News: News Releases

  1. Farm Science Reivew

    Online Tickets Now Available for the 2015 Farm Science Review

    LONDON, Ohio (July 29, 2015) - Tickets for the 2015 Farm Science Review are now available for purchase online at fsr.osu.edu/onlineticketform, allowing attendees to bypass gate sales by purchasing tickets in advance of the annual three-day farm show to be held Sept. 22-24 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, Ohio. This is the third year for online ticket sales, and the option is becoming more and more popular among attendees, said Matt Sullivan, assistant manager of the Farm Science Review, which is sponsored by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. “Our online ticket sales have increased each year since it’s been an option,” he said. “It allows attendees that are visiting from out-of-state to...
  2. student with checkbook

    Family Fundamentals: Help student heading to college set a budget

    Help student heading to college set a budget My son is starting college this year. I want to sit him down to help him learn how to set a budget, but he is resisting. How much should I press him? No matter what your son is majoring in or how much he ends up earning during his career, learning how to set and live on a budget is one of those critical life lessons that will impact him for years — really, decades — to come. If he doesn’t learn how to manage his money now, he very well may regret it later when he has to deal with the consequences. If you’re going to insist on anything, insist he at least sit down with you to talk about it. It’s not unusual for a young person to stonewall when a parent wants to offer guidance. He is probably feeling like he is on...
  3. Oh, Deer! Workshop Set on Managing Backyard Wildlife Conflicts

    PERRYSBURG, Ohio — Seen coyotes near your home? Do deer eat your shrubs down to nubs? Get tips on what to do in a workshop led by wildlife experts Stan Gehrt and Marne Titchenell of The Ohio State University. The Good, the Bad and the Hungry: Managing Wildlife Conflicts in Your Landscape is 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 7 at the Wood County Park District’s W.W. Knight Nature Preserve, 29530 White Road in Perrysburg, near Toledo. Registration is $35, includes lunch and is needed by noon Aug. 3. Get details and a link to online registration and payment at go.osu.edu/08-07WildlifeWorkshop. An associate professor and Extension wildlife specialist, Gehrt has become widely known in the field of urban wildlife, especially for his research on Chicago’s coyotes. Two episodes of the...
  4. Goji berry. Photo: Thinkstock.

    OSU Extension: ‘Superfruits’ Could Offer Ohio Growers Alternative Income Source; Workshop Set for Aug. 20

    PIKETON, Ohio – The potential market for so-called “superfruits” in Ohio could offer growers an additional income stream thanks to increasingly health-conscious consumers and ongoing research that finds these plants can grow well in the Buckeye state. That’s according to a fruit crop expert with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University, who said that based on research trials of elderberry, aronia berry and Chinese goji berry plants at Ohio State’s South Centers in Piketon, the berries are a viable option for Ohio growers. Fruits such as these, which are also known as super berries because of their nutrition quotient including a rich antioxidant content, are growing well in the research trials, said Gary Gao...
  5. Block O in cornfield

    Cornfield’s ‘Cool’ Block O Designed to Spur Conversations on Precision Ag Potential

    LONDON, Ohio -- A cornfield west of Columbus is showing some Buckeye pride with an unmistakable Block O pattern when viewed from above. The demonstration plot’s design, depicting the symbol of The Ohio State University, isn’t a crop circle or a corn maze. It was established thanks to new dual-hybrid planting technology that Ohio State researchers are putting under the microscope. “In general, farmers have always managed their acreage on a per-field basis, depending on their soil characteristics and other production factors,” said John Fulton, precision agriculture specialist for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. “Now, 2015 is the first year technology is...
  6. NW Ohio Farmers: Sign Up for Project Designed to Improve Ohio Water Quality

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Researchers with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University are looking for farmers in the Maumee River Basin to volunteer for a study to determine the best management practices to reduce nutrient runoff while increasing crop yields. Greg LaBarge, an Ohio State University Extension field specialist and a leader of Ohio State’s Agronomic Crops Team, is leading the Farmer Phosphorus Water Quality Monitoring Project. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. The data will be used to quantify economic and environmental nutrient losses associated with phosphorus runoff, LaBarge said. The goal is to determine the best tools to target high-risk fields and design the most effective practices to maintain crop...
  7. Pumpkin Field Night Aug. 20 Focuses on Managing Pests and Disease

    SOUTH CHARLESTON, Ohio – Novice and experienced pumpkin growers and crop consultants can learn more about pumpkin production, including managing pests and diseases, at the 2015 Pumpkin Field Day Aug. 20. The event will focus on multiple topics including current and unregistered fungicides used to control powdery mildew and offer a first-hand view of their efficacy in demonstration trials, said Jim Jasinski, an Ohio State University Extension educator and Integrated Pest Management program coordinator. The event is from 6-8 p.m. at the Western Agricultural Research Station, 7721 South Charleston Pike, in South Charleston. The research station is part of the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms, respectively,...
  8. ice water

    Chow Line: As mercury rises, beat the heat with water

    Do we really need to drink more water when the weather is hot? If you’re outdoors when it’s hot and sticky, and you become hot and sticky yourself, then, yes, that’s a good signal that you should drink more water. You might not think much about it, but water is the most abundant substance in your body. Each and every organ in your body needs water to do its job. Water serves as a medium where chemical reactions take place — and the body is a veritable 24-hours-a-day laboratory bustling with such reactions. Water also helps control body heat through perspiration and helps lubricate your knees, elbows and other joints. And it does other jobs, as well — too many to list here. As your body uses all that water, and loses it from perspiration, urination and...
  9. compass, map

    Ohio State's STEM Camp Taps Scotts for Real-Life Lessons

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – About 30 middle school students are getting hands-on instruction and inspiration in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) during Ohio 4-H STEM Discovery Camp this week at the Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center on The Ohio State University campus.  Sponsored by The Scotts Miracle-Gro Company and Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, 4-H STEM Camp brought together students in grades 7 through 9 from around the state to experience such science- and engineering-related activities as robotics, dairy science, dairy foods production, plant based bio-products, and engineering design challenges in aquaculture and ecology.  On Thursday, July 23, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., the campers will participate in a...
  10. A view of the new Williams greenhouses. (Photo by Ken Chamberlain)

    New Greenhouses Boost Research, Competitive Edge

    WOOSTER, Ohio — The new Williams Hall greenhouse complex on the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center’s Wooster campus is much more than a replacement for the greenhouse lost to a tornado almost five years ago: It’s a state-of-the-art facility that will help advance plant research and strengthen Ohio agriculture. The original Williams Hall greenhouse complex was leveled by a September 2010 tornado that destroyed or damaged many other buildings and more than 1,000 trees at OARDC, the research arm of The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The new greenhouses became operational in November 2014. “It has been a long time coming, but our new facility will enhance the research and educational...

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