Honeybees are negatively impacted by the insecticide-coated seeds of some field crops, yet they also seem to benefit from the presence of other field crops in the vicinity of their hives, according to research conducted by entomologists with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. “Most corn seeds planted today are coated with insecticides. During the planting process, some of that coating is chipped off and the dust is released into the air and also lands on nearby flowers and trees,” said Reed Johnson, an assistant professor in the Department of Entomology. Honeybees and other pollinators are crucial to agriculture and food security. They pollinate about one-third of the crops we eat, valued at more...
  8. Get ‘Ideas You Can Put to Use’ on Sustainable Ag Team Tours

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Organizers say it’s about innovation. Starting in August, the Sustainable Agriculture Team at The Ohio State University will present 10 tours of Ohio farms to spotlight new crops and methods. “It’s an opportunity for participants to kick the tires on other farm operations and see how other folks are addressing sustainability issues,” said Mike Hogan, who’s a co-organizer of the series and a member of the team. The free tours will feature topics including hops, grapes, high tunnels, organic farming, direct selling to consumers and farm to school programs. Urban farming will be a special focus. The lineup is part of the wider Ohio Sustainable Farm Tour and Workshop Series, which the team is co-presenting with five other...
  9. Malting barley. (Thinkstock)

    Time of Planting, Availability of Herbicides Key Issues for Spring Barley Weed Control

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Researchers with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University are conducting studies to determine the best weed control strategies for spring barley, a crop that is now getting more attention from farmers due to growth of the craft beer industry in Ohio and neighboring states. “We are currently in our first year of research to determine the safest and most effective herbicide programs for spring barley in Ohio,” said Mark Loux, an Ohio State University Extension weed specialist. OSU Extension is the statewide outreach arm of the college. “Summer annual weeds such as ragweeds, lambsquarters, pigweeds and foxtails are the primary weed problem in spring-planted crops, and the competitiveness of the crop...
  10. Experts’ Guide to Exploring Your Woods: July 15 in Mansfield

    MANSFIELD, Ohio — Take time this summer to get to know the woods in your own backyard. So says Kathy Smith, forestry program director in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University, who’s helping teach a workshop that will help you do just that. “The Woods in Your Backyard” is from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 15 in 025 Ovalwood Hall on Ohio State’s Mansfield campus, 1760 University Drive. The campus is about 70 miles north of Columbus and 80 miles south of Cleveland. The workshop is “for landowners who have a small section of woods out back that they want to learn more about,” said Smith, who leads the college’s Ohio Woodland Stewards Program. The program is the event’s sponsor. Indoor,...

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