News: News Releases

  1. Soybean. Photo: Thinkstock

    How to Evaluate Emerging Soybeans

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – With the majority of soybeans now planted in Ohio and some plants beginning to emerge, growers statewide should evaluate soybean stands to determine if their crops are doing well or if they may need to consider replanting. With high costs associated with replanting, most growers should carefully weigh all options before deciding to replant, said a field crops expert in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. While most soybean growers across Ohio report good stands, a few growers are seeing damping-off and uneven emergence, said Laura Lindsey, a soybean and small grains specialist with Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the college’s outreach arm. “If soybean emergence is uneven,...
  2. Hops. Photo: Thinkstock

    More Opportunities to Take Hops Production Tours

    PIKETON, Ohio — Next Wednesday is the deadline for growers and others interested in learning more about hops research at The Ohio State University to register to attend the June 5 tours of hop fields in Piketon and Wooster, organizers said. The Hop Production to Enhance Economic Opportunities for Farmers and Brewers project offers tours of its hop research trials at the Ohio State University South Centers in Piketon and at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster. Participants can learn basic information on how to get started in hops production as well as what resources may be available to help growers, said Charissa McGlothin, program assistant with the South Centers. OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms, respectively, of Ohio State...
  3. Dig Big Darby Creek June 11

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — June’s breakfast program by the Environmental Professionals Network features central Ohio’s Big Darby Creek, a National Scenic River. Included are chances to walk along it, wade in it and see a nearby bison herd. “Still harboring an inferiority complex that central Ohio’s outdoor places don’t stack up nationally?” the event’s flier asks. “Attend this breakfast and exorcise that notion forever.” The program, called “A Summer Delight,” is 7:30-10:30 a.m. June 11 at the Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park Nature Center, 1775 Darby Creek Drive, in Galloway west of Columbus. Registration costs $10 ($15 if paid by credit card), includes breakfast, and is open to both members and nonmembers of the network....
  4. laptop on kitchen counter

    Chow Line: Learn more about your food with Food-A-Pedia

    I’ve started to plan meals for a week at a time to help streamline my grocery shopping. Since I’m trying to drop a few pounds, I’d like to do some quick legwork to compare calories in some foods I eat regularly. If I wait to look at Nutrition Facts labels while shopping, I feel like I’m in the store forever. Any ideas that could help? There is plenty of information online that could help you track down the calories and nutrients in foods, but one that might be particularly easy to use — and is free — is Food-A-Pedia, which is part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s SuperTracker website. With SuperTracker, you can plug in information to get a personalized nutrition and physical activity plan. To get a personalized plan, you need to sign up...
  5. Bruce Kettler, Bruce McPheron, and Scott Beck

    Beck’s Hybrids Makes Five-Year, $1 Million Commitment to Field to Faucet, Farm Science Review

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — A water quality effort and the Farm Science Review at The Ohio State University received a $1 million boost from Beck’s Hybrids, to be contributed over the next five years in monetary and in-kind support. The gift was announced Thursday, May 21. Beck’s Hybrids is the largest family-owned retail seed company in the United States and is based in Atlanta, Indiana. Beck’s has a location in London, Ohio, and serves farmers in eight Midwestern states. “We are supporting Field to Faucet and the Farm Science Review because they are important to farmers, and farmers are important to us,” said Scott Beck, president of the company. The university’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences launched Field to Faucet shortly...
  6. Register by Friday for May 29 Endangered Species Act Workshop

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — The Endangered Species Act of 1973 is more important than ever due to persistent threats such as climate change and newly emerging issues like white-nose disease in bats, says Jeremy Bruskotter, a scientist at The Ohio State University. He’s helping host a workshop for professionals on the act. “Increasing scientific evidence indicates we may be entering a sixth mass extinction,” said Bruskotter, an associate professor in the School of Environment and Natural Resources. “Therefore, knowledge of the act’s provisions will be increasingly useful for those charged with managing our forests, fisheries and wildlife.” The school is in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The workshop, featuring talks by...
  7. Fusarium Head Blight. Photo: Ohio State University Extension

    OSU Wheat Expert: Some Wheat Crops at Risk for Scab Development

    WOOSTER, Ohio – Southwest Ohio wheat growers with early flowering fields planted with highly scab-susceptible varieties are at moderate risk for Fusarium head blight development this week, said a wheat expert from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. And while northern Ohio is at a high threat for Fusarium head blight, also called head scab, growers there don’t need to panic because much of their wheat is probably not at the critical flowering stage yet, said Pierce Paul, an Ohio State University Extension wheat specialist. Much of Ohio’s wheat has progressed considerably over the last week and is now heading out in some fields, said Paul, who is also a plant pathologist with the Ohio Agricultural...
  8. Podcast Demonstrates How to Identify Wheat Growth Stages

    WOOSTER, Ohio — A wheat expert from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University has created a series of YouTube videos that demonstrate how growers can identify the various growth stages of wheat crops. The series is designed as an online tool to help wheat growers identify various stages of wheat growth and to know what management strategies can be used during each growth stage, said Pierce Paul, an Ohio State University Extension wheat researcher. The videos, which begin with wheat at Feekes Growth Stage 6, will show all the growth stages of wheat throughout the growing season, said Paul, who is also a plant pathologist with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.  OSU Extension and OARDC are the...
  9. empty plate

    ​In study, skipping meals is linked to abdominal weight gain

    Research in animals shows spikes, drops in insulin affect liver Editor: This story was released earlier today by University Communications and is also online at news.osu.edu/news/2015/05/19/skipping-meals/. COLUMBUS, Ohio – A new study in animals suggests that skipping meals sets off a series of metabolic miscues that can result in abdominal weight gain. In the study, mice that ate all of their food as a single meal and fasted the rest of the day developed insulin resistance in their livers – which scientists consider a telltale sign of prediabetes. When the liver doesn’t respond to insulin signals telling it to stop producing glucose, that extra sugar in the blood is stored as fat. These mice initially were put on a restricted diet and lost...
  10. Scott Shearer, chair of CFAES’s Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, examines a drone at Farm Science Review. Photo: Farm Science Review.

    2015 Farm Science Review Takes On Sharp Edge

    LONDON, Ohio – Farmers and producers can gain a sharper edge and glean cutting-edge ideas from experts from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University during this year’s Farm Science Review Sept. 22-24 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, Ohio. The Review will again emphasize the best agricultural research, resources, information and access for farmers, said Chuck Gamble, who manages the Review. Last year, the Review offered 180 educational presentations and opportunities presented by Ohio State University Extension educators, specialists and faculty, as well as Purdue University educators. Farm Science Review is all about learning new tips, techniques and information to help producers increase their farm operation...

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