News: News Releases

  1. groceries in trunk of car

    Chow Line: When shopping, be smart about food safety

    I recently moved to a rural area, and it takes about 25 minutes to drive to the nearest grocery store. A friend suggested we keep a cooler in the trunk to put perishables in as we leave the store. That seems like overkill. Is it necessary? It’s not a bad idea, especially during hot weather. Although the normal guideline for perishable foods is to make sure they remain in the “danger zone” of 40 to 140 degrees F for no longer than two hours, that time frame shortens to just one hour when it’s 90 degrees or hotter. So, when it’s hot outside, it’s important to do what you can to keep food as cool as possible. It’s important to note that the time limit for the danger zone is cumulative: That is, if food remains in the zone for 45 minutes between the...
  2. Picture of clean drinking water

    Ohio State Water Experts to Speak to Columbus Metropolitan Club June 3

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Three experts from The Ohio State University will talk about the battle for Lake Erie, and for all of Ohio’s water, at next week’s Columbus Metropolitan Club Luncheon. Bruce McPheron, Jeff Reutter and Eugene Braig will present “What the Muck? Managing Ohio’s Freshwater Assets” from noon to 1:15 p.m. June 3 at the Athletic Club of Columbus, 136 E. Broad St. McPheron is Ohio State’s vice president for agricultural administration and dean of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. In the wake of last summer’s Toledo water crisis, he and others from the college started Field to Faucet, a new program meant to ensure safe water for all Ohioans while keeping the state’s farms productive and profitable...
  3. Soybean. Photo: Thinkstock

    How to Evaluate Emerging Soybeans

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – With the majority of soybeans now planted in Ohio and some plants beginning to emerge, growers statewide should evaluate soybean stands to determine if their crops are doing well or if they may need to consider replanting. With high costs associated with replanting, most growers should carefully weigh all options before deciding to replant, said a field crops expert in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. While most soybean growers across Ohio report good stands, a few growers are seeing damping-off and uneven emergence, said Laura Lindsey, a soybean and small grains specialist with Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the college’s outreach arm. “If soybean emergence is uneven,...
  4. Hops. Photo: Thinkstock

    More Opportunities to Take Hops Production Tours

    PIKETON, Ohio — Next Wednesday is the deadline for growers and others interested in learning more about hops research at The Ohio State University to register to attend the June 5 tours of hop fields in Piketon and Wooster, organizers said. The Hop Production to Enhance Economic Opportunities for Farmers and Brewers project offers tours of its hop research trials at the Ohio State University South Centers in Piketon and at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster. Participants can learn basic information on how to get started in hops production as well as what resources may be available to help growers, said Charissa McGlothin, program assistant with the South Centers. OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms, respectively, of Ohio State...
  5. Dig Big Darby Creek June 11

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — June’s breakfast program by the Environmental Professionals Network features central Ohio’s Big Darby Creek, a National Scenic River. Included are chances to walk along it, wade in it and see a nearby bison herd. “Still harboring an inferiority complex that central Ohio’s outdoor places don’t stack up nationally?” the event’s flier asks. “Attend this breakfast and exorcise that notion forever.” The program, called “A Summer Delight,” is 7:30-10:30 a.m. June 11 at the Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park Nature Center, 1775 Darby Creek Drive, in Galloway west of Columbus. Registration costs $10 ($15 if paid by credit card), includes breakfast, and is open to both members and nonmembers of the network....
  6. laptop on kitchen counter

    Chow Line: Learn more about your food with Food-A-Pedia

    I’ve started to plan meals for a week at a time to help streamline my grocery shopping. Since I’m trying to drop a few pounds, I’d like to do some quick legwork to compare calories in some foods I eat regularly. If I wait to look at Nutrition Facts labels while shopping, I feel like I’m in the store forever. Any ideas that could help? There is plenty of information online that could help you track down the calories and nutrients in foods, but one that might be particularly easy to use — and is free — is Food-A-Pedia, which is part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s SuperTracker website. With SuperTracker, you can plug in information to get a personalized nutrition and physical activity plan. To get a personalized plan, you need to sign up...
  7. Bruce Kettler, Bruce McPheron, and Scott Beck

    Beck’s Hybrids Makes Five-Year, $1 Million Commitment to Field to Faucet, Farm Science Review

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — A water quality effort and the Farm Science Review at The Ohio State University received a $1 million boost from Beck’s Hybrids, to be contributed over the next five years in monetary and in-kind support. The gift was announced Thursday, May 21. Beck’s Hybrids is the largest family-owned retail seed company in the United States and is based in Atlanta, Indiana. Beck’s has a location in London, Ohio, and serves farmers in eight Midwestern states. “We are supporting Field to Faucet and the Farm Science Review because they are important to farmers, and farmers are important to us,” said Scott Beck, president of the company. The university’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences launched Field to Faucet shortly...
  8. Register by Friday for May 29 Endangered Species Act Workshop

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — The Endangered Species Act of 1973 is more important than ever due to persistent threats such as climate change and newly emerging issues like white-nose disease in bats, says Jeremy Bruskotter, a scientist at The Ohio State University. He’s helping host a workshop for professionals on the act. “Increasing scientific evidence indicates we may be entering a sixth mass extinction,” said Bruskotter, an associate professor in the School of Environment and Natural Resources. “Therefore, knowledge of the act’s provisions will be increasingly useful for those charged with managing our forests, fisheries and wildlife.” The school is in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The workshop, featuring talks by...
  9. Fusarium Head Blight. Photo: Ohio State University Extension

    OSU Wheat Expert: Some Wheat Crops at Risk for Scab Development

    WOOSTER, Ohio – Southwest Ohio wheat growers with early flowering fields planted with highly scab-susceptible varieties are at moderate risk for Fusarium head blight development this week, said a wheat expert from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. And while northern Ohio is at a high threat for Fusarium head blight, also called head scab, growers there don’t need to panic because much of their wheat is probably not at the critical flowering stage yet, said Pierce Paul, an Ohio State University Extension wheat specialist. Much of Ohio’s wheat has progressed considerably over the last week and is now heading out in some fields, said Paul, who is also a plant pathologist with the Ohio Agricultural...
  10. Podcast Demonstrates How to Identify Wheat Growth Stages

    WOOSTER, Ohio — A wheat expert from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University has created a series of YouTube videos that demonstrate how growers can identify the various growth stages of wheat crops. The series is designed as an online tool to help wheat growers identify various stages of wheat growth and to know what management strategies can be used during each growth stage, said Pierce Paul, an Ohio State University Extension wheat researcher. The videos, which begin with wheat at Feekes Growth Stage 6, will show all the growth stages of wheat throughout the growing season, said Paul, who is also a plant pathologist with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.  OSU Extension and OARDC are the...

Pages