Tracy Turner

Technical Editor
Focus Areas: 
Chow Line, consumer news, food safety, nutrition.
  1. NW Ohio Farmers: Sign Up for Project Designed to Improve Ohio Water Quality

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Researchers with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University are looking for farmers in the Maumee River Basin to volunteer for a study to determine the best management practices to reduce nutrient runoff while increasing crop yields. Greg LaBarge, an Ohio State University Extension field specialist and a leader of Ohio State’s Agronomic Crops Team, is leading the Farmer Phosphorus Water Quality Monitoring Project. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. The data will be used to quantify economic and environmental nutrient losses associated with phosphorus runoff, LaBarge said. The goal is to determine the best tools to target high-risk fields and design the most effective practices to maintain crop...
  2. marestail

    Weed ID Is the Key

    SOUTH CHARLESTON, Ohio — It was a contest to see who knows their weed. Or weeds, to be precise. College students from across the U.S. and Canada competed in the National Weed Science Contest July 20-21 at the Western Agricultural Research Station in South Charleston. The program was part of a competition to see who has bragging rights as the best student weed scientists, said Bruce Ackley, an Ohio State University Extension program specialist in weed science. The station is part of the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms, respectively, of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. More than 225 undergraduate and graduate students from over 25 universities...
  3. Photo: Thinkstock

    Northwest Ohio Precision Ag Day is Aug. 4

    WAUSEON, Ohio – With increased interest in the benefits of precision nutrient management, the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University is offering a day-long workshop that focuses on precision agriculture. The Northwest Ohio Precision Ag Technology Day is Aug. 4 from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Fulton County Fairgrounds, 8591 State Route 108, in Wauseon, Ohio. The event will offer farmers and crop consultants a chance to focus on nutrient management, said Eric Richer, an Ohio State University Extension educator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college.  Topics include: ·      Soil Phosphorus Recommendations ·      Soil Nitrogen Rate and Source Considerations...
  4. Ohio State Improving Water Quality, One Farm at a Time

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Since last fall, 6,586 growers and producers responsible for farming some 1 million acres of Buckeye State farmland have gone through fertilizer applicator certification training offered by researchers from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University as part of the college’s efforts to continue to improve Ohio water quality. Taught by Ohio State University Extension’s Agriculture and Natural Resources program staff, the training is designed to help farmers increase crop yields using less fertilizer more efficiently, thus reducing the potential for phosphorus runoff into the state’s watersheds. The ultimate goal of the training is to keep nutrient runoff from fertilizers, especially phosphorus,...
  5. Nearly All of CFAES Grads Report Positive Job Outlook

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ninety-two percent of recent graduates of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University report either having a job or being enrolled in an advanced degree program within six months of graduation. That’s according to a recent survey by school officials that found that of those graduates, 77.2 percent reported accepting positions in Ohio, which contributes to the state’s overall economic strength, said Adam Cahill, career development manager for the college. The remaining graduates reported accepting positions in 25 other states and three other countries, Cahill said. “The fact that our students have secured positions in multiple states and internationally shows that our programs are well known and...
  6. Fish farm. Photo: OSU Extension

    Ohio State Offers Aquaponics Fish Farming Workshop July 10-11

    PIKETON, Ohio – An innovative aquaculture program offered by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University will hold a workshop July 10-11 to provide an in-depth look at the increasingly popular fish farming industry. Held at the Ohio Center for Aquaculture Research and Development at Ohio State University South Centers in Piketon, the workshop will offer current and future fish farmers, and anyone else interested in aquaculture, an opportunity to learn more about managing a fish farming operation, said Estefania James, an Ohio State University Extension aquaculture program coordinator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. The OSU South Centers also are part of the college. Aquaculture -- which includes the breeding,...
  7. Grain C.A.R.T. Photo: OSU Extension

    Ohio State to Hold Grain Bin Rescue Demonstration June 26

    PAULDING, Ohio — Agriculture safety experts with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University will hold a demonstration June 26 to help educate growers on grain bin safety. Ohio State University Extension educators, first responders with the Ohio Fire Academy and Paulding County firefighters will hold the grain bin rescue demonstration at 6:30 p.m. at the Paulding County OSU Extension Office, 503 Fairground Drive in Paulding. The demonstration is part of a two-day training program for farm families, 4-H youth, grain bin elevator employees, firefighters and first responders, said Sarah Noggle, an OSU Extension educator. The program will include demonstrations using the Grain Community Agricultural Rescue Trailer (C.A.R.T.) — Ohio...
  8. Flooded soybean field. Photo: Thinkstock

    OSU Expert: Extended Flooding from Tropical Storm Bill Remnants Could Drown Soybean Crops

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – With many soybean fields across Ohio already dealing with wet soils from earlier rains, the flooding impact from the remnants of Tropical Storm Bill could leave some growers with diseased crops or facing yield loss. In fact, if soybean crops at the V2-V3 growth stage are flooded for three days, growers could face a 20 percent yield loss, said Laura Lindsey, a field crops expert in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. Growers with soybean fields flooded for six days could stand to lose up to 93 percent of their crops’ yield potential, said Lindsey, a soybean and small grains specialist with Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the college’s outreach arm. “Things are a little bit...
  9. Potato Leafhopper. Photo: OSU Extension

    Storm Fronts Increase Potential for Potato Leafhopper in Ohio Alfalfa Crops

    WOOSTER, Ohio – With each storm front that races north into Ohio from the Gulf states unleashing torrents of wind and rain from now through the summer, the chance also increases for Buckeye state alfalfa growers to face their crop’s biggest threat — potato leafhoppers. These bright green wedge-shaped insects can cause hopper burn on leaves, which can result in stunted alfalfa plants and can cause a significant economic impact to alfalfa growers, said an entomologist with The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.  The damage could cause significant yield loss and impact the plants’ nutritional value, said Andy Michel, an Ohio State University Extension pest expert. As a result, growers need to start...
  10. Photo: Thinkstock

    OSU Experts Offer Beef Quality Assurance Training Workshop June 29

    CIRCLEVILLE, Ohio – Ohio cattle producers can learn sound management practices and guidelines for beef cattle production during a Beef Quality Assurance training workshop offered June 29 by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. The workshop is targeted toward any cattle producer who is interested in learning proper management techniques to ensure a safe and wholesome beef product for consumers, said John Grimes, beef coordinator for Ohio State University Extension and a member of the OSU Extension Beef Team. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. The training, which be held on a farm at 26450 State Route 104, Circleville, will offer participants live demonstrations of basic quality assurance practices, Grimes said....
  11. Head scab. Photo: OSU Extension

    Risk for Scab is Moderate to High for Some Ohio Wheat Growers This Week

    WOOSTER, Ohio – Wheat growers across Ohio whose plants are at or near the flowering growth stage are at a moderate to high risk for Fusarium head blight development, said a wheat expert from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. The concern is highest for growers in northwest Ohio for development of Fusarium head blight in wheat, also called head scab, said Pierce Paul, an Ohio State University Extension wheat specialist. The wet, humid conditions experienced recently across the region are cause for concern for scab development on wheat at or near the flowering stage this week, said Paul, who is also a plant pathologist with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.  OSU Extension and OARDC are...
  12. milk and outdoors

    Enjoy Breakfast on the Farm, Learn About Food Production

    WAUSEON, Ohio – Ever wondered where your food comes from or how a dairy farm operates? An event designed to answer those questions and more will be held June 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Sandland Dairy Farm, 4397 County Road EF in Swanton, Ohio. Called Breakfast on the Farm, the event was organized to provide consumers a firsthand look at modern food production, said Eric Richer, an Ohio State University Extension educator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. The event allows the community to visit local farming operations, have a close-to-home agricultural experience, and interact with farm families who provide a wholesome food supply for Ohio and the world, Richer said. Registration...
  13. Soybean. Photo: Thinkstock

    How to Evaluate Emerging Soybeans

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – With the majority of soybeans now planted in Ohio and some plants beginning to emerge, growers statewide should evaluate soybean stands to determine if their crops are doing well or if they may need to consider replanting. With high costs associated with replanting, most growers should carefully weigh all options before deciding to replant, said a field crops expert in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. While most soybean growers across Ohio report good stands, a few growers are seeing damping-off and uneven emergence, said Laura Lindsey, a soybean and small grains specialist with Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the college’s outreach arm. “If soybean emergence is uneven,...
  14. Hops. Photo: Thinkstock

    More Opportunities to Take Hops Production Tours

    PIKETON, Ohio — Next Wednesday is the deadline for growers and others interested in learning more about hops research at The Ohio State University to register to attend the June 5 tours of hop fields in Piketon and Wooster, organizers said. The Hop Production to Enhance Economic Opportunities for Farmers and Brewers project offers tours of its hop research trials at the Ohio State University South Centers in Piketon and at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster. Participants can learn basic information on how to get started in hops production as well as what resources may be available to help growers, said Charissa McGlothin, program assistant with the South Centers. OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms, respectively, of Ohio State...
  15. Fusarium Head Blight. Photo: Ohio State University Extension

    OSU Wheat Expert: Some Wheat Crops at Risk for Scab Development

    WOOSTER, Ohio – Southwest Ohio wheat growers with early flowering fields planted with highly scab-susceptible varieties are at moderate risk for Fusarium head blight development this week, said a wheat expert from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. And while northern Ohio is at a high threat for Fusarium head blight, also called head scab, growers there don’t need to panic because much of their wheat is probably not at the critical flowering stage yet, said Pierce Paul, an Ohio State University Extension wheat specialist. Much of Ohio’s wheat has progressed considerably over the last week and is now heading out in some fields, said Paul, who is also a plant pathologist with the Ohio Agricultural...
  16. Podcast Demonstrates How to Identify Wheat Growth Stages

    WOOSTER, Ohio — A wheat expert from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University has created a series of YouTube videos that demonstrate how growers can identify the various growth stages of wheat crops. The series is designed as an online tool to help wheat growers identify various stages of wheat growth and to know what management strategies can be used during each growth stage, said Pierce Paul, an Ohio State University Extension wheat researcher. The videos, which begin with wheat at Feekes Growth Stage 6, will show all the growth stages of wheat throughout the growing season, said Paul, who is also a plant pathologist with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.  OSU Extension and OARDC are the...
  17. Scott Shearer, chair of CFAES’s Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, examines a drone at Farm Science Review. Photo: Farm Science Review.

    2015 Farm Science Review Takes On Sharp Edge

    LONDON, Ohio – Farmers and producers can gain a sharper edge and glean cutting-edge ideas from experts from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University during this year’s Farm Science Review Sept. 22-24 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, Ohio. The Review will again emphasize the best agricultural research, resources, information and access for farmers, said Chuck Gamble, who manages the Review. Last year, the Review offered 180 educational presentations and opportunities presented by Ohio State University Extension educators, specialists and faculty, as well as Purdue University educators. Farm Science Review is all about learning new tips, techniques and information to help producers increase their farm operation...
  18. Hay bales wrapped in cellophane. Photo: Thinkstock

    Proper Hay Storage Techniques Can Increase Value, Decrease Quality Losses

    PIKETON, Ohio – Producers who follow the proper techniques for hay storage will find their crops will retain more value and suffer fewer losses, said a beef cattle expert from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. Considering that hay production is very costly, producers may want to take special care to store hay correctly to ensure it retains quality, said John Grimes, beef coordinator for Ohio State University Extension and a member of the OSU Extension Beef Team. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. According to the OSU Extension 2013 enterprise budget, at 3 tons per acre, grass hay costs $112.77 per ton to produce. Alfalfa, at 4 tons per acre, costs $133.02 per ton, Grimes said. “Hay is an expensive crop...
  19. Pasture Management Workshop is May 19 and 21

    OWENSVILLE, Ohio – Producers who use rotational grazing may find their pastures will offer years more use than pastures that don’t use that grazing system, says a pasture expert with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. Rotational grazing is a system in which animals graze on multiple fields, giving each field a rest from feeding for weeks at a time. The practice has become a more popular management tool among producers as its sustainability benefits become more widely known, said Gigi Neal, Ohio State University Extension educator in agriculture and natural resources and co-leader of OSU Extension’s Ohio Women in Agriculture team. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. “Rotational grazing gives...
  20. Cocoon Of Alfalfa Weevil. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Warmer Weather Increases Feeding Potential for Alfalfa Weevil in Ohio

    WOOSTER, Ohio – The return of hotter weather to the region also makes cozy conditions for alfalfa weevil larvae to grow and start eating away at alfalfa crops, with the potential to cause significant damage. The pest, which causes major alfalfa damage in its larval stages, should only be treated if it grows to populations large enough to cause economic loss to growers, said an entomologist with Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The high temperatures experienced across Ohio recently have caused alfalfa weevil larvae to develop rapidly, said Andy Michel, an Ohio State University Extension pest expert. As a result, growers need to start scouting now for the pest, said Michel, who also has an appointment with the Ohio...
  21. container gardening on an apartment terrace

    Containers Let Gardeners Plant Flowers, Vegetables in Small Spaces

    SPRINGFIELD, Ohio — Got a small space but still want to plant succulent tomatoes, leafy vegetables or beautiful blooming plants? No problem, says Pam Bennett, Ohio State University Extension horticulture educator and director in Clark County. Apartment dwellers or those with a small backyard can still grow their own flowers and vegetables as long as they choose the right plant and place it in the right location, said Bennett, who is also the statewide Master Gardener Volunteer Program coordinator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Small landscapes, like a small backyard in the city or a patio, can still yield homegrown bounty as long as the grower uses the right container, soil, water...
  22. Black cutworm

    Black Cutworms, Armyworms Becoming Active in Some Ohio Fields

    WOOSTER, Ohio — Warmer weather and newly emerging corn coupled with reports of large populations of black cutworms and armyworms reported last month in Indiana and Kentucky means Ohio growers could start to find larvae from these pests in their fields over the next few weeks. Now that the region is experiencing more suitable planting days, growers could see some fields with heavy feeding by these pests as soon as the second or third week of May, an entomologist with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University said. Black cutworms, which are migratory pests, have been reported in the neighboring states of Indiana and Kentucky in significant numbers in traps set up by entomologists to determine the number of moths migrating up from the...
  23. Ohio State Offers Strawberry Field Night May 21

    PIKETON, Ohio – Robotic strawberry pickers on the farm? Researchers in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University are testing a new prototype robotic sensor technology that can assist farmers in strawberry production, potentially saving growers up to $10,000 per acre in labor harvesting costs. Although researchers at Ohio State are still testing this new technology to determine if it is economically feasible for farmers to adopt, it could be a significant boost to strawberry farmers, said Brad Bergefurd, a horticulturist with Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. “The potential benefit for using technology like this is significant in reducing labor costs and increasing farm...
  24. Soybean. Photo: Thinkstock

    OSU Expert: Check for Potential Cold Snap Injury in Wheat

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Now is the time for growers to check their wheat crops to see if the recent cold snap that hit the region last month has injured susceptible plants, a field crops expert in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University said. With temperature that hit near or below freezing during the week of April 20 in some parts of Ohio, wheat growers in affected areas may consider checking their crops for potential injury, said Laura Lindsey, a soybean and small grains specialist with Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the college’s outreach arm. Depending on the wheat’s growth stage and how cold the temperatures were, some plants could have been negatively impacted by the freeze, Lindsey said, noting that...
  25. Cereal Rye

    Cover Crops Are Viable Option for Livestock Supplemental Feed

    WOOSTER, Ohio — Producers who want to use the cover crops they planted last fall as supplemental feed for their livestock may want to may want to harvest these crops quickly before the plants get too mature and the feed quality declines, says a forage expert from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.  So says Rory Lewandowski, agriculture and natural resources educator for the college’s outreach arm, Ohio State University Extension. Although cover crops are typically planted to control erosion and improve soil structure and health, they can also be a good option as supplemental forage for livestock, he said. “There are a number of dairy farmers who take a cutting off of cover crops that are planted in the...

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