News: News Releases

  1. grandmother with grandchild slicing an apple

    Chow Line: Kids not eating fruit? Try cutting, slicing it

    How can I get my grandchildren to eat more fruits and vegetables when they’re visiting? I am lucky that I get to have them over often, but I can’t seem to entice them to eat much produce. You’re not alone. Most children (and teens and adults for that matter) don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables, according to data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. But for kids, you might try thinking small. That is, if you don’t already, try slicing fruits and vegetables into bite-size pieces. You might be surprised at the results. Research by the Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University indicates that slicing fruit could increase consumption, at least in school cafeterias. You might find similar success at home. For the study, published in 2013 in the American...
  2. Farm Science Review. Photo: FSR.

    Good Weather, Innovation Drive Farm Science Review Attendance

    LONDON, Ohio – Sunny skies and warm temperatures ushered in strong attendance at the annual Farm Science Review held Sept. 20-22 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center near London, Ohio, which saw some 125,790 visitors over its three-day run. Sponsored by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University, the Review offered farmers and growers a wonderful opportunity to learn about the latest agricultural research and innovation, said Matt Sullivan, superintendent of the Molly Caren center. Some 24,200 visitors attended the show Thursday (9/22), with 46,680 in attendance for Tuesday’s (9/20) opening day, while Wednesday (9/21) was the highest-attended day with 54,910 visitors, he said. “When you look at the overall Farm Science...
  3. image of cafeteria tray with apple, salad, vegetables

    Ohio Farm to School Workshops Set for October, November

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — When it comes to the school cafeteria, it’s not often that “farm-fresh food” comes to mind. But there’s no reason why it shouldn’t, said Carol Smathers, Ohio Farm to School coordinator for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The benefits stretch beyond fresh fare on the lunch plate, Smathers said. Farm to School programs, which connect local farms with educational institutions, provide opportunities for students to learn more about agriculture and local foods while also strengthening local food systems, she said. To help spread the word and potentially expand Farm to School programs throughout the state, the...
  4. OARDC Dedicates New Art, Renovated Campus Entrance

    WOOSTER, Ohio — Science met art Sept. 16 when Wooster’s Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center dedicated a new sculpture and water feature at its renovated campus entrance. The event took place six years to the day after a tornado entered the campus at nearly the very same spot, causing millions of dollars in damage to greenhouses, buildings and trees but fortunately no injuries. Called “The Fruit of Inquiry,” the sculpture was done by Gallipolis artist Kevin Lyles, who’s a professor of sculpture at the University of Rio Grande in southeast Ohio. It features small fountains, 15 tons of glacial stone symbolizing Ohio’s soil and fields, large open cubes made from gleaming metal rods evoking streams and flowing water, and some 70 bronze...
  5. holding hands on gut, intestinal problems

    Chow Line: Restrictive diet can help ease intestinal issues

    I have a friend who no longer eats wheat products, onions, garlic or a lot of other foods. She said it’s because she has been experiencing stomach problems and a “low-FODMAP” diet was recommended. It sounds serious. What is it? FODMAP is an acronym used for foods containing certain carbohydrates that aren’t absorbed well in the intestines and can be rapidly fermented in the gut. In some people, they cause gas, bloating, abdominal pain, excess fluid, constipation and diarrhea. The acronym stands for fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols — a mouthful, which is why you will hear the term “FODMAPs” a lot more often than the actual words it stands for. The low-FODMAP diet was developed in the last 10 years by...
  6. girl holding plant

    School Gardens ‘Magical’: Conference Oct. 7

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — A school garden can be a magical place for kids, says Sue Hogan. “Especially if they don’t live in the best environment, it can be peaceful, interesting and exciting — an alternative to their everyday life.” That’s one reason why Hogan, a 4-H educator for Ohio State University Extension, is coordinating the fourth annual Ohio School Garden Conference, whose theme is “Getting Back to Our Roots.” The event will be held 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Oct. 7 at The Ohio State University’s Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, 2201 Fred Taylor Drive, on the Columbus campus. The idea is to help teachers, administrators, after-school program personnel and interested community members start and maintain school gardens, which...
  7. Aquaculture farm. Photo: Thinkstock

    Ohio State Aquaculture Boot Camp Program Recruiting New Fish Farmers

    PIKETON, Ohio – Want to learn how to become a fish farmer? The Ohio Center for Aquaculture Research and Development at The Ohio State University South Centers is offering 30 new and beginning fish farmers an in-depth introduction to aquaculture and aquaponics and the business of fish farming through a yearlong program. Called Aquaculture Boot Camp-2 or ABC-2, the program’s goal is to increase the number of fish farmers in the region, said Hanping Wang, the director of the ABC program at the OSU South Centers. The OSU South Centers are part of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. “The goal of the ABC-2 is to enhance the sustainability of new and beginning aquaculture, aquaponic and next-generation farmers in Ohio and the Midwest,” Wang...
  8. image of flag, money and 2016 election

    Voters Invited: Ohio State Economists Discuss Presidential Election Oct. 3

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — There has been considerable rhetoric around key issues in the upcoming presidential election, but much less analysis of their potential economic impact.   Several economists from The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences hope to offer voters deeper insight into some of these issues during an Oct. 3 evening conversation, providing a critical, unbiased, non-partisan economic examination of key themes in this year’s debate. “As applied economists, our faculty are trained to look at all sides of an issue and draw informed conclusions based on sound economic reasoning,” said Tim Haab, professor and chair of Ohio State’s Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics....
  9. Health, Safety Exhibits Featured at Farm Science Review Sept. 20-22

    LONDON, Ohio — Visiting the McCormick Building at the annual Farm Science Review can provide eye-opening realizations on health and safety, say exhibit organizers. While most of the anticipated 110,000-plus attendees at the Sept. 20-22 event come for the agricultural presentations and demonstrations, many make at least one stop in the McCormick Building, located about halfway down Friday Avenue, the main drag of the exhibit grounds. One of the nation’s premier agricultural trade and education shows, the Farm Science Review is an annual three-day event sponsored by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. It takes place at the college’s Molly Caren Agricultural Center, about 25 miles west of Columbus. Admission is $7 in...
  10. Get Feet Wet in Aquaponics at FSR

    LONDON, Ohio — Two talks at the Sept. 20-22 Farm Science Review will dive into aquaponics. “There’s growing interest in aquaponics in the Midwest,” said Matthew Smith, an aquaculture specialist with The Ohio State University who will give the talks. “People like the idea of the marriage between fish and plants.” The Review is an annual agricultural trade show in London, about 25 miles west of Columbus. Its sponsor is Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Smith is with the college’s outreach arm, Ohio State University Extension. Aquaponics merges aquaculture with hydroponics and wastewater management, he said. It combines tilapia and lettuce, for example, or koi and basil, or catfish and strawberries...

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