News: News Releases

  1. EPN Event Features New Green Columbia Gas HQ

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — See a new Columbus GreenSpot at the next Environmental Professionals Network breakfast program. And spy the green of the Columbus Clippers’ ballpark while you’re at it. The July 15 event, titled “Using Sustainability and Energy Efficiency to Help Customers and the Community,” is at the new Columbia Gas of Ohio and NiSource Gas Distribution headquarters overlooking Huntington Field in downtown Columbus. It’s from 7:30-9:30 a.m. at 290 W. Nationwide Blvd. in the Arena District. The new building opened last year. It earned Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, certification from the U.S. Green Building Council and is part of Columbus’s GreenSpot sustainability initiative. Speaking at the program...
  2. flooded corn field

    Extended Flooding Kills Some Corn Crops, Prolonged Ponding Could Negatively Impact Crop Performance

    COLUMBUS, Ohio –  Excessive rain and extensive flooding and ponding have taken a toll on corn fields across Ohio, and could leave some growers facing sudden death of their plants now or diseased crops and potential long-term yield loss later, according to an agronomist in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. Even if the flooding and ponding don’t kill some corn crops now, some growers could be faced with fields exhibiting stalk or root rot and stalk lodging later in the season, said Peter Thomison, an Ohio State University Extension agronomist. OSU Extension is the statewide outreach arm of the college. “While above-normal rainfall is not unusual in Ohio during the spring, the amount of rainfall this year has...
  3. children in restaurant with parents across from them

    Chow Line: Eating out? Help kids make healthful choices

    We seem to be eating out more and more. Instead of just ordering for them, I want to teach my children (ages 9 and 11) how to make healthier choices, whether we’re at a sit-down restaurant or going through a drive-thru. Any tips? You’re right to be concerned. A few years ago, the U.S. Department of Agriculture published a study, “How Food Away from Home Affects Children’s Diet Quality.” It found that for children ages 6-18, each meal eaten out contributed an extra 65 calories and lowered diet quality by 4 percent, as measured by an index based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, compared with meals prepared at home. About a third of the higher number calories were due to soft drinks and other sweetened beverages. For older children, the number of extra...
  4. Media Advisory: French Ag Minister to Speak at Ohio State June 27

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — French Agriculture Minister Stéphane Le Foll will offer a free public talk, “Research on Carbon Sequestration in Soils: A Priority for France,” at 11:30 a.m. this Saturday, June 27, in 333 Kottman Hall, 2021 Coffey Rd., on Ohio State’s Columbus campus. Reporters are welcome to attend. The talk is sponsored by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences' Carbon Management and Sequestration Center. CFAES Dean Bruce McPheron will give welcoming remarks. Carbon sequestration is the focus of the forthcoming COP21 meeting to be held in Paris in December.” COP21 is the 2015 UN Climate Change Conference. For questions, contact Mauricio Espinoza at 330-621-6541 or espinoza.15@osu.edu. -30-
  5. Recent rainy weather has left many yards and gardens under water throughout Ohio. (iStock image)

    Recent Rain Affecting Your Garden? Here Are Tips to Help You Weather the Storm

    SPRINGFIELD, Ohio — Recent storms and flooding in most parts of Ohio have taken a toll not just on field crops but also on backyard gardens and landscapes. Pam Bennett, horticulture educator with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University, said wet conditions can lead to three main concerns for gardens: root death, diseases and weeds. “Hopefully by now, the water has drained. If not, you may have some trouble with your plants,” said Bennett, who is also the state Master Gardener Volunteer coordinator for Ohio State University Extension, the college’s outreach arm. “Plant roots need oxygen; they need that air in order to grow. When they sit in water for a period of time, that leads to root rot and lack of...
  6. How to Keep Your Forest Healthy: July 23 Workshop on Stopping Invasive Insects

    CHARDON, Ohio — The Geauga Park District’s Big Creek Park will host a workshop on how to spot and manage invasive forest pests, such as the emerald ash borer, on July 23 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Included will be details on a new threat, the spotted lanternfly, which has been found in Pennsylvania. It attacks, among others, apple, cherry and pine trees. Leading the workshop will be forestry experts from the Ohio Woodland Stewards Program in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. Non-native insects like the Asian longhorned beetle and hemlock woolly adelgid have spread into Ohio and can hurt and kill certain trees, said Kathy Smith, a workshop instructor and the program’s director. And that can harm forests that...
  7. Fish farm. Photo: OSU Extension

    Ohio State Offers Aquaponics Fish Farming Workshop July 10-11

    PIKETON, Ohio – An innovative aquaculture program offered by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University will hold a workshop July 10-11 to provide an in-depth look at the increasingly popular fish farming industry. Held at the Ohio Center for Aquaculture Research and Development at Ohio State University South Centers in Piketon, the workshop will offer current and future fish farmers, and anyone else interested in aquaculture, an opportunity to learn more about managing a fish farming operation, said Estefania James, an Ohio State University Extension aquaculture program coordinator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. The OSU South Centers also are part of the college. Aquaculture -- which includes the breeding,...
  8. Grain C.A.R.T. Photo: OSU Extension

    Ohio State to Hold Grain Bin Rescue Demonstration June 26

    PAULDING, Ohio — Agriculture safety experts with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University will hold a demonstration June 26 to help educate growers on grain bin safety. Ohio State University Extension educators, first responders with the Ohio Fire Academy and Paulding County firefighters will hold the grain bin rescue demonstration at 6:30 p.m. at the Paulding County OSU Extension Office, 503 Fairground Drive in Paulding. The demonstration is part of a two-day training program for farm families, 4-H youth, grain bin elevator employees, firefighters and first responders, said Sarah Noggle, an OSU Extension educator. The program will include demonstrations using the Grain Community Agricultural Rescue Trailer (C.A.R.T.) — Ohio...
  9. image of kids using mobile device with parents in the background

    Family Fundamentals: Too much screen time? A word on setting limits

    My 12-year-old daughter is using our family’s mobile device quite a bit this summer, primarily playing games, watching videos and chatting with friends. My wife and I agree that she’s getting too much screen time, but we disagree on setting limits. Do you have any recommendations? You are not alone. A point of contention in many families these days is limiting children’s time in front of screens — whether they’re televisions, computers, tablets, games or smartphones. In late 2013, the American Academy of Pediatrics set some guidelines based on research saying that the average 8- to 10-year-old spends nearly 8 hours and teens spend more than 11 hours a day in front of a screen. In addition, the academy reported that about 75 percent of 12- to 17-year-olds own...
  10. Ohio’s Extension Leader Retires After Long, Productive Ride

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — This cowboy isn’t riding into the sunset. Come June 30, Keith Smith’s last official day as director of Ohio State University Extension, you will find him on campus bright and early, riding herd over a series of business meetings and sporting his signature cowboy boots. Smith retires after 35 years at The Ohio State University, 23 of them as head of Extension. Leading up to his last few weeks in office, he showed no signs of slowing down. “I promised to stay engaged until June 30, and I am,” Smith said, after working until 9 p.m. the day before. “I’m trying not to leave too many untied ends.” “Keith has led the organization through significant growth and has been a steady guide all the way through his final days as...

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