Emily Caldwell

University Communications
Focus Areas: 
  1. Different flavors of hard candy – uniform in color – will be used to detect any changes in research participants’ senses of smell and taste. Photo: Shutterstock.com

    Using candy to sniff out probable cases of COVID-19

    COLUMBUS, OHIO–Scientists have proposed that using a cheap and simple product – hard candy – to screen for the loss of taste and smell in populations at risk for COVID-19 exposure may help detect probable positive cases in otherwise asymptomatic people. The Ohio State University research team received $305,000 in National Institutes of Health funding in a competitive bid to develop easy-to-deploy strategies that can identify people who are potentially infected with SARS-CoV-2. While symptoms like fever, chills, a cough and body aches vary widely among COVID-19 patients, an estimated 86% of people who test positive report a loss of smell, “which makes it a much better predictor, especially if it’s sudden loss,” said project co-leader ...
  2. Judit Puskas and Monica Giusti

    Two Ohio State scientists elected to National Academy of Inventors

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Two faculty members in The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have been elected to the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) 2020 class of Fellows. Monica Giusti, professor of food science and technology, and Judit Puskas, professor of food, agricultural and biological engineering, join a class of 175 academic innovators representing universities and governmental or nonprofit research institutes named to the Fellows program this year. They are the 11th and 12th Ohio State inventors to be chosen as NAI Fellows. “The work done by our newest NAI Fellows demonstrates the breadth of research expertise that can be found at Ohio State – and, in this instance, within a single college,...
  3. empty plate

    ​In study, skipping meals is linked to abdominal weight gain

    Research in animals shows spikes, drops in insulin affect liver Editor: This story was released earlier today by University Communications and is also online at news.osu.edu/news/2015/05/19/skipping-meals/. COLUMBUS, Ohio – A new study in animals suggests that skipping meals sets off a series of metabolic miscues that can result in abdominal weight gain. In the study, mice that ate all of their food as a single meal and fasted the rest of the day developed insulin resistance in their livers – which scientists consider a telltale sign of prediabetes. When the liver doesn’t respond to insulin signals telling it to stop producing glucose, that extra sugar in the blood is stored as fat. These mice initially were put on a restricted diet and lost...
  4. Gray wolf

    Plan to Delist Gray Wolf Endangers Other Threatened Species, Researchers Find

    Editor: This story was previously released by Ohio State University’s Office of Research and Innovation Communications, http://ow.ly/s9GYY. COLUMBUS, Ohio – The federal government’s proposal to discontinue protection for the gray wolf across the U.S. could have the unintended consequence of endangering other species, researchers say. As written, scientists assert, the proposed rule would set a precedent allowing the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to declare habitat unsuitable for an endangered animal because a threat exists on the land -- the exact opposite of the service’s mandate to impose regulations that reduce threats against imperiled species. The FWS has “conflated threats with habitat suitability” by stating that U.S. land currently...
  5. James Kinder of Ohio State ATI

    Ohio State ATI Interim Director James Kinder Among 2013 AAAS Fellows

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- James Kinder, interim director of the Ohio State University Agricultural Technical Institute (Ohio State ATI), has been elected as Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), honored by his peers as a significant contributor to the scientific community. Kinder was recognized for his distinguished contributions in reproductive endocrinology research and as an administrator in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Ohio State ATI, located in Wooster, is the college’s associate degree-granting unit. In all, six Ohio State faculty and 388 AAAS members have been elected Fellows this year in recognition of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. New Fellows...
  6. In To Africa: Ohio State Partners with Ethiopia on Major Health Initiative

    Cervical cancer, rabies, food safety among first issues to address COLUMBUS, Ohio -- In a country where cervical cancer kills thousands of women each year and rabid dogs endanger the human population, there is plenty of will, and even money, to fix these problems, but not enough trained people to do it. Those facts concerning Ethiopia are about to change. The African nation has partnered with The Ohio State University to chart a course for a new and healthier future for Ethiopians, and potentially for citizens in neighboring African countries. The first comprehensive One Health Summer Institute, representing a long-term partnership between Ohio State and a number of Ethiopian government agencies, service organizations and academic institutions, is officially under way. Spanning...
  7. stock photo of berries

    Some Health Benefits Of Berries May Not Make It Past Your Mouth

    Editor: This story was released earlier today from Ohio State University's Office of Research and Innovation Communications. COLUMBUS, Ohio – Research has suggested that compounds that give colorful fruits their rich hues, especially berries, promote health and might even prevent cancer. But for the first time, scientists have exposed extracts from numerous berries high in those pigments to human saliva to see just what kinds of health-promoting substances are likely to survive and be produced in the mouth. It’s too early to name the best berry for health promotion based on this initial work. But the researchers have discovered that two families of pigments that provide berries with their colors, called anthocyanins, are more susceptible to degradation in the mouth than...