News: News Releases

  1. 500 Standout Plants for Your Garden, 1 Day in Wooster to Get Them

    WOOSTER, Ohio — Secrest Arboretum has posted lists of the plants you can buy at its May 2 Plant Discovery Day. The selection includes nearly 500 hard-to-find types of trees, shrubs, herbs, annuals and perennials, including about 50 to bid on in oral and silent auctions. Here are some examples. Annuals Coleus mix (pictured below) (photo: iStock), Lavender Lace cuphea, Upright Peach diascia, Diamond Frost euphorbia, Lemon Licorice helichrysum, Atlantis heliotrope, Butterfly Deep Pink impatiens, Lucia Dark Blue lobelia, Augusta Blue Skies nierembergia, Charmed Wine oxalis, Supertunia petunia mix, Sunbini sanvitalia and 50 others. See the full list at go.osu.edu/2015SecrestAnnuals. Perennials Black Scallop ajuga, Royal Red buddleia (butterfly bush), Cruzin Broad Street...
  2. Secrest Arboretum’s Annual Plant Sale Is May 2

    WOOSTER, Ohio — A blueberry bush whose berries are pink. A dwarf, thornless raspberry plant, perfect for a patio planter, that still yields full-size fruit. A shrub, the Japanese orixa, whose leaves in fall turn white. A tree, the Joe Witt striped maple, whose bark resembles a peppermint stick. They’re four of the nearly 500 types of hard-to-find plants you can buy at Secrest Arboretum’s May 2 Plant Discovery Day. “Most are cultivars that you’re not going to find at your local nursery,” said Joe Cochran, the arboretum’s interim director. The annual event, which is a main fundraiser for the arboretum, goes from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Fisher Auditorium at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave. in Wooster. It...
  3. salmon with leafy greens

    Chow Line: Diet may play role in chronic inflammation

    Are there foods you can eat to reduce chronic inflammation? Health issues related to chronic inflammation have been getting quite a bit of attention in recent years. Ironically, inflammation is an important part of the immune system — in young people, bouts of inflammation actually help fight off disease and help repair damage from injury or exposure to harmful substances. But according to the National Institutes of Health (more precisely, the National institute on Aging), as people grow older, chronic inflammation often sets in, and it tends to be associated with a whole host of diseases and conditions, including heart disease, arthritis, frailty, type 2 diabetes, physical disability and dementia. The challenge is that the science to help us understand this link is still...
  4. State Fair Renovations Prompt New Times, Locations for 2015 Non-livestock 4-H Competitions

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- For the first time in more than three decades, Ohio 4-H members going to the Ohio State Fair who would normally compete for blue ribbons in the Rhodes Center will find themselves going to a different location. The Ohio Expo Center and State Fair is making improvements at the fairgrounds, demolishing some buildings this year and building a new multipurpose conference center to open in 2016, said Allen Auck, program manager for 4-H events and activities. As a result, the state fair needs the Rhodes Center for other purposes, and Ohio 4-H is adjusting when and where non-livestock project competitions will meet. “We just want to be certain that 4-H members and their families check the schedule and know when and where the events they are selected by their counties to...
  5. ice cream in bowl

    Media Advisory: Experts Available to Speak about Listeria and Ice Cream

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Two experts with The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences are available to speak about listeria and ice cream in light of two recent recalls, one of which involves Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams in Columbus. On Tuesday, Blue Bell Creameries of Texas expanded an earlier recall to include all of its products, sold in 23 states. Eight cases of listeriosis in Kansas and Texas, including three deaths, have been linked to Blue Bell products. Today, Jeni’s shut down its stores and recalled all of its products at retail stores due to a test by the Nebraska Department of Agriculture that found listeria in one of Jeni’s products. No illnesses have been associated with Jeni’s ice cream. To learn more...
  6.  Black cutworm. Photo: OSU Extension

    Reports of Large Populations of Black Cutworms, Armyworms in Indiana and Kentucky Signal Potential Concern for Ohio Growers

    WOOSTER, Ohio – Large populations of black cutworms reported last week in Indiana and Kentucky means Ohio farmers can soon expect to see the migratory moths in the Buckeye State, an entomologist with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University said. Black cutworms have been reported in the neighboring states of Indiana and Kentucky in significant numbers in traps set up by entomologists to determine the number of moths migrating up from the South, said Andy Michel, an Ohio State University Extension pest expert. Large numbers of armyworms have also been caught in the Kentucky traps, Michel said. Since these are migratory pests, Ohio growers should be prepared to start scouting their fields once corn is emerging or has come up. Both...
  7. Wanted: Farmers, Agriculture Agencies, Others to Complete Nutrient Management Survey

    SOUTH CHARLESTON, Ohio – Nutrient management experts in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University are asking farmers, producers, agriculture agencies and others to complete a survey on how they receive and use information on manure nutrient management. Called the Pathways Project, the survey will tell Ohio State University Extension what are the most effective ways to get information on nutrient management into the hands of those who need it, said Amanda Douridas, an OSU Extension agriculture and natural resources educator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. People working with manure nutrients are invited to complete the survey at pathwaysproject2015.questionpro.com/, Douridas said. “The objective of the...
  8. Salt test for spotted wing drosophila shows larvae floating out of fruit. Photo: Ohio State University.

    Workshop Teaches Growers to Identify Spotted Wing Drosophila

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – In order to combat the damaging impact of spotted wing drosophila on small fruit crops, growers have to know what the winged pests look like so they can start treatment even after finding just one of them in their fields, according to an entomologist with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. The spotted wing drosophila, which can destroy an entire fruit crop, looks like a common vinegar fly to the untrained eye, said Jim Jasinski, an Ohio State University Extension educator and Integrated Pest Management program coordinator. If even one of these pests is detected in a field with ripening fruit, it needs to be treated, he said. “When spotted wing drosophila comes into a field, it will attack ripening or...
  9. A worm in a cherry. Photo: Thinkstock

    Webinar offers Management and Monitoring Tips for Spotted Wing Drosophila

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – A relatively new but already widespread winged pest to Ohio small fruit growers can cause significant crop damage but, if spotted early, can be managed to avoid losses, according to an entomologist with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. While spotted wing drosophila may look like a common vinegar fly, it instead has the potential to wipe out entire fruit crops because of its propensity to attack healthy ripening fruit, said Celeste Welty, an Ohio State University Extension entomologist and associate professor of entomology. “The bad news about this pest is that is it widespread and causes significant damage,” said Welty, who also has an appointment with the Ohio Agricultural Research and...
  10. OARDC Names Poster Competition Winners

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — The Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, the research arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University, has named the winners of its 2015 research poster competition held April 16 during the center’s annual research conference in Columbus. The competition, which drew 83 entries, recognized outstanding research posters by OARDC-supported graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and research assistants and associates. Ph.D. Students First place: Kayla I. Perry, Department of Entomology, “Effects of forest disturbance on ground-dwelling invertebrate dispersal”; adviser, Daniel A. Herms. Second place: Johnathon P. Sheets, Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological...

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