Tracy Turner

Technical Editor
Focus Areas: 
Chow Line, consumer news, food safety, nutrition.
  1. Grain bins. (Photo: Thinkstock)

    Lower Crop Prices Make Grain Marketing More Important

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Growers wanting to brush up on their grain marketing skills or those who want to learn how to improve their farm operation’s profitability can participate in a series of online grain marketing courses taught by experts from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Grain Marketing in Challenging Times, to be offered Feb. 3, Feb. 10, Feb. 17, Feb. 24 and March 3, will offer farmers and growers proven tips and techniques to improve marketing skills, said Chris Bruynis, an Ohio State University Extension educator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. With lower crop prices forecast for next year, grain marketing will be one of the more critical decisions farm managers will have to make this year, said...
  2. Hops cones for beer production. (Photo:Thinkstock)

    Ohio Hops Conference is Feb. 5-6, 2015

    WOOSTER, Ohio – It’s the next big thing in Ohio agriculture as more beverage producers seek Ohio-grown hops for their craft brews. Interest in growing hops in Ohio continues to increase among both established and potential hops growers as well as brewery industry insiders, experts say, and the income potential for hops growers is significant. To help growers and anyone interested in hops learn more about Ohio hops and the Ohio craft brewing industry, a conference and trade show on how to get into the hops business will be held Feb. 5-6, 2015 in the Fisher Auditorium and Shisler Conference Area, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, Ohio, on the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) campus. The Hops Conference and Trade Show will feature detailed information on the...
  3. (Photo: Thinkstock)

    12 Days of Experts: Farmers, Don’t Wait for New Year’s to Resolve Farm Bill Questions

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Top New Year’s resolutions typically include pledges to lose weight, exercise more, get organized or quit smoking. But one New Year’s resolution farmers and farm land owners may want to include on their list is to make sure they understand all of the factors they should consider before making decisions about crop programs offered as part of the 2014 farm bill, according to a farm policy expert with Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. That’s especially true this year, because farm bill commodity programs have the potential to make significant payments for the first time in several years due to low prices and revenue for corn, soybeans and wheat, says Carl Zulauf, an agricultural economics...
  4. Livestock producers need to be thinking now about how they’ll keep their animals warm when the temperatures drop. (Photo: Thinkstock)

    12 Days of Experts: Livestock May Need Extra Feed in Colder Weather to Keep Warm

    WOOSTER, Ohio – While the weather outside isn’t frightful – yet – livestock producers still need to be thinking now about how they’ll keep their animals warm when the temperatures drop, wind chills rise and it starts to snow, snow, snow. Colder winter weather means producers need to be aware of increased livestock energy requirements to ensure their animals are able to withstand harsh conditions outdoors, said Rory Lewandowski, an Ohio State University Extension agriculture and natural resources educator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm for Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.  Cold temperatures, low wind chills and muddy conditions can significantly increase the energy required by livestock...
  5. Cereal rye cover crop (Photo: OSU Extension)

    Cover Crops Can Improve Soil Health, Water Quality and Yields

    OTTAWA, Ohio – Farmers who add cover crops to their fields not only can help improve Ohio’s water quality, they can also cut input costs and improve their soil’s health. Growers who plant cover crops — including oilseed radish, cereal rye, Austrian winter pea and crimson clover — can also expect to reduce soil erosion and cut down on nutrient losses, according to Jim Hoorman, a soil expert with Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Hoorman, an Ohio State University Extension educator and an assistant professor studying cover crops and water quality issues, will offer a workshop for both growers who want get started planting cover crops and those who want to expand their knowledge on the benefits of cover...
  6. Agriculture economists to offer outlook on what to expect in the 2015 grain market.(Photo:Thinkstock)

    Ohio State to Host Grain Symposium Dec. 18

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Farmers wondering what questions they should consider before making decisions on the new Farm Bill crop programs, or those wanting to get an idea about what to expect in the 2015 grain market, can find out answers to those issues and more during a Dec. 18 grain symposium hosted by Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The symposium will bring together farmers, researchers and industry experts who will offer insight into key agricultural issues, including Matt Roberts, an Ohio State University Extension economist who is helping to organize the event. Roberts will also present an update on the grain market for the coming year. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. The event is from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec....
  7. The use of unmanned aerial vehicles in agriculture is just one issue to be discussed during new law webinar series. (Photo: Thinkstock)

    Ohio State Webinar Series Addresses Food, Agricultural and Environmental Law Issues

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – As the use of unmanned aerial vehicles becomes more prevalent in agriculture, understanding the laws and regulations on the use of such devices is paramount, experts say. To help provide guidance and understanding of the legal issues surrounding UAVs, Ohio State University Extension’s Agricultural and Resource Law program will discuss the topic in the first of a series of free webinars beginning Dec. 12, said Peggy Hall, Ohio State University Extension’s agricultural and resource law field specialist. The webinars, which will focus on pressing regional and national agricultural law issues, are intended both for law practitioners and those in the agriculture community, said Hall, who is also an assistant professor for OSU Extension. OSU Extension is...
  8. CFAES is offering free monthly tours of its hops fields in Wooster and Piketon, where specialists are studying new production and management techniques. (Photo: Thinkstock)

    First Friday Tours: Hops Production

    PIKETON, Ohio – The new, innovative Ohio hops research program offered by Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences is offering free monthly tours of its hops fields in Wooster and Piketon, where specialists are studying new production and management techniques. The Hops Production to Enhance Economic Opportunities for Farmers and Brewers project at the Ohio State University South Centers in Piketon is offering early-stage growers, advanced growers and anyone else interested in hops production an opportunity to tour the hops research trials at the Piketon facility. The free tours are designed to be mini-workshops to provide basic information on getting started in hops production and what resources are available for growers, said...
  9. CCA Exam prep course to be offered by CFAES agronomists.

    Certified Crop Adviser Exam Prep Course Offered by OSU Extension Agronomics Team

    SIDNEY, Ohio – Studying for the Certified Crop Adviser Exam may soon be a little easier thanks to a prep course offered by agronomists with Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. The study session is designed to prepare people who plan to take the Certified Crop Adviser exam by providing a two-day course that will touch on many of the topics that will be addressed in the exam, said Harold Watters, an Ohio State University Extension agronomy field specialist and coordinator of the university’s Agronomic Crops Team.  OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. Taught by members of the university’s agronomics crops team, this is not a “crash course” that covers all of the information that will be on...
  10. Farmers markets are just one way producers can market to consumers. (Photo: Thinkstock)

    Free Webinars Available for Growers and Producers to Enhance Marketing, Improve and Expand Sales

    PIKETON, Ohio – Growers and producers — have you ever wondered how to go about marketing your business and products to consumers? Would you like to know the steps to take now to help position your food business for success in the upcoming year? Answers to these questions and more are available to growers, producers and anyone in the agriculture and food industry through two new free webinars offered by food and agriculture marketing experts from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The webinars are designed to teach participants how to effectively use direct marketing as a way to improve their businesses’ financial bottom lines and to potentially increase their customer bases, said Charissa McGlothin, program...
  11. Mike Hogan

    Hogan Named President of the National Association of County Agricultural Agents

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – An Ohio State University Extension educator has been named president of the National Association of County Agricultural Agents. Mike Hogan, who is also an associate professor with OSU Extension and a sustainable agriculture coordinator, was recently elected president of the national professional extension organization. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The 5,784 member association, which is based in Illinois, works to strengthen and support the work of extension educators and to promote and support the agriculture industry. As president of the organization, Hogan said he plans to mark the organization’s 100th-year anniversary in 2015 by reflecting on where the...
  12. Mike Hogan

    Hogan Named President of the National Association of County Agricultural Agents

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – An Ohio State University Extension educator has been named president of the National Association of County Agricultural Agents.   Mike Hogan, who is also an associate professor with OSU Extension and a sustainable agriculture coordinator, was recently elected president of the national professional extension organization. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The 5,784 member association, which is based in Illinois, works to strengthen and support the work of extension educators and to promote and support the agriculture industry. As president of the organization, Hogan said he plans to mark the organization’s 100th-year anniversary in 2015 by reflecting on where the...
  13. The Farm to School Program works to ensure that students pre-K through college have increased access to locally produced nutritious food. (Photo: Thinkstock)

    Farm to School Workshop is Dec. 5

    YELLOW SPRNGS, Ohio – As efforts continue to expand the successful Farm to School Program, which works to connect food producers and school districts to provide fresh, local foods to students, a workshop Dec. 5 can provide farmers and school districts information on how to get started. Offered by Ohio State University Extension, the workshop is targeted toward educators, farmers, food producers, businesses and anyone else interested in beginning or expanding a Farm to School program or other related activities, said Rebecca Supinger, an Ohio State University Extension educator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. One goal of the workshop is to connect farmers looking for school districts to...
  14. Manure is a common source of nutrients. (Photo: Thinkstock)

    Free Workshops Offered on Developing Nutrient Management Plans

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Four workshops designed to teach Certified Crop Advisers how to help farmers develop nutrient management plans will be offered by agronomists with Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The daylong Software for Development Nutrient Management Plans workshops were devised to assist CCAs in learning software to help them develop nutrient management plans for their clients that meet the criteria for the Natural Resources Conservation Service Environmental Quality Incentives Program (NRCS-EQIP), said Greg LaBarge, an Ohio State University Extension field specialist and one of the leaders of Ohio State’s Agronomic Crops Team. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. With water quality...
  15. Knowing some simple safety precautions to take during harvesting is critical for farmers to reduce the potential for injuries.(Photo: Thinkstock)

    Fall Harvest Requires Increased Focus on Safety

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Working long hours without an adequate amount of sleep is just one example of how farmers can increase their risk of injury during harvest, a safety expert with Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences said. Knowing some simple safety precautions to take during harvesting is critical for farmers to reduce the potential for injuries, said Andy Bauer, an Ohio State University Extension agricultural health and safety professional. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. Harvesting is a time when farm workers are continually moving from one piece of equipment to another, Bauer said.  This is a time when farmers should take extra precautions to prevent falls when working around farm equipment and in the...
  16. Producers should be aware that acorns can cause kidney failure in their animals, particularly in cattle and sheep. (Photo: Thinkstock)

    OSU Extension: Acorn Poisoning a Potential Threat to Cattle, Sheep

    LANCASTER, Ohio – The increase in this year’s fall acorn crop means that livestock producers who have oak trees in their pastures need to be on the lookout -- acorns from these trees could cause kidney failure in their animals, particularly in cattle and sheep. Acorn poisoning can be a significant issue for producers, especially in feeder calves that are more susceptible to developing kidney failure after ingesting acorns, said Stan Smith, an Ohio State University Extension program assistant in agriculture and natural resources.  OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. In fact, producers with oak trees in their pastures may want to consider moving their herd away from the...
  17. Cereal rye is a popular cover crop. (Photo: OSU Extension)

    Ohio No-Tillage Conference is Dec. 3

    PLAIN CITY, Ohio – With issues concerning water quality a high priority in Ohio, managing fertilizer and planting cover crops are some of the ways farmers can help improve the condition of the state’s water, according to experts with Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. That will be the focus of the Dec. 3 Ohio No-Till Conference that will feature presentations from farmers and crop consultants, along with researchers and educators from Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms, respectively, of the college. The conference will allow farmers to hear in-depth discussions from experts in the field who will draw upon...
  18. Farm buildings (Photo: Thinkstock)

    How to Determine Fair Price for Farm Building Rentals

    JEFFERSON, Ohio – Farmers, producers and landowners who have agricultural buildings on their property they are no longer using can turn the vacant space into extra farm income, according to experts with Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Whether it is a farm building or livestock facility, farmers who want to put unused space into service to generate additional farm income first need to know how to go about creating a leasing arrangement and how to determine an appropriate rental price, said David Marrison, an Ohio State University Extension educator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. “Many farmers may want to rent out buildings on their properties, but sometimes it’s hard to put a number on that, so...
  19. Corn field after harvest. (Photo: Thinkstock)

    OSU Expert: Corn Stalks Are An Inexpensive Feed Source

    WOOSTER, Ohio – Livestock producers looking for a relatively easy and inexpensive feed source can turn to harvested cornfields for the answer. The residue left on the field after harvesting corn can be used to meet the nutrient needs of ruminant livestock in early to mid-gestation, according to a forage expert from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.  As the corn harvest continues, producers shouldn’t overlook corn stalks as a viable feed resource, said Rory Lewandowski, agriculture and natural resources educator for the college's outreach arm, Ohio State University Extension. “After the combine goes through the field, the residue that is left includes the stalk, husks, leaves, corn kernels and...
  20. Livestock mortality composting

    OSU Extension Offers Livestock Mortality Composting Certification Workshop Nov. 19

    OTTAWA, Ohio – Poultry, dairy, swine, beef cattle and other livestock producers wanting to learn economically and environmentally beneficial ways to handle the death of their animals can earn livestock mortality composting certification through a course offered by experts from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Livestock producers all have to deal with animal mortality at some point on their farms whether the death is the result of illness, old age, natural disasters or birthing problems, said Dale Ricker, on Ohio State University Extension swine program specialist. While producers can choose any one of four state-approved methods for disposing of dead livestock in Ohio, composting is the most cost-effective because it can be...
  21. Pesticide applicators can earn recertification credits to renew their pesticide licenses. (Photo:Thinkstock)

    Ohio State Offers Commercial Pesticide Applicator Recertification Conferences

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Pesticide applicators can earn recertification credits to renew their pesticide licenses during any of a series of conferences offered by Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and the Ohio Department of Agriculture beginning in January 2015. The 2015 Ohio Commercial Pesticide Applicator Recertification conferences are designed to help applicators fulfill Ohio’s commercial applicator requirement of five hours of training in a single day, said Mary Ann Rose, program director for Ohio State University Extension’s Ohio Pesticide Safety Education Program. Recertification credits are available in all of Ohio’s commercial applicator categories, she said. The conferences will for the first time offer...
  22. New Midwest Cover Crops Guide Available to Help Growers Improve Water Quality, Soil Quality

    OTTAWA, Ohio – Soil researchers and educators from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences have collaborated on a newly updated Midwest Cover Crops Guide that can help growers learn how to improve the state’s water quality while improving soil health, increasing yields, lowering input costs and earning higher farm income. Adding cover crops to field crops production can not only improve soil health, it can also benefit the environment, increase water quality and lower production costs, said Jim Hoorman, an Ohio State University Extension educator and an assistant professor studying cover crops, soil health and water quality issues. Hoorman, along with OSU Extension educators Rafiq Islam, Alan Sundermeier, Curtis Young, Sarah...
  23. ‘Science of Soil Health’ Videos Feature OSU Extension Experts

    OTTAWA, Ohio – Soil researchers across the Midwest, including agronomists and scientists from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, want to help growers unlock the secrets of soil health to improve yields, lower input costs and increase farm income. A new series of YouTube videos, called “The Science of Soil Health,” is designed to provide new insight into how to improve soil health while benefiting the environment and lowering production costs, said Jim Hoorman, an Ohio State University Extension educator and an assistant professor studying cover crops and water quality issues. Hoorman, along with Alan Sundermeier, an OSU Extension educator who specializes in agronomic crop production, participated in the series. OSU...
  24. 2014 Guide on Corn, Soybean, Wheat and Alfalfa Available for Growers

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – With wet weather continuing to create harvest and planting delays, a new guide developed by agronomists from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences is available to help growers check their crops’ development. The 2014 Corn, Soybean, Wheat and Alfalfa Field Guide is now available for $12.50 and can be purchased through the Ohio State University Extension eStore or ordered from OSU Extension county offices. The guide is an excellent tool in a new, larger, easier-to-read format that can be used by scouts, crop advisors and farmers when they’re scouting their fields, said Harold Watters, an OSU Extension agronomy field specialist and coordinator of the university’s Agronomic Crops Team. The...
  25. Chickweed

    Weed Specialist: Try to Apply Fall Herbicide Treatments Before December

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Now is a good time for growers to apply herbicide treatments to their fields to control weeds and help ensure a good start for spring planting. In fact, anytime between now and the week of Thanksgiving is a good time for fall herbicide applications, according to a researcher from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Although growers may be busy with harvest, now is the time to start thinking about next spring and how to control the weeds that can have a negative impact on planting, said Mark Loux, an Ohio State University Extension weed specialist. OSU Extension is the statewide outreach arm of the college. While some growers have applied herbicide treatments into late December, herbicide application...

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