Tracy Turner

Technical Editor
Focus Areas: 
Chow Line, consumer news, food safety, nutrition.
  1. Ohio State University to Offer Lamb Marketing Course Dec. 17-18

    WOOSTER, Ohio – Sheep producers can learn innovative new techniques to produce consistent, high quality lamb and how to better market their specialty meats during a two-day course Dec. 17-18. The course will be taught by livestock experts from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and industry experts. The Lamb 509 short course is designed to help producers increase sales and improve their financial bottom line through hands-on training in the value-determining factors that influence prices received for market lambs and lamb products, said Roger A. High, an Ohio State University Extension state sheep program specialist and executive director of the Ohio Sheep Improvement Association (OSIA).  Sponsored by OSU Extension...
  2. Ohio State University to Offer Shepherd’s Symposium Dec. 14

    WOOSTER, Ohio – Sheep and goat producers can gain insight into nutrient management and how to better market and increase demand for their products at the Buckeye Shepherd’s Symposium Dec. 14.  Sponsored by Ohio State University Extension, the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), the Ohio Sheep Improvement Association (OSIA) and the Ohio Sheep and Wool Program, as well as other industry partners, the day-long symposium is part of an ongoing effort to help sheep and goat producers continue to improve their operations, said Roger A. High, OSIA executive director and OSU Extension state sheep program specialist. The program will be led by experts from industry and from Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. OSU...
  3. Ohio AgrAbility to Host Statewide Aging Farmers Workshops

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Aging farmers who want to gain insight and tips on how to remain productive in agriculture, continue gardening and stay active outdoors can learn tips and techniques from the Ohio AgrAbility Program at Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences during a workshop designed to address the evolving needs of older farmers. The workshop, “I’m Not as Young as I Used To Be,” seeks to show how to remain safe and productive as an older farmer, said Kent McGuire, Ohio AgrAbility program coordinator for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. “The idea is to offer information that can benefit a growing, aging population,” he said. “The average age of...
  4. USDA: Record Corn, Soybean Forecast

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – With U.S. corn production forecast at a record 14 billion bushels, growers can expect to see futures prices stay above $4 per bushel for the time being, an expert from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences said. The U.S. Department of Agriculture said in its crop production report today (Nov. 8) that farmers will produce a record 14 billion bushels of corn per acre, an increase of 1 percent from the projected 13.843 billion bushels per acre USDA forecast in its September report. The results are an increase of 30 percent from 2012, USDA said, noting that “if realized, this will be a new record production for the United States.”   Yields are expected to average 160.4 bushels per acre, an increase of...
  5. Ohio State Agricultural Economist: An Aging U.S. Farmer Population Does Not Necessarily Warrant Concern

    COLUMBUS, Ohio --  U.S. farmers are aging, and the agricultural community often expresses concern about who will replace them. But that apprehension may be overblown, an economist with Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) said. Although some farm communities worry over a lack of new, younger farmers to replace the current population, these concerns are unwarranted, according to a recently conducted analysis by Carl Zulauf, an economist in the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics, which is a part of CFAES. Using USDA census data from 1945 to 2007, as well as data from the U.S. Department of Labor from 1980 to 2010, Zulauf compared the average age of U.S. farmers with the average age of the U.S. labor...
  6. Ohio State University Agronomists Offer Nutrient Management Plan Workshop for Certified Crop Advisors

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Certified Crop Advisors looking to become Certified Nutrient Management Plan Providers can earn certification through a workshop taught by agronomists from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.            The workshop offers participants information on creating a nutrient management plan that meets the requirements of the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) CAP 102 Nutrient Management and other conservation cost-share programs offered by the Natural Resources Conservation Service, said Greg LaBarge, an Ohio State University Extension field specialist and one of the leaders of Ohio State’s Agronomic Crops Team.  The team also includes...
  7. Corn Growers Increase Odds of Yield Loss the Longer Corn Sits in Fields

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – While some growers may choose to let corn dry in the field, the longer the corn sits, the greater potential it has for yield loss, according to a field crop expert with Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. In fact, delaying harvest beyond early to mid- November can result in yield losses from stalk lodging, ear drop and ear rot, said Peter Thomison, Ohio State University Extension agronomist. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. Letting corn dry in the field exposes the crop to unfavorable weather conditions as well as to wildlife damage, he said. Although delaying harvest has little to no effect on grain quality traits such as oil, protein, starch and kernel breakage, it may result in more...
  8. Testing for Prussic Acid

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – With the frost that hit the region in recent days, the potential for prussic acid poisoning in livestock is likely on the mind of many producers. But, in addition to taking measures to prevent livestock toxicity, producers can also consider testing forage for prussic acid content, according to a forage expert with Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Some forage species, such as sudangrass, sudangrass hybrids, forage sorghums or sorghum-sudangrass crosses, can become toxic to livestock after a frost, said Mark Sulc, an Ohio State University Extension specialist. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. While producers can take steps to prevent  or lower the risk of prussic acid poisoning in...
  9. Ohio State Aquaculture Research Program Looking to Recruit New or Beginning Fish Farmers

    PIKETON, Ohio – An innovative program offered by the Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences is looking to recruit, mentor and grow a new crop of fish farmers. The Ohio Center for Aquaculture Research and Development at the Ohio State University South Centers is offering 25 new and beginning fish farmers a hands-on approach to aquaculture and the business of fish farming through a year-long program that gives participants the opportunity to study the issue at the Piketon facility. The OSU South Centers are a part of the college. Called Aquaculture Boot Camp, the ultimate goal of the training is to “transform civilians into fish farmers,” said Estefania James, who works with the program at the OSU South Centers....
  10. OSU Extension Offers Livestock Mortality Composting Certification Courses Nov. 18, 20

    CANFIELD, Ohio – Livestock producers looking for an economical and environmentally beneficial way to deal with dead animals can earn livestock mortality composting certification through a course offered by experts from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Livestock mortality happens on all livestock and poultry farms at some point for a variety of reasons, including illness, old age, natural disasters and birthing problems, said Clif Little, an educator with the college’s outreach arm, Ohio State University Extension. In Ohio, there are four approved methods for disposing of livestock mortality: composting, incineration, burial and rendering. Composting is the most economical because it not only saves farmers money, it also...
  11. Ohio State University Agronomists Offer Updated Fertility Recommendation Calculator for Field Crop Growers

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Agronomists from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences have updated a fertility recommendation calculator designed to provide major field crop growers with guidance on fertilizer application rates and costs. The updated tool offers users calculations based on tri-state fertilizer recommendations for corn, soybeans, wheat only, wheat for grain and straw, corn silage, and alfalfa, said Greg LaBarge, an Ohio State University Extension field specialist and one of the leaders of Ohio State’s Agronomic Crops Team. The team also includes scientists from the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.  OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms, respectively, of the...
  12. Ohio State University Fact Sheet Offers Guidance on Soil Sampling

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Agronomists from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences have created a fact sheet designed to provide growers guidance on soil sampling to develop nutrient recommendations. The fact sheet helps outline the steps needed to better ensure a quality soil sample is achieved, which is key for growers to accurately manage fertility input costs and promote environmental stewardship, said Greg LaBarge, an Ohio State University Extension field specialist and one of the leaders of Ohio State’s Agronomic Crops Team. The team also includes scientists from the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.  OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms, respectively, of the college...
  13. Ohio State University Offers Agritourism Safety Tips for Consumers, Farmers

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – From apple picking at a pick-your-own operation to pumpkin patches complete with hayrides and corn mazes, consumer interest in agritourism is high this time of year. Farm operators need to make sure that they are prepared not only for the additional traffic, but that their operations are prepared for safety, according to safety experts from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Consumers also need to be aware of safety precautions they can take to ensure they enjoy their farm visits without injury, said Eric Barrett, an Ohio State University Extension educator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. Agritourism is a significant and growing industry for farmers and a huge draw for consumers, Barrett said...
  14. OSU Entomologists: Stink Bugs Could Injure Corn in Addition to Soybeans

    WOOSTER, Ohio – Field crop growers may already be aware that stink bugs could cause injury to soybeans, but it seems the smelly pests could also cause problems for both sweet and field corn, entomologists with Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences said.  Although the damage stink bugs can cause to soybeans in Ohio has the potential to be a significant problem, many growers may be less aware that the insects can also cause injury in corn, said Andy Michel, an Ohio State University Extension pest expert. While there have been a few reports in the Buckeye state of stink bug injury in some northern Ohio corn fields, growers who have found damage to corn that includes discolored, shrunken and or missing kernels, may find that stink...
  15. OSU Extension Offers Guidance for Reseeding Pasture in Pipeline Rights-of-Way

    CALDWELL, Ohio – Farmers who are negotiating easements across their property for shale oil and gas pipelines may want to consider including a clause about when the company should reseed their pastures, a forage expert with Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences said. Reseeding at the wrong time of year, which appears to be happening frequently, often results in failure, he said. Farmers need to be aware of the impact that the construction, maintenance and long-term presence these pipelines can have on their property, particularly when it comes to reseeding pipeline right-of-way pasture and hay areas, said Clif Little, an educator with the college’s outreach arm, Ohio State University Extension. Little and Mark Sulc, an OSU...
  16. Ohio State University to Offer Series of Tax Schools Statewide, November and December

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Experienced tax preparers wanting to learn about federal tax law changes and updates for this year as well as learn more about issues they may encounter when filing individual and small business 2013 tax returns can take advantage of a series of two-day income tax schools offered by Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The eight OSU Income Tax Schools will focus on interpreting tax regulations and recent changes in tax laws to help tax preparers, accountants, financial planners and attorneys advise their clients, said Larry Gearhardt, director of the Ohio State University Income Tax School Program of Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the statewide outreach arm of the college. “The...
  17. Ohio State Weed Specialists are Looking for Herbicide-Resistant Weeds

    Wanted – a few bad weeds. Researchers from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences are looking to collect samples of several weed varieties that are herbicide-resistant and could potentially pose problems for growers in the region, said Mark Loux, an Ohio State University Extension weed specialist.  OSU Extension is the statewide outreach arm of the college. Loux is collecting the samples as part of an effort to track herbicide-resistant weeds that are beginning to show up in Ohio fields that have caused problems for growers in other states. The goal is to try to prevent the weeds’ further spread in Ohio. At the top of the wanted list is Palmer amaranth, which is also known to many cotton and soybean farmers in the...
  18. Corn Growers Need to Look Out for Western Corn Rootworm Damage

    WOOSTER, Ohio – Corn growers who find unexpected lodging during harvest could find that the problem is caused by Bt-resistant western corn rootworm, an entomologist with Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences said.  While there have been no reports in Ohio of resistant rootworms, growers may want to keep a sharp eye out for any significant lodging as it could be a sign that the pests are indeed present, said Andy Michel, an Ohio State University Extension pest expert. The concern is that the western Corn Belt has been experiencing greater than expected damage on Bt-corn expressing the single trait Cry3Bb1, with most of these observations found in continuous corn, said Michel, who also has an appointment with the Ohio...
  19. Workshops to Promote the Use Cover Crops to Improve Soil Health, Water Quality and Yields

    CELINA, Ohio – Growers who want to improve soil health, reduce soil erosion and cut down on nutrient losses may want to consider using cover crops such as oilseed radish, cereal rye, or Austrian winter pea and crimson clover, according to a soil expert with Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Jim Hoorman, an Ohio State University Extension educator and an assistant professor studying cover crops and water quality issues, will hold a  workshop, “Using Cover Crops to Improve Soil Health,” on Nov. 14 and Dec.10, 2013 and on Jan. 14, 2014. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. The workshop will offer growers an advanced, marathon session on cover crops, with the opportunity to work hands-on with...
  20. Ohio State University to Offer Agriculture and Natural Resources Tax Webinar and Workshop Dec. 19

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences will host a day-long tax webinar and workshop Dec. 19 for those who want to learn more about federal tax law changes and updates they may encounter when filing 2013 tax returns for farmers. The six-hour program will focus on special issues specific to farm tax returns related to agriculture and natural resources and is open to tax preparers as well as individuals who file their own farm taxes, said Larry Gearhardt, director of the Ohio State University Income Tax School Program of Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the statewide outreach arm of the college. The cost for the one-day school is $125 and organizers have applied for continuing education credit...
  21. Ohio State University to Offer Year-end Tax Tips for Farmers at Nov. 4 Workshop

    GREENVILLE, Ohio – Farmers and producers looking to plan ahead for tax filing this year can learn about federal tax law changes and updates, as well as potential money-saving tips they can use when filing 2013 tax returns, from tax experts at Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. A Nov. 4 workshop offered by Larry Gearhardt, director of the Ohio State University Income Tax School Program of Ohio State University Extension, will focus on interpreting tax regulations and recent changes in tax laws and is designed to help farmers learn what questions to ask to make more informed decisions about their taxes, he said. OSU Extension is the statewide outreach arm of the college. The program will help farmers and producers...
  22. 2013 Farm Science Review Sees Increased Attendance, Concludes on a High Note

    LONDON, Ohio – With an attendance of 129,864 visitors to this year’s Farm Science Review Sept. 17-19 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, Ohio, organizers hailed the 51st annual trade show a success. The visitor total was an increase from last year’s Review, which reported an attendance of 114,324, said Chuck Gamble, who manages the Review. “Exhibitors were very pleased and farmers were out there smiling,” Gamble said. “It’s a great time to be in agriculture, especially knowing that the global population will reach 9 billion by the year 2050, increasing the demand for food.” After what seemed like it would be washout due to persistent rains in the area during the morning hours, last Thursday’s (9/19) afternoon...
  23. Ohio State University Promotes Injury Prevention, Safety for Senior Farmers During Farm Safety Week Sept. 15-21

    LONDON, Ohio – As growers prepare for the upcoming harvest season, safety experts from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences are offering safety tips for senior-aged farmers, particularly those who may have diminished sensory levels but are still very much actively working on the farm. The average age of a farmer in Ohio is 57, with more elderly farmers staying involved with the farm for financial reasons, because they want to remain active, or because it’s their lifestyle, said Kent McGuire, Ohio AgrAbility program coordinator for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. Ohio AgrAbility is part of a U.S. Department of Agriculture program that promotes independence for people in...
  24. Higher Moisture Levels in Grain Call for Additional Safety Measures

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – As corn silage harvest comes to a close and grain harvest nears, growers need to be aware of safety precautions to prevent grain engulfments, according to safety experts from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The issue is of particular concern this year as higher moisture levels in some crops could lead to more out-of-condition grain at storage time, which in turn can increase the chance for grain bin disruptions and potential engulfments, said Andrew “Dewey” Mann, safety research associate for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. “With cooler conditions over much of the growing season this summer in the region followed by a damp fall, the...
  25. Ohio State Economists to Hold Water Quality Discussion During 2013 Farm Science Review

    LONDON, Ohio – With increased understanding of the costs of agricultural runoff and its impact on water quality in Ohio, experts from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences will discuss how the college works with Ohio farmers to lessen the potential for runoff from farmlands. Agricultural economists from the college have conducted extensive analyses on water quality issues in Ohio and will present a panel discussion on the topic during this year’s Farm Science Review, Sept. 17-19 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, Ohio. The panel discussion, “Water Quality: State and National Concerns and Consequences,” will be moderated by Matthew Roberts, an associate professor of agricultural economics, Sept. 17...

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