Tracy Turner

Technical Editor
Focus Areas: 
Chow Line, consumer news, food safety, nutrition.
  1. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Eating fewer trans or saturated fats better choice for heart health

    I’m focusing on improving my nutrition as part of my overall health resolutions for this year. Do you have any tips on how to make heart-healthy food choices? February is a good time to focus on healthy food choices and heart health, as the month was designated American Heart Month by former U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1963. As such, health care advocates, including the American Heart Association, take this time every year to promote consumer awareness of hearth health and the impact that foods can have on your health. This is significant considering that heart disease is the No. 1 killer of American consumers. Limiting unhealthy foods and making wise food choices are important parts of developing and maintaining a heart-healthy lifestyle. One way to do that is by...
  2. A detailed look at what's new on the updated nutrition facts label. Photo: FDA

    Chow Line: New nutrition labels reflect more accurate serving sizes

    There seems to be something different about the nutrition label on some of the foods I’ve purchased lately. Did the labels change? Yes. In fact, the nutrition labels on some foods have changed and will soon change on other food products, thanks to new rules instituted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The FDA announced the updated nutrition label design in 2016 as part of an effort to reflect updated scientific findings to help consumers make better-informed decisions about food choices and maintain healthy diets, the government agency said. One of the biggest changes consumers can expect to see is a larger, bolder typeface for both calories and serving sizes. The typeface will be easier for people to see and read. And the serving sizes have been updated to better...
  3. Photo: A transmission electron micrograph of a coronavirus. Courtesy of Linda Saif.

    News tips and events for the week of Feb. 17

    Tip 1: Coronavirus and Global One Health —Linda Saif, a scientist with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM), will present a talk,“Coronaviruses: Global threats to humans and animals,” as part of Ohio State’s Global One Health initiative monthly webinar Feb. 20, from 9-10 a.m. Saif is known nationally and internationally for her work on enteric viruses, including coronaviruses, which affect food-producing animals, wildlife, and humans. Saif is also a member of Ohio State’s Infectious Diseases Institute (IDI), where she is a co-director for the Viruses and Emerging Pathogens Program. She is also  a member of the National...
  4. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Going out for Valentine’s Day? Pay attention to the details when dining out

    With Valentine’s Day falling on a Friday this year, you’re likely to run into a crowd at almost any restaurant you choose to dine in. In fact, Valentine’s Day is the most popular reservation day of the year for most restaurants, according to the National Restaurant Association. For example, consumers plan to spend $4.3 billion on an evening out this year for Valentine’s day, according to the National Retail Federation.  With that in mind, making sure that your food is cooked thoroughly is just one way to protect yourself when eating out at a restaurant, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  In a Feb. 5 posting from the CDC, consumers are advised to follow these suggestions to prevent developing a foodborne illness from a night out to...
  5. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: The difference between broth and stock

    My dad asked me to pick up chicken stock from the store for a meal that he wants to make for dinner. When I got to the store, I bought chicken broth and brought it home. He sent me back to the store because he said stock and broth aren’t the same thing. But aren’t they really? No, they are not.  Your dad is correct. There is a difference between broth and stock, and depending on which recipe he was making, the difference between the two could have an impact on the outcome of the meal. This is because, generally speaking, broth is lighter and more flavorful, while stock is thicker. To understand the difference, it’s important to understand what stocks and broths are. Stocks and broths are liquids used to make sauces, soups, stews, and other recipes. The...
  6. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Super-safe food for Super Bowl Sunday

    We’re hosting a Super Bowl feast this weekend. Got any tips about how to do so safely?  You’re not alone. Super Bowl Sunday is the second largest food consumption day of the year, second only to Thanksgiving, according to the National Chicken Council. There are several steps you can take to ensure that your guests enjoy the game and the delicious foods you’re serving while not walking away from the buffet with a nasty case of food poisoning. Because your question is very similar to another that was asked in a “Chow Line” column from January 2017, it’s best answered by reissuing that column here.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers several tips to help ensure that your guests have a good meal without the fear of food...
  7. Photo: A transmission electron micrograph of a coronavirus. Courtesy of Linda Saif.

    News tips and events for the week of Jan. 27

    Tip 1: Ohio State experts available for comment on new coronavirus—Scientists with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) can offer insight into the new coronavirus that is being blamed for at least 81 deaths and more than 2,800 confirmed illnesses internationally since December 2019, with at least five cases of coronavirus reported in the United States—in Washington state; Arizona; Los Angeles; Chicago; and Orange County, California. Additionally, at least 100 other people in the United States are under observation in 26 states, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that include the...
  8. Photo: A transmission electron micrograph of a coronavirus. Courtesy of Linda Saif.

    Ohio State experts available for comment on new coronavirus

    WOOSTER, Ohio—Scientists with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) can offer insight into the new coronavirus that is being blamed for at least 26 deaths and more than 830 confirmed illnesses internationally since December 2019, with at least two cases of coronavirus reported this week in the United States—in Washington state and Chicago. And at least an additional 50 people in the United States are under observation in 22 states, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that include the common cold, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and Middle East respiratory syndrome (...
  9. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Binge drinking on the rise in certain populations

    Is there a difference between heavy drinking and binge drinking? And do these have any effect on my health? Yes, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines heavy drinking as the consumption of 15 drinks or more per week for men and 8 or more drinks per week for women. On the other hand, they define binge drinking as consuming five or more drinks for men and four or more drinks for women, in about two hours. A binge drinker is someone who experiences at least one binge-drinking episode during a 30-day period. Per the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, a standard alcoholic drink is equivalent to 12 ounces of beer, which is typically about 5% alcohol; 5 ounces of wine, which is typically 12% alcohol; or 1.5 ounces of hard liquor, which is typically 40%...
  10. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Is drinking more water your New Year’s resolution? If so, here’s how to do it.

    As part of my 2020 New Year’s resolution, I’ve pledged to drink more water this year. Do you have any tips on how I can stick to my goal and keep up my water intake? If drinking more water was one of your New Year’s resolutions, you’re not alone. Not only is increasing the amount of water one drinks one of the top consumer resolutions for 2020, but increased water intake continues to be a growing trend as more people seek to boost their hydration rates as part of a healthy lifestyle. For example, bottled water beat soft drinks as the top beverage in the United States by volume in 2017, with sales increasing 7% over sales in 2016, according to the Beverage Marketing Corporation, a New York-based beverage consulting firm. And on any given day, the average...
  11. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Winter flooding potential leads to food safety concerns

    The forecast this weekend calls for warm temperatures, thunderstorms, and the potential for a couple of inches of heavy rain here in Ohio, even though it’s January! I’ve recently moved into a new home in an area that’s been subject to flash floods. If my home floods, what do I do with the food in my fridge and pantry? Your question is very similar to another that was asked in a “Chow Line” column from May 2017, so it’s best answered by reissuing that column here. If your home becomes flooded, it is important that you throw away any food that might have come into contact with floodwater. That includes cartons of milk, juice, or eggs and any raw vegetables and fruits. In fact, unless they were in a waterproof container, any foods in your home that...
  12. Anne E. Dorrance. Photo: CFAES

    News tips and events for the week of Dec. 16

    Tip 1: Dorrance named associate dean and director of The Ohio State University Wooster campus – Plant pathologist Anne E. Dorrance has been named to the top leadership position at The Ohio State University Wooster campus. On January 1, 2020, she will begin a four-year term as associate dean and director for the Wooster campus and associate director for the Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station in Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Read more here. Tip 2: Growing Hemp in Ohio: Separating Fact from Fiction – Farmers, producers and anyone interested in learning more about the potential for growing hemp, a new crop to Ohio, can attend a day-long workshop Jan. 24 at The Ohio State University...
  13. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Hold the raw, unpasteurized eggs from your holiday recipes

    I love to drink eggnog this time of year, and hollandaise sauce is a rich indulgence that puts me in the holiday mood. While I typically make my own eggnog and hollandaise sauce using raw eggs, this year my wife has asked me to avoid the raw eggs. What’s wrong with using raw eggs in those recipes? Count me in among those hundreds of thousands of consumers who indulge in rich, creamy, delicious eggnog this time of year! In fact, some 135 pounds of eggnog is consumed in this country each year, according to research from Indiana University.  But, if you are making your own eggnog—which is a sweetened, dairy-based drink traditionally made with milk, cream, sugar, whipped eggs, and spices—you should make sure that it is safe to drink. You can do this by using...
  14. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Romaine lettuce alert affects Ohio, other states

    I saw that there’s been another alert about romaine lettuce. How do I know whether what’s in my fridge is part of the impacted varieties? Unless you can verify whether the romaine lettuce that’s in your fridge was NOT harvested from Salinas, California, you should throw it out. That’s per the latest warning from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which issued an updated food safety alert on Dec.4. The alert advises consumers, restaurants, and retailers to avoid eating or selling any romaine lettuce grown in the Salinas, California, growing region. This includes all use-by dates and brands of romaine lettuce from the area.  The warning is the result of the recent multistate outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:...
  15. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: How long is too long for holiday leftovers?

    I typically make a large turkey (22 pounds) and plenty of trimmings because my family loves Thanksgiving leftovers. How many days after the holiday is the food safe to eat? Wow, it sounds like your family really loves turkey, as do I!  Many people often wonder how long it is safe to eat leftovers, not just during the holidays, but at any other time as well. The recommended refrigerated storage time for different foods can vary by food type, but in general, the refrigerated storage time is quite short, said Sanja Ilic, Food Safety State Specialist, Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. For instance, the U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends storing cooked...
  16. Fairport Harbor Lighthouse on the shores of Lake Erie. Photo: Getty Images.

    News tips and events for the week of Nov. 18

    Tip 1: Evaluating Management Options to Reduce Lake Erie Algal Blooms: Researchers with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) will present, “Evaluating Management Options to Reduce Lake Erie Algal Blooms With Models of the Maumee River Watershed” during a 2 p.m. news conference Nov. 21 at the CFAES Agricultural Administration Building in room 250, 2120 Fyffe Road, Ohio State, Columbus, Ohio. The event will answer the question, “If agricultural landowners were to adopt a combination of feasible best management practices, could we reduce phosphorus enough to meet the targets set by the United States and Canada?” The event will include remarks from Jay Martin, an ecological engineering professor with...
  17. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: How to handle diabetes during the holidays

    I was recently diagnosed with diabetes and am not sure how to manage my disease as I go through the holiday season. Do you have any tips on what steps I can take to navigate through the holidays while keeping my diabetes in check? Holidays can present special challenges for those who live with diabetes, particularly as people look for ways to either avoid temptation or make better choices while they navigate all the indulgences of the season, said Jenny Lobb, a family and consumer sciences educator for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Whether it’s dealing with busy schedules, extra stress, family gatherings, or holiday eating, the holiday season...
  18. Photo: Getty Images

    Media Advisory: Ohio State food safety center to hold food safety forum Nov. 14

    Media Advisory What: The Center for Foodborne Illness Research and Prevention (CFI) at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) will hold a food safety forum, “Translating Science Into Policy and Practice: What are the food safety priorities?” Where: Drake Performance and Event Center, 1849 Cannon Drive, on Ohio State’s Columbus campus When: 1–6:30 p.m. Nov. 14 Contact: Barbara Kowalcyk, 614-292-6487, kowalcyk.1@osu.edu Background: Founded as a nonprofit organization in December 2006, CFI brought its 13-year record of protecting public health to Ohio State in September. The center, which is now housed within the CFAES Department of Food...
  19. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: $4.50 a day for healthy foods?

    I want to get a head start on my New Year’s resolution to make healthier food choices, but I really don’t have a lot of money to spend on food besides what I already spend. How can I make better food choices without breaking my meager budget? It’s good that you want to make healthier food choices and aren’t waiting until a specific date on the calendar to make that change. And, contrary to popular belief, healthy food doesn’t have to be expensive. In fact, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, healthy foods are not necessarily more expensive than less healthy ones. In many cases, it depends on how you measure the costs of the foods that you are comparing. For example, the USDA said in a written statement, “fruits and vegetables...
  20. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Growing giant pumpkins

    I took my 8-year-old to a pumpkin show over the weekend and we saw giant, near record-sized pumpkins on display. Now my son wants to grow giant pumpkins like that in our backyard. Is that possible? Well, with the right seed, using the proper growing techniques in the right conditions, maybe. Even first-time growers are capable of growing pumpkins in excess of 400 pounds if the seeds you choose to plant are the Atlantic Giant variety, which are available at numerous garden centers and catalogs, according to Mike Estadt, educator, Ohio State University Extension. “To grow pumpkins in excess of half a ton, it all begins with superior genetics,” Estadt wrote in Growing Giant Pumpkins in the Home Garden, a new Ohioline fact sheet.  Ohioline is OSU...
  21. Photo: Getty Images

    New Ohio State food safety center to hold inaugural event Nov. 14

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—The Center for Foodborne Illness Research and Prevention (CFI) at The Ohio State University will hold its inaugural event, “Translating Science Into Policy and Practice: What are the food safety priorities?” on Nov. 14 from 1–6:30 p.m. at the Drake Performance and Event Center, 1849 Cannon Drive, on the Columbus campus.  The event will include a food safety panel discussion featuring: Mindy Brashears, PhD, Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety, Food Safety and Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture David Goldman, MD, MPH, Chief Medical Officer, Office of Food Policy and Response, U.S. Food and Drug Administration Robert Tauxe, MD, MPH, Director, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental...
  22. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Slow cooker safety

    I put a roast on to cook in my slow cooker and went to work. When I got home, I realized that the power had gone out at my house at some point during the day. I checked my slow cooker and the power was off, but my roast looked like it cooked fully. Can I still eat the roast? Great question! However, I’m sorry to say that unless you are able to tell how long the roast was in the slow cooker without adequate heat, it’s best that you toss it out, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service.   Generally speaking, perishable foods that have been at temperatures of 40 degrees Fahrenheit or higher for two hours or more will need to be discarded to avoid the development of harmful bacteria that could cause a foodborne illness....
  23. Photo: Getty Images

    News tips and events for the week of Oct. 14

    Tip 1: Tax school soon in session: How to deal with the new tax law (Tax Cuts and Jobs Act) for both individuals and businesses is among the topics to be discussed during the upcoming Tax School for Tax Practitioners workshop series offered throughout Ohio in late October, November, and December. Register at go.osu.edu/2019taxschools two weeks prior to the school date and receive the early-bird registration fee of $375. After the school deadline, the fee increases to $425. Registration includes all materials, lunches, and light refreshments. The workshop series is one of two tax education options that Ohio State University Extension is offering this fall. The second option is Ag Tax Issues, a daylong webinar that will be broadcast Dec. 16 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m...
  24. The pawpaw was named Ohio's official native fruit in 2009. (Photo: CFAES)

    Chow line: Pawpaws making a comeback in Ohio, other markets

    What is a pawpaw, and is it healthy for you? The pawpaw is the largest edible fruit that is native to the United States, grown indigenous in some 26 states nationwide including Ohio. The majority of pawpaws are grown from the Great Lakes to the Florida Panhandle, with mid-Atlantic and Midwestern states being the primary growing region. Grown on trees, pawpaws ripen in the fall and are generally harvested from late August to mid-October. Not to be confused with papayas, the skin color of ripe pawpaws can range from green to brown or black on the outside and is yellow on the inside, with a ripe pawpaw about the size of a large potato. The meat of the fruit, which is soft and mushy like an avocado, has been described as tasting a little like a rich, custardy tropical blend of banana,...
  25. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Alternatives to sugar

    I want to lower my sugar intake, so I’m looking for a sugar substitute for my coffee. What are the different types of sweeteners?  First, I want to congratulate you on your decision to lower your sugar intake. Lowering your sugar intake is a wise and healthy choice, as research shows that consuming too much sugar can increase your risk for chronic diseases such as diabetes, some cancers, and heart disease.  If you want to lower your sugar intake from your coffee to zero, you could choose to drink it black.  But, if you’d rather not do that, you aren’t alone. Some two-thirds of coffee drinkers and one-third of tea drinkers add milk, cream, sugar, flavorings, or other additives to their drink, according to a study from the University...

Pages