News: News Releases

  1. Photo: Thinkstock

    The National and Local Grain Markets: Views from an Expert at Farm Science Review

    LONDON, Ohio – Based on early harvest data, Ohio is on track to have a mediocre, at best, grain crop this year, while Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska and South Dakota are all forecast to have record grain yields, according to a grain market expert from The Ohio State University. Matt Roberts, an agricultural economist in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, will offer his 2016 grain market update Sept. 20-21 during Farm Science Review. The annual farm trade show is Sept. 20-22 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center near London, Ohio. Roberts said information from early harvests has begun to be compiled, including important data on what is happening at the state level.    “At Farm Science Review, we typically review national and...
  2. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Free Pumpkin Field Night Sept. 15 Focuses on Jack-O-Lanterns, Pie and Specialty Pumpkins, Among Others

    PIKETON, Ohio — Just in time for the upcoming fall harvest, pumpkin growers can learn more about 70 varieties of jack-o-lantern, colored pumpkins, pie pumpkins and specialty pumpkin cultivars during a Sept. 15 field night offered by horticultural experts with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. Held from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at The Ohio State University South Centers, 1864 Shyville Road, Piketon, the Pumpkin Field Day will also offer growers the newest research on pumpkin pest and disease control, said Charissa Gardner, program assistant with South Centers. “The workshop is designed for anyone that grows pumpkins currently, or anyone that is interested in starting to grow them,” Gardner said. “In addition to...
  3. Sept. 8 Field Day to Feature Ohio State Organic Farming Research

    WOOSTER, Ohio — The Ohio State University’s Organic Food and Farming Education and Research (OFFER) program will hold a free public field day featuring new findings and projects related to certified organic research. The event is from 2 to 6 p.m. Sept. 8 starting at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center’s West Badger farm in northeast Ohio. The tour will then proceed to additional organic research plots located at OARDC’s Fry Farm and Horticulture Unit 1, which together represent more than 75 acres of certified organic research land.  OFFER and OARDC are both part of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. OARDC is the college’s research arm. The field day will highlight various aspects of...
  4. Ohio State ATI Launches New Greenhouse Program

    WOOSTER, Ohio — The Ohio State University Agricultural Technical Institute recently approved a new greenhouse engineering technology specialization in its greenhouse and nursery management major. The program is unique in its engineering approach to traditional horticulture technology education and is the only two-year program in the U.S. for greenhouse engineering technology. Ohio State ATI, located in Wooster in northeast Ohio, is an associate degree-granting unit within the university’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Ohio State ATI ranks first nationally in the granting of associate degrees in agriculture and related sciences. According to the college’s Peter Ling, who collaborated with Ohio State ATI to found the new program, a critical...
  5. Big Benefits for Small Woodlots from Low-Impact Logging?

    LONDON, Ohio — Lee Beers said he saw low-impact logging, lots of it, when living in Maine during graduate school. He says it can work in Ohio, too. “I was surprised at the lack of awareness about this practice in Ohio,” said Beers, who moved here in January to start his job as an educator with Ohio State University Extension in Trumbull County. “This is a common logging practice in New England, and it would have value with Ohio forests.” Compared with full-scale logging, low-impact logging uses smaller and more specialized equipment, he said. The practice has several goals: less erosion and compaction of the soil, less damage to surrounding trees and land, and a smooth start toward healthy regeneration of the forest. “Low-impact logging can be...
  6. Chow Line: Keep safety in mind when packing lunches

    When my children don’t like what’s offered for school lunch, I pack a sandwich and they carry it in a brown paper bag. My kids say most of their friends use insulated bags when they bring their lunch. Is that necessary? It depends on the sandwich. If it contains anything perishable — lunchmeat, for example — then you’re taking a risk. It may be hard to believe, but about 1 in 6 Americans gets food poisoning every year. While most cases aren’t severe enough to be reported, about 128,000 people end up hospitalized. The most frequent cause of foodborne illness, Salmonella, is responsible for about 42,000 reported cases annually, and almost half are infants and school-age children. Young children are generally more at risk than adults, so keep that in...
  7. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Fertilizer Applicator Certification Training Workshop Offered Aug. 29

    BOTKINS, Ohio — Growers will have an opportunity to gain fertilizer applicator certification training at a workshop Aug. 29. Known as Fertilizer Applicator Certification Training (FACT), the training allows farmers and commercial fertilizer applicators to meet the educational requirements of Ohio’s agricultural fertilization law. Passed in 2014, the legislation requires individuals who apply fertilizer to more than 50 acres to become certified by Sept. 30, 2017. Already, Ohio State University Extension has trained more than 10,000 Ohio farmers on best practices to apply fertilizer for optimum crop yield, reduce the risk of nutrient runoff and improve water quality throughout the state. The Aug. 29 three-hour workshop is just one of several training opportunities that will...
  8. Chow Line: Test dairy, nutrition IQ with MyPlate quizzes

    My son, who is 11, says that since butter is made from milk, it should be counted as a dairy food. I know that it’s not dairy, but can you help me explain why? The most important nutrient we get from dairy foods is calcium. Some foods made from milk, such as cheese and yogurt, retain their calcium content, and those foods are counted along with milk as part of the dairy group. However, there are foods made from milk that have little or no calcium. That includes butter, as well as cream, cream cheese and sour cream. These are all very high in saturated fat, which should be limited in a healthy diet. That’s why they’re not considered dairy foods, and they don’t count toward the three cups of dairy foods that anyone who is 9 or older should eat each day. (Speaking...
  9. goose by pond at South Centers

    25 and Counting: South Centers Marks Anniversary with Sept. 15 Open House

    PIKETON, Ohio — For the last quarter-century, a small southern Ohio village has hosted a center with university scientists conducting world-class agricultural research, and area entrepreneurs have thrived thanks to guidance from the center’s expert marketing and development specialists. It was Oct. 1, 1991, when The Ohio State University South Centers first opened its doors. Then known as the Piketon Research and Extension Center, the facility was designed to help Ohio State expand its land-grant mission of providing science-based outreach and engagement in the area. “Having the center here in southern Ohio brings ideas and opportunities to the local region,” said Tom Worley, who started at the center in 2000 and was named director in 2005. “And even though...
  10. Rendering of future OSU Extension Franklin County building

    $5 Million Gift Gives Ohio State Extension New Facility at Waterman Site

    COLUMBUS, Ohio-- A $5 million gift will extend the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The gift creates the Franklin County Extension Building Capital Fund, which will be used for construction and maintenance of new Franklin County Extension offices and learning spaces on Waterman Agricultural and Natural Resources Laboratory. Waterman consists of 261 acres of farmland located northwest of West Lane Avenue and Kenny Road. Waterman is designated for a major renovation into a research, learning and outreach hub. Bringing Franklin County Extension to Waterman will put cutting-edge research at the extension office’s front door. The new office will engage the community in demonstration gardens, large urban farm...

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