Tracy Turner

Technical Editor
Focus Areas: 
Chow Line, consumer news, food safety, nutrition.
  1. Bacon

    Drought: No Bacon Shortage, But Consumers Can Likely Expect Higher Prices for Pork Next Year

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – No need to go hog wild. Despite a report from Britain’s National Pig Association last week predicting a worldwide shortage of bacon due to drought, the U.S. is not experiencing a pork shortage, an Ohio State University Extension specialist said. But consumers can expect to pay higher prices at the grocery counter next year thanks to a decrease in pork supplies as a result of the drought of 2012, which has been the worst in decades, said Steve Moeller, an OSU Extension swine specialist. The drought, which severely impacted growers and producers nationwide, particularly in Midwest states including Ohio, is resulting in a 13 percent drop in corn production, the lowest production since 2006, according to the U.S. Agriculture Department. As of Sept. 25, the...
  2. Corn stalks

    Drought: Corn Stalks Can Stretch Forage

    WOOSTER, Ohio –Ohio growers may find that after they’ve harvested their corn, there still may be some value left in the residue, an Ohio State University Extension educator said.  With forage supplies tight this year, the cornstalks and grain residue that remains in the field after harvest can provide feed for livestock, said Rory Lewandowski, an agricultural and natural resources educator for OSU Extension. Considering that an estimated 50 percent of the total corn plant yield remains in the field after harvest, those acres harvested for corn can represent a potential forage source that is often overlooked, he said. That is significant, since the drought of 2012 has been one of the worst on record in Ohio, leaving many livestock producers short on...
  3. water control structure

    Farm Science Review: Water Control Structure Benefits Farmers and Environment

    LONDON, Ohio – A new field drainage technology could help reduce runoff from farm fields and reduce the risk of harmful algae blooms in Lake Erie and other Ohio lakes.  The system, called an Inline Water Level Control Structure, is designed to keep water and nutrients such as nitrates and phosphorus on the land where they can be used by crops, Ohio State University’s Farm Science Review organizers said. Working with the Ohio Land Improvement Contractors Association (OLICA), two new water control structures were installed at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center during Farm Science Review last week. The new installations bring the total number of the systems in use there to eight, said Matt Sullivan, Farm Science Review assistant manager.   He said the Molly...
  4. Sorghum Sundangrass

    OSU Extension: Fall Frost Increases the Potential for Toxicity in Livestock

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – While fall frost is an annual concern for livestock producers because of the potential for prussic acid poisoning, the potential for toxicity in livestock is perhaps of wider concern this year because of the drought that many livestock producers suffered, according to an Ohio State University Extension specialist. The drought of 2012 has been one of the worst on record in Ohio, leaving many livestock producers short on hay and silage supplies. The lack of substantial rainfall, extreme heat and dryness left many producers looking for any alternative forages they can plant to make up for the shortages, said Mark Sulc, an OSU Extension forage specialist. “This year especially with the dry weather, people were looking for ways to grow supplemental forage,...
  5. Sorghum Sundangrass

    OSU Extension: Fall Frost Increases the Potential for Toxicity in Livestock

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – While fall frost is an annual concern for livestock producers because of the potential for prussic acid poisoning, the potential for toxicity in livestock is perhaps of wider concern this year because of the drought that many livestock producers suffered, according to an Ohio State University Extension specialist. The drought of 2012 has been one of the worst on record in Ohio, leaving many livestock producers short on hay and silage supplies. The lack of substantial rainfall, extreme heat and dryness left many producers looking for any alternative forages they can plant to make up for the shortages, said Mark Sulc, an OSU Extension forage specialist. “This year especially with the dry weather, people were looking for ways to grow supplemental forage,...

Pages