News: News Releases

  1. man with laptop at kitchen breakfast table

    Chow Line: Stay safe by signing up for food recall alerts

    My wife was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and so we are both watching what we eat much more carefully. I was surprised to learn that she needs to be more careful about foodborne illness now. We think we do pretty good at following guidelines at home, but how can we find out about food recalls? Good for you for being aware that you need to be, well, more aware. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 1 in 6 of us will suffer from foodborne illness every year, at-risk groups of people are more likely to get sick from contaminated food, and the illnesses can be much more severe. People with diabetes are 25 to 30 times more likely to get sick with listeriosis, for example, than a healthy adult. Anyone with a chronic health condition, such as diabetes...
  2. Why Americans Waste So Much Food

    Most people feel guilty about discarding food, but say it would be hard to stop Editor: This news release is also being distributed today by University Communications.  COLUMBUS, Ohio — Even though American consumers throw away about 80 billion pounds of food a year, only about half of them are aware that food waste is a problem. Even more, researchers have identified that most people perceive benefits to throwing food away, some of which have only limited basis in fact. A study published today in PLOS ONE is just the second peer-reviewed large-scale consumer survey about food waste and is the first in the U.S. to identify patterns regarding how Americans form attitudes on food waste. The results provide the data required to develop targeted efforts to reduce the...
  3. Presenters and attendees interact during a Pumpkin Field Day event. (Photo by Ken Chamberlain)

    Aug. 18 Pumpkin Field Day Tackles Disease, New Varieties, Use of Drone Technology

    SOUTH CHARLESTON, Ohio — This year’s Aug. 18 Pumpkin Field Day will offer growers valuable research updates regarding disease, insect and weed control as well as state-of-the-art demonstrations on the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), or drones, for more efficient pest detection. Organized by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University, the event will be held from 6-8 p.m. at the Western Agricultural Research Station, 7721 South Charleston Pike, in South Charleston, Ohio. “The field day will feature some traditional stops, including an eight-treatment powdery mildew fungicide demonstration trial, a variety trial with 12 powdery mildew-resistant hybrids ranging from small to large fruit, and a downy mildew sentinel...
  4. Workshop for Natural Resource Pros Will Give Intro to QGIS

    MANSFIELD, Ohio — Learn the ABCs of using QGIS — in this case, to map tree cover, land use, water quality and similar data — in an Aug. 17 workshop in Mansfield. QGIS is a free and open-source geographic information system, or GIS. It works on operating systems including Mac OS X, Linux, Unix and Microsoft Windows. The workshop is for anyone who studies or works with natural resources, including forests, farmland, watersheds and wildlife, said Kathy Smith, coordinator of the event’s sponsor, the Ohio Woodland Stewards Program. The stewards program is part of The Ohio State University and its College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Taught by Ohio State expert The instructor for the workshop will be Alexis Londo, a lecturer in the college...
  5. Greener Than Grass? Speaker Will Talk About Lawn Alternatives

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Susan Weber of Columbus-based Integrity Sustainable Planning and Design will headline the next breakfast of the Environmental Professionals Network on Aug. 9 at The Ohio State University. Weber, an expert on sustainable landscape design, will present “Transforming Our Yards: Doing More for Family and Community” as part of the 7:15 to 10:20 a.m. event in Ohio State’s Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center at 2201 Fred Taylor Drive in Columbus. She’ll look at alternatives to growing just lawns, including using the space for trees, wildlife habitat, bee and butterfly gardens, and fruit and vegetable plantings. Benefits can include fresh food for the home, “discovery” spaces for children, less time spent mowing and...
  6. Healthy water leads to healthy fish and increases the potential for healthy profits for fish farmers. CFAES workshop offers tips on how to boost water quality for fish farming. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Aquaculture Water Quality Workshop Offers Tips to Boost Profitability of Fish Farming

    PIKETON, Ohio – Healthy water leads to healthy fish and increases the potential for healthy profits for fish farmers. On the other hand, poor water quality can lead to stressed fish, increasing the chance for the animals’ illness and death, and resulting in income losses for farmers, says Matthew Smith, an Ohio State University Extension aquaculture specialist. Water quality management for fish farmers is the subject of an Aug. 6 workshop Smith is holding at the Ohio Center for Aquaculture Research and Development at The Ohio State University South Centers in Piketon. The workshop will focus on the importance of understanding water quality, water chemistry, and identifying water and weed problems applicable to fish farmers in Ohio, Smith said. “Water chemistry is an...
  7. Learn How to Diagnose Tree Problems at Workshop

    MANSFIELD, Ohio — Call it learning triage for trees. The Ohio Woodland Stewards Program is holding a workshop on diagnosing tree problems — from holes in leaves to galls on twigs, thinning crowns to dying branches — on Aug. 5 in Mansfield. Kathy Smith, coordinator of the program, said participants will learn how to tell if a tree needs immediate attention or not. Benefits can include faster treatment and better recovery on one hand and less urgency and expense on the other. The workshop is mainly for tree and landscape professionals, she said. It offers continuing education credits under the Society of American Foresters’ Continuing Forestry Education program and the International Society of Arboriculture’s Certified Arborist program. The Ohio Woodland...
  8. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Sprayers, Precision Ag Are Focus of Aug. 16 Southwest Ohio Corn Growers Field Day

    WASHINGTON COURT HOUSE, Ohio — Organizers will focus on technologies that can improve accuracy and efficiency while saving farmers money, increasing yields and protecting the environment during the Southwest Ohio Corn Growers Field Day on Aug. 16. A goal of the event is to help participants learn tips and techniques for improving farm productivity and profitability, said Ken Ford, an Ohio State University Extension educator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. “It’s an opportunity for farmers to come hear about new technologies and new research to help growers increase the profit margins on their farms,” he said. “Topics for the day were generated from issues...
  9. man examining food label in grocery store aisle

    Chow Line: How to use the ‘5-20’ rule for healthy choices

    I’ve never been a fan of Nutrition Facts labels, but a friend recently mentioned that she reads them all the time, using something called the “520 rule.” What is the 520 rule? Ah, she was talking about what is known as the ”5-20 rule,” and it applies to the Daily Value percentages that are listed on the label. Basically, it’s just a quick guideline to use when you look at those percentages to determine how a food might fit into your daily dietary goals. Any nutrient listed as 5 percent or less of the Daily Value is considered low. Any listed as 20 percent or more of the Daily Value is considered high. For nutrients you want to limit, such as saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium, try to choose foods with low Daily Value percentages. Foods with 5...
  10. pipelines across farm field

    Donation Launches Ohio State Study of Natural Gas Pipelines’ Impact on Farm Soil

    WOOSTER, Ohio — A study of how natural gas pipeline installations affect Ohio cropland productivity begins this fall thanks to a $200,000 gift from Kinder Morgan, Inc. to The Ohio State University. The study, to be overseen by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, focuses on soil disturbance caused by statewide pipeline installations. Kinder Morgan’s gift allows the college to begin identifying and sampling soil from farmer fields this fall, said Steve Culman, soil fertility specialist with Ohio State University Extension and project leader. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. Over the course of three years, the college will survey and take samples from 50 fields statewide, predominantly in rural areas. Samples will be taken before and...

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