News: News Releases

  1. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Fertilizer Applicator Certification Training Workshop Offered Aug. 29

    BOTKINS, Ohio — Growers will have an opportunity to gain fertilizer applicator certification training at a workshop Aug. 29. Known as Fertilizer Applicator Certification Training (FACT), the training allows farmers and commercial fertilizer applicators to meet the educational requirements of Ohio’s agricultural fertilization law. Passed in 2014, the legislation requires individuals who apply fertilizer to more than 50 acres to become certified by Sept. 30, 2017. Already, Ohio State University Extension has trained more than 10,000 Ohio farmers on best practices to apply fertilizer for optimum crop yield, reduce the risk of nutrient runoff and improve water quality throughout the state. The Aug. 29 three-hour workshop is just one of several training opportunities that will...
  2. Chow Line: Test dairy, nutrition IQ with MyPlate quizzes

    My son, who is 11, says that since butter is made from milk, it should be counted as a dairy food. I know that it’s not dairy, but can you help me explain why? The most important nutrient we get from dairy foods is calcium. Some foods made from milk, such as cheese and yogurt, retain their calcium content, and those foods are counted along with milk as part of the dairy group. However, there are foods made from milk that have little or no calcium. That includes butter, as well as cream, cream cheese and sour cream. These are all very high in saturated fat, which should be limited in a healthy diet. That’s why they’re not considered dairy foods, and they don’t count toward the three cups of dairy foods that anyone who is 9 or older should eat each day. (Speaking...
  3. goose by pond at South Centers

    25 and Counting: South Centers Marks Anniversary with Sept. 15 Open House

    PIKETON, Ohio — For the last quarter-century, a small southern Ohio village has hosted a center with university scientists conducting world-class agricultural research, and area entrepreneurs have thrived thanks to guidance from the center’s expert marketing and development specialists. It was Oct. 1, 1991, when The Ohio State University South Centers first opened its doors. Then known as the Piketon Research and Extension Center, the facility was designed to help Ohio State expand its land-grant mission of providing science-based outreach and engagement in the area. “Having the center here in southern Ohio brings ideas and opportunities to the local region,” said Tom Worley, who started at the center in 2000 and was named director in 2005. “And even though...
  4. Rendering of future OSU Extension Franklin County building

    $5 Million Gift Gives Ohio State Extension New Facility at Waterman Site

    COLUMBUS, Ohio-- A $5 million gift will extend the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The gift creates the Franklin County Extension Building Capital Fund, which will be used for construction and maintenance of new Franklin County Extension offices and learning spaces on Waterman Agricultural and Natural Resources Laboratory. Waterman consists of 261 acres of farmland located northwest of West Lane Avenue and Kenny Road. Waterman is designated for a major renovation into a research, learning and outreach hub. Bringing Franklin County Extension to Waterman will put cutting-edge research at the extension office’s front door. The new office will engage the community in demonstration gardens, large urban farm...
  5. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Aug. 26 Field Night to Focus on Calf Heifer Management, Key to Livestock Production Success

    JACKSON, Ohio — Livestock producers who want to improve the profit potential for their cow herd operations need to make successful heifer management a key component in their business plan, says a beef cattle expert with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. Heifer management is one of the most important things that livestock producers need to be concerned with in developing a cow herd, said John Grimes, beef coordinator for Ohio State University Extension and a member of the OSU Extension Beef Team. “One of the most expensive investments in any beef herd is the young cow,” Grimes said. “Heifers require a higher degree of management to maximize their profit potential. “They can be more challenging to...
  6. Farm Science Review visitors can talk one-on-one with agronomists about everything from weed control to cover crops. Photo: FSR

    Get Personalized Advice About Crops at the Farm Science Review

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Got ragweed? Come to the Farm Science Review. Visitors can talk one-on-one with agronomists about everything from weed control to cover crops. The Review, Sept. 20-22, is a three-day trade show for everything agricultural. It features field demonstrations, more than 630 exhibitors, and 180 educational presentations. It also features Ohio State University Extension’s Agronomic Crops Team, who will meet with Review visitors, provide demonstrations and make presentations.  Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, which is the sponsor of the show. Harold Watters, agronomist for college, expects most discussions at the Agronomic Crops Demonstration plots to surround...
  7. Farm Science Review wants to know – what is your FSR? Photo: FSR

    The Farm Science Review Wants Your Selfie

    LONDON, Ohio — If Matt Sullivan, superintendent of the Farm Science Review, were to take a selfie to show what the farm show means to him, it would look east on Friday Avenue, the main drag through the Molly Caren Agricultural Center near London, Ohio. “It would be Wednesday at noon, when crowds are the biggest,” Sullivan said. Behind him, some of the 110,000 to 130,000 people who attend the three-day event would be visiting with exhibitors, checking out the educational programs, and enjoying the milkshakes and pork chops served up by students from Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, sponsor of the show. “My FSR is being able to interact with all of those visitors, see where they came from. They are not just from Ohio,...
  8. veggies on a plate in the form of a funny face

    Chow Line: Turn tables on food ads: Make veggies fun

    We tend to eat a lot of vegetables and fruit at home, not only during meals but for snacks too. But our daughter seems to be getting less interested in “good” food and is asking for more sweets and salty snacks. How can we steer her back to healthy eating? First, good for you for being a good role model for healthful eating. That’s the first, and, some say, the most important step to influencing your daughter’s adoption of healthy habits to last a lifetime. But as you’re finding out, you’re not the only influence on your daughter. It’s nothing new: Food and beverage advertisers spend nearly $15 billion each year targeting children and teens in the U.S. And, recent studies reveal that more than 80 percent of the food advertisements that adults...
  9. food waste in trash can

    Aug. 26 Conference to Help Consumers, Communities Reduce Food Waste; Attend In Person or Online

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — In 2015, the Obama administration announced the nation’s first food waste reduction goal by calling for a 50 percent reduction in waste by the year 2030. With current estimates that 40 percent of U.S. food, worth $165 billion dollars a year, is thrown away, reaching this ambitious target will require a concerted effort, said Brian Roe, the McCormick Professor of Agricultural Marketing and Policy in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. “Reducing food waste is a triple win,” Roe said. “We can improve the environment by reducing and diverting food waste from landfills. We can save households and municipalities money by not having to put waste into a landfill. And, these actions will make...
  10. shopping cart in grocery store aisle

    What GMO Labeling Means for ‘Black Box’ of Food Storage, Distribution: Panel Discussion Sept. 20

    LONDON, Ohio — Foods with labels indicating they were made with genetically modified ingredients are coming soon to a grocery store near you. But what are the implications of GMO labeling for the parts of the food industry that the public seldom sees? “There has been a lot of discussion in the media about whether GMO labels are a good idea or a bad idea,” said Matt Roberts, agricultural economist for the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. “But the truth is more complicated, because, as economists, we need to know the costs and benefits. And one of the things that really hasn’t been discussed well anywhere is what are the impacts of labeling on the food system?” Roberts will oversee a panel...

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