News: News Releases

  1. A worm in a cherry. Photo: Thinkstock

    Webinar offers Management and Monitoring Tips for Spotted Wing Drosophila

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – A relatively new but already widespread winged pest to Ohio small fruit growers can cause significant crop damage but, if spotted early, can be managed to avoid losses, according to an entomologist with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. While spotted wing drosophila may look like a common vinegar fly, it instead has the potential to wipe out entire fruit crops because of its propensity to attack healthy ripening fruit, said Celeste Welty, an Ohio State University Extension entomologist and associate professor of entomology. “The bad news about this pest is that is it widespread and causes significant damage,” said Welty, who also has an appointment with the Ohio Agricultural Research and...
  2. OARDC Names Poster Competition Winners

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — The Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, the research arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University, has named the winners of its 2015 research poster competition held April 16 during the center’s annual research conference in Columbus. The competition, which drew 83 entries, recognized outstanding research posters by OARDC-supported graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and research assistants and associates. Ph.D. Students First place: Kayla I. Perry, Department of Entomology, “Effects of forest disturbance on ground-dwelling invertebrate dispersal”; adviser, Daniel A. Herms. Second place: Johnathon P. Sheets, Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological...
  3. Photo: Thinkstock

    OSU Extension Training Reaches Nearly 1 Million Acres Toward Improving Water Quality

    Editor’s note: Greg LaBarge, Ohio State University Extension field specialist and co-leader of Ohio State’s Agronomic Crops Team, will participate in the Ohio Farm Bureau Clean Water Status Report Teleconference today, April 20, from 1 to 1:45 p.m. To participate, call 888-587-0615, and provide conference ID number: 5317257. COLUMBUS, Ohio — There’s a growing army working to improve Ohio’s water quality. Since last fall, the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University has provided fertilizer applicator certification training to 6,439 Ohio growers responsible for farming some 927,000 acres of Buckeye state farmland, and the numbers continue to grow. Taught by Ohio State University Extension’s Agriculture...
  4. OARDC Honors Award Winners at Conference

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — The Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, the research arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University, presented the following awards April 16 at its 2015 annual research conference in Columbus. Distinguished Senior Faculty Research Award Steve Schwartz, professor and Carl E. Haas Endowed Chair, Department of Food Science and Technology, studies the role of dietary phytochemicals (natural chemical compounds in plants) and functional foods in health, especially cancer prevention. His research on carotenoids (natural pigments found in plants), for example, has shown they can help prevent several types of cancer. Steve Schwartz Schwartz also has demonstrated that eating vegetables together with...
  5. washing produce in sink

    Chow Line: Keep fresh produce healthy and safe

    I’m hearing more about antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Should I start cleaning fresh produce with a commercial fruit and vegetable wash? Antibiotic-resistant microbes, including bacteria, viruses and other bugs, are indeed a serious public health issue in the areas of both food safety and healthcare. But if you carefully follow standard guidelines to reduce the risk of foodborne illness from fresh produce, food safety experts say any added benefit you might get from commercial washes available today would be minimal at best. You may be hearing more about antibiotic resistance because of a series of outbreaks that recently made news. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a strain of Shigella bacteria that is resistant to ciprofloxacin, or Cipro, a commonly...
  6. Hops plantation. Photo: Thinkstock

    Learn About Hops Production During First Friday Tours

    PIKETON, Ohio – Growers and others interested in learning more about the Ohio hops research at The Ohio State University can attend tours of its hop fields in both Piketon and Wooster. The Hop Production to Enhance Economic Opportunities for Farmers and Brewers project is offering early stage growers, advanced growers and anyone else interested in hops production an opportunity to tour the hop research trials. The trials are taking place at Ohio State University South Centers in Piketon and at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster, Participants can learn basic information on how to get started in hops production as well as what resources may be available to help growers, said Charissa McGlothin, program assistant with South Centers. OSU Extension and...
  7. Sweet sorghum. Photo: Thinkstock

    Ohio State offers Workshop on Sustainable Advanced Energy Feedstock Production

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Farmers with land that isn’t productive for growing commodity crops such as corn, soybeans or wheat may find they can use the land to inexpensively grow energy crops that can generate a significant source of income. Thanks to a growing demand for alternative energy sources that is fueling increased interest in energy crops, farmers could find a profitable use for land they previously viewed as marginal, said Rafiq Islam, the soil, water and bioenergy resources program leader at The Ohio State University’s South Centers in Piketon. Growing energy crops could be an inexpensive way to provide farmers an additional source of income, said Islam, who holds joint appointments with Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and...
  8. Spend found sand

    Spent Foundry Sand’s Second Life: OK to Use in Some Soils

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — A study by scientists at The Ohio State University played a key role in a recent public health and environmental risk assessment of reusing spent foundry sands, or SFS, in certain soil-related uses. The sands are a byproduct from the metal casting industry. Nicholas Basta, professor of soil and environmental science, and Elizabeth Dayton, research scientist, both in the School of Environment and Natural Resources, did an intensive analysis of SFS in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service. The school is part of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The scientists’ work supported a risk assessment by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which found that silica-based...
  9. Charlotte Wagner with 4-H members

    69 Years and Counting: Longest-Serving Ohio 4-H Volunteer’s Experience Inspires Others

    Editor: April is National Volunteer Month. LOWELL, Ohio -- Like thousands of other Ohio children, Charlotte Wagner joined a local 4-H club when she was 9 years old. Today, 75 years later, 4-H remains part and parcel of Wagner’s life, as she recently celebrated 69 years as a 4-H volunteer. “I always enjoyed 4-H so much,” Wagner said. “It’s a valuable program, and I’m glad to have had a part in seeing it continue. I still enjoy being around the kids and meeting their parents. It’s a great thing.” Wagner’s service is remarkable among volunteers for Ohio 4-H Youth Development, said Tom Archer, assistant director of Ohio State University Extension in charge of 4-H programs. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University...
  10. produce in grocery cart

    Chow Line: Why choose whole foods over processed?

    I’m dating a guy who loves to cook, which is great, but he seems to rely on a lot of processed foods. Would it be worthwhile, health-wise, to try to shift him more toward fresh, whole foods?  Probably, yes. But it depends on what you mean by “processed foods.” Although foods that are minimally processed — frozen fruits and vegetables without sauces or seasonings, for example — fare comparably to their fresh counterparts, highly processed foods often are loaded with sodium, fat, added sugar and calories or are otherwise compromised, such as whole grains being processed into refined grains. A recent study presented at the American Society for Nutrition annual meeting indicates that processed foods may have larger health implications in the U.S. than...

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