News: News Releases

  1. OARDC’s Crabapple Trees Should Hit Peak Bloom This Weekend

    WOOSTER, Ohio — The crabapple trees have started blooming at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster. They should be at their finest for Mother’s Day weekend, May 9-10. “With the expected warmer temperatures this week, this weekend will be the peak bloom,” said Joe Cochran, interim director of the center’s Secrest Arboretum. The 115-acre arboretum and surrounding OARDC campus are home to more than 600 crabapple trees of more than 150 cultivars. Together they form the largest crabapple tree collection in the U.S., Cochran said. Included in that total are more than 100 new crabapple trees planted since a tornado hit part of the campus and arboretum in 2010, leveling 1,500 trees, including 150 crabapples. Cold as it was, the trees...
  2. Ohio State Offers Strawberry Field Night May 21

    PIKETON, Ohio – Robotic strawberry pickers on the farm? Researchers in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University are testing a new prototype robotic sensor technology that can assist farmers in strawberry production, potentially saving growers up to $10,000 per acre in labor harvesting costs. Although researchers at Ohio State are still testing this new technology to determine if it is economically feasible for farmers to adopt, it could be a significant boost to strawberry farmers, said Brad Bergefurd, a horticulturist with Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. “The potential benefit for using technology like this is significant in reducing labor costs and increasing farm...
  3. Soybean. Photo: Thinkstock

    OSU Expert: Check for Potential Cold Snap Injury in Wheat

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Now is the time for growers to check their wheat crops to see if the recent cold snap that hit the region last month has injured susceptible plants, a field crops expert in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University said. With temperature that hit near or below freezing during the week of April 20 in some parts of Ohio, wheat growers in affected areas may consider checking their crops for potential injury, said Laura Lindsey, a soybean and small grains specialist with Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the college’s outreach arm. Depending on the wheat’s growth stage and how cold the temperatures were, some plants could have been negatively impacted by the freeze, Lindsey said, noting that...
  4. Chadwick Arboretum’s Plant Sale Is May 8-9

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — A buckeye tree with deep-scarlet flowers, sure to appeal to diehard Ohio State fans, is one of the more than 650 uncommon plant types available at Chadwick Arboretum’s May 8-9 spring plant sale and auction. The 62-acre public arboretum is on the grounds of The Ohio State University. The school’s colors, of course, are scarlet and gray. The sale and auction are a main fundraiser for the arboretum, which is part of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Offered will be trees, shrubs, herbs, annuals, perennials, vegetables, hanging baskets, garden art, Mother’s Day gifts and more. Find a complete plant list at go.osu.edu/2015ChadwickList. Ohio State Scarlet buckeye trees will be the first plants offered in both days’...
  5. Late Planting Start May Call for Adjusting Management Practices for Corn

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Thanks to cooler, wet weather in April that has caused spring planting delays across the region, growers may need to adjust some of their management practices when they are able to get into their fields to speed up crop establishment, said an agronomist with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. Across Ohio, as of the week ending April 26, only 2 percent of corn was planted, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. That compares to 3 percent that had been planted by the same time last year and 20 percent that had been planted on average during the same time period over the past five years, the agency said. The concern for many growers is that delayed...
  6. Cereal Rye

    Cover Crops Are Viable Option for Livestock Supplemental Feed

    WOOSTER, Ohio — Producers who want to use the cover crops they planted last fall as supplemental feed for their livestock may want to may want to harvest these crops quickly before the plants get too mature and the feed quality declines, says a forage expert from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.  So says Rory Lewandowski, agriculture and natural resources educator for the college’s outreach arm, Ohio State University Extension. Although cover crops are typically planted to control erosion and improve soil structure and health, they can also be a good option as supplemental forage for livestock, he said. “There are a number of dairy farmers who take a cutting off of cover crops that are planted in the...
  7. Chow Line: A tried-and-true DIY ‘detox’ diet

    I’ve seen a lot of different versions of “detox” diets. Which type might work best to help me shed a few pounds this spring? “Detox” and similar diets have been around for ages. As early as the 1930s, the grapefruit diet promised quick weight loss because of some sort of fat-burning enzymes, which simply don’t exist. Today, many detox diets focus on juicing or eliminating entire food groups and promise to help you burn fat, boost metabolism, improve digestion and (almost always) lose weight. However, there seems to be no consensus about what a detox diet really consists of, or what it is that you need to detoxify out of your body that your liver, kidney and colon don’t already eliminate. That said, spring is always a good time to recharge your...
  8. coins and graduation cap

    Family Fundamentals: Investigate options to repay student loans

    I am about to graduate from college and, so far, I don’t have a job. I’m worried about paying back my student loans when the time comes. What happens if I can’t afford the payment? With any type of debt, it’s important to understand the terms of payment and what to do as soon as you fear you can’t keep up. It’s a good sign that you’re thinking of this now. Too many people avoid the issue. If they don’t have the money, they just miss payments and become delinquent, costing them not only financially in late fees, additional interest and penalties, but in increased stress and anxiety. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York recently issued “Student Loan Borrowing and Repayment Trends, 2015,” which reported that only 37 percent of...
  9. Cold Weather Spring Planting Delays Typical in Ohio

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – While cold weather and cool soil temperatures have made many Ohio corn fields unsuitable yet for spring planting, growers who haven’t begun planting shouldn’t worry because there’s still time to plant and expect good yields, said an agronomist with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. According to historical corn planting data for the past 15 years, less than 10 percent of Ohio corn has typically been planted by April 15, said Peter Thomison, an Ohio State University Extension agronomist. OSU Extension is the statewide outreach arm of the college. Instead, an average of about 2 percent has typically been planted statewide by April 15, he said. “Historically, the percentage of corn...
  10. Spring Planting Errors to Avoid to Get Crops Off to Good Start

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Growers who want to make sure they get their corn crops off to a good start this season should make sure they perform tillage only when necessary and under the proper soil conditions, cautions a field crops expert with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. That’s just one of the tips Peter Thomison, an Ohio State University Extension agronomist, said can help growers avoid spring planting errors that could result in lower yield potential before the first plant has even emerged. OSU Extension is the statewide outreach arm of the college. Thomison says growers should stick with proven practices when it comes to getting corn planted, including getting corn planted before May 10, after which the potential...

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