Tracy Turner

Technical Editor
Focus Areas: 
Chow Line, consumer news, food safety, nutrition.
  1. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Sprayers, Precision Ag Are Focus of Aug. 16 Southwest Ohio Corn Growers Field Day

    WASHINGTON COURT HOUSE, Ohio — Organizers will focus on technologies that can improve accuracy and efficiency while saving farmers money, increasing yields and protecting the environment during the Southwest Ohio Corn Growers Field Day on Aug. 16. A goal of the event is to help participants learn tips and techniques for improving farm productivity and profitability, said Ken Ford, an Ohio State University Extension educator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. “It’s an opportunity for farmers to come hear about new technologies and new research to help growers increase the profit margins on their farms,” he said. “Topics for the day were generated from issues...
  2. Carrot Weevil Larva. Photo:  CFAES

    Muck Crops Field Day is July 28

    WILLARD, Ohio — Researchers with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University will offer a July 28 field day focusing on the needs of fresh-market vegetable producers that will offer farmers the latest information on diseases facing muck crops. The Muck Crops Field Day is from 9 a.m. to noon at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center’s Muck Crops Agricultural Research Station, 4875 State Route 103 S in Willard. The station covers 15-plus acres of high-organic-matter muck soil in Huron County’s productive “salad bowl” region, said Bob Filbrun, the station’s manager. The workshop will also offer growers information on several research trials being conducted at the station, including a look at...
  3. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Western Agronomy Field Day is July 20

    SOUTH CHARLESTON, Ohio – Growers who want to get an idea of what they can expect from their crops this year and how agronomic experts view yield potentials this season can do so at the Western Agronomy Field Day July 20 at the Western Agricultural Research Station, located in South Charleston. The workshop will feature presentations by researchers and state specialists from Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms, respectively, of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The event is designed to inform and educate farmers about the agricultural research advances made in the past year at the Western Agricultural Research Station, one of...
  4. Harmful algal bloom -- Lake Erie. Photo: NASA, NOAA

    Experts: Smaller Algal Bloom Predicted For Western Lake Erie

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Harmful algal blooms are expected to be lower this year in Lake Erie than in 2015. The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and its research partners predict that western Lake Erie will experience a less severe bloom than the record-setting one experienced last year during the harmful algal bloom season, the agency said July 7. The outlook reflects less discharge from the Maumee River and a return to an average nutrient runoff into the lake, NOAA said. This year’s bloom is expected to first appear in late July and increase in August in the far western basin of Lake Erie. The location and effects will depend on prevailing winds. “The need to reduce phosphorus and other nutrients from fertilizer, manure and sewage remains,” said...
  5. Blueberries and red goji berries. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Super Berry Field Night to Provide Insight on Fruit Crops New to Ohio

    PIKETON, Ohio – Growers wanting to know more about production of a variety of berries not traditionally grown in Ohio can learn more about how this crop can add income to your farm during an upcoming workshop conducted by horticulture and viticulture experts with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. A Super Berry Field Night will be offered July 7 to help new and experienced growers learn more about Black Goji berries and other so-called “super fruits,” including blackberries, blueberries, elderberries, aronia and red goji berries, said Gary Gao, an Ohio State University Extension specialist and associate professor of small fruit crops at Ohio State University South Centers at Piketon. Super berries or super fruits...
  6. Marestail. Photo: CFAES.

    Weed Science Field Day is July 6

    COLUMBUS, Ohio –Weed resistance prevention and updates on new technologies to control weeds will be among the topics discussed during the July 6 Weed Field Day offered by scientists with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. Whether it’s Palmer amaranth, giant ragweed or marestail, the field day is designed to help growers learn more about how to prevent weeds from taking over farm fields, said Anthony Dobbels, an Ohio State University Extension program research specialist in weed science. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. “The advantage of offering a weed field day is that it offers growers the chance to see new products and advancements in weed control before they are widely available,” he...
  7. Aerial  view of corn field from an unmanned aerial vehicle. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Registration Now Open for July 12 Western Ohio Precision Ag Day

    COVINGTON, Ohio – Registration is now open for the July 12 Western Ohio Precision Agriculture Day hosted by Ohio State University Extension. Focusing on precision placement opportunities, the daylong workshop is a chance for growers to learn more about nutrients and water quality, said Amanda Bennett, an OSU Extension educator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. “We’ll focus on the newest innovations in precision agriculture and how farmers can use Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to access imagery to guide nutrient applications decisions,” she said. “We’ll also focus on the 4Rs of nutrient stewardship – using the right source, at the right rate, during right time and in the...
  8. Grazing livestock. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Be Safe: Animal Control Tips for Livestock Producers

    PIKETON, Ohio — Livestock producers need to take precautions and be prepared to implement safety procedures when having visitors or tours on their farm or when exhibiting animals, to prevent risk of injury to both humans and animals, says a beef cattle expert with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. That’s especially true when visitors to farms or other livestock exhibits don’t have a background in production agriculture and have little understanding of the process of food production, said John Grimes, beef coordinator for Ohio State University Extension and a member of the OSU Extension Beef Team. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. With the warmer weather come more opportunities for public...
  9. Grazing sheep with lamb. Photo: Thinkstock.

    July 9 Ohio Sheep Day Offers Insight Into Starting, Expanding Commercial Sheep Production

    SALEM, Ohio — With a strong market for lamb and sheep in Ohio, the opportunities for new producers to get into the sheep production business or for existing producers to expand their operations are growing, says a sheep expert with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. “The market for sheep and lamb meat across Ohio and the country is dictating that we need more commercial sheep and lamb producers to meet growing consumer demand,” said Roger A. High, executive director of the Ohio Sheep Improvement Association (OSIA) and Ohio State University Extension state sheep program specialist. “The market demand has created a profitable way for farmers to make more income on their farms for those who have some extra...
  10. Cressleaf groundsel. Photo: CFAES.

    Large Populations of Cressleaf Groundsel found in Wheat, Hay Fields in Ohio

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Cressleaf groundsel is on the rise in fields across Ohio thanks to a mild winter that’s allowed many weeds to get an aggressive start this growing season, said a weed scientist in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. And while cressleaf groundsel isn’t a new problem, the weed, which is typically found in no-till corn and soybean fields that have not yet been treated with burndown herbicides, is being reported in fairly high numbers in hay and wheat fields, said Mark Loux, an Ohio State University Extension weed specialist. OSU Extension is the statewide outreach arm of the college. Cressleaf groundsel is a winter annual that emerges in late summer or fall and infests late-summer seedings...
  11. Malting barley crops. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Vegetable Workshop Series Offers Insight into Alternative Crops, Soil Health

    FREMONT, Ohio — Growing hops and barley crops is an increasingly popular way to generate additional income from the farm. But before growers decide to devote some acreage to these new crops, they need to understand the costs and labor involved in growing them. Allen Gahler, an Ohio State University Extension educator in Sandusky County, said that while there is a strong and growing market for hops and barley in Ohio, growers should put pencil to paper before making the decision. Hops, for example, require a huge initial investment, Gahler said. “It would have to be the right fit for growers, considering that hops can be a $20,000 per acre investment just to get started,” he said. “Hops and barley crops are having a resurgence in Ohio because the growing craft...
  12. An example of black cutworm above ground injury on corn. Photo: CFAES

    Time to Scout for Black Cutworm in Ohio

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Now is the time to scout for black cutworm in Ohio, thanks to the migratory pests that moved into the state from the South in April and are now starting to cause damage to some corn crops in the region, says an entomologist with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. “We’ve seen some fields with cutting damage,” said Kelley Tilmon, a field crop entomologist with Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms of the college, respectively. But, Tilmon said, the damage levels seen at this point do not indicate that the pests have risen to a level to cause a crisis situation. Already, there have...
  13. Soybeans. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Late-Planted Soybeans Require Slight Management Changes

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Warmer temperatures and drying fields means more farmers are out taking advantage of the mild weather to catch up on planting after delays earlier during the season kept many out of their fields. But those growers who still aren’t able to get their soybean crops in before June may need to make slight adjustments to their management plans, says a field crops expert in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.   After weather fluctuations during the growing season this year that have included freezing temperatures and snow flurries to sunny, 80-degree days to excess rain and cooler conditions that have left fields too wet to plant, planting is down across much of the region, with many farmers needing to...
  14. Growers can learn more about precision planters during a Planter Field Day May 31. Photo: Nate Douridas

    May 31 Field Day Offers Look at Precision Planting

    LONDON, Ohio – Weather conditions have delayed some farmers from getting into their fields to plant this spring, so more growers are looking to new technologies to help them speed up the planting process. With each day growers aren’t able to get into their fields to plant due to cold or wet soil conditions, more questions are arising as to how the planting delays will impact yields, said Mary Griffith, an Ohio State University Extension educator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. “While growers always are focused on getting their crops in on time, this year many farmers are especially concerned about how a narrow planting season such as this will impact yields,”...
  15. Corn crops. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Planting Delays Don’t Automatically Mean Trade Out Full-Season Corn

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Cooler temperatures and wet fields across the region that have delayed planting for many growers have some farmers questioning whether they should swap out their full-season seeds with hybrid ones that will produce corn sooner. Not necessarily, says an agronomist in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. In most cases, full-season corn hybrids will mature or achieve a “black layer” before a killing frost even when planted as late as May 25, said Peter Thomison, an Ohio State University Extension agronomist. OSU Extension is the statewide outreach arm of the college. And depending on which region of Ohio or Indiana you are growing in, that maturity or black layer can be achieved with planting full-...
  16. Gray garden slug adult. Photo: CFAES

    Cooler Weather Conditions, Late Planting, Impacts Insects on Crops

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Rainy, cooler weather experienced recently throughout the region means slugs may be on the rise in some field crops, says an entomologist with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. The rains combined with colder temperatures are ideal slug weather, said Kelley Tilmon, a field crop entomologist with Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms of the college, respectively. Because slugs love these cooler, wetter conditions, Tilmon said growers need to be on the lookout in their corn and soybean fields for slug feeding damage, which can sometimes be heavy.  “During crop emergence, farmers should...
  17. Wheat stripe and wheat rust. Photo: CFAES.

    Mild Winter Could Increase Chance for Wheat Disease, Rusts in Particular

    WOOSTER, Ohio — Growers need to keep a vigilant eye on their wheat fields this year, thanks to a mild winter that has set the stage for the potential of early diseases in wheat crops, says a wheat expert from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. This year’s warm winter means that growers need to be on the lookout for several wheat diseases such as stripe rust, which could cause yield loss if untreated, said Pierce Paul, an Ohio State University Extension wheat researcher. Mild winters favor disease in many ways, said Paul, who is also a plant pathologist with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.  OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms, respectively, of the...
  18. Malting barley crops. Photo: Thinkstock.

    June 14 Field Day Looks at Multiple Uses of Small Grains

    WOOSTER, Ohio – One crop, multiple profit options? Farmers who grow small grains can find additional uses for them, including as cover crops and as alternative or supplemental livestock forages, besides using them as a cash grain crop, says an Ohio State University Extension educator. Small grains — including cereal rye, wheat, oats and barley — can be planted and put to use to fulfill a variety of needs, said Rory Lewandowski, an OSU Extension agriculture and natural resources educator. Crop growers who also produce livestock may find that growing small grains as cover crops can not only protect and improve their soils, but those cover crops can also feed their livestock or be sold for profit as a cash crop, Lewandowski said. “Not only can farmers reap the...
  19. Wheat field. Photo: Thinkstock.

    The Verdict is In: Field Day Offers Results of Ohio Wheat Trials

    CIRCLEVILLE, Ohio – Growers can learn the results of Ohio’s wheat trials during a Wheat Field Day on June 1 as well as take a tour of several of the trial test plots. The event will feature presentations by several small-grains experts from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University and will offer growers a perspective on multiple wheat-management techniques, including how to identify and manage wheat diseases, said Laura Lindsey, a soybean and small-grains specialist with Ohio State University Extension.  The event is from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at a farm owned by Jeff Minor at 19076 Florence Chapel Pike in Circleville.  Researchers with OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center have some...
  20. Soybeans. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Researcher Seeking Soybean Fields for Pollinator Study

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Although soybean crops are self-pollinating, some species of bee and fly pollinators can enhance soybean yields, says a researcher with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. The question is, what pollinator insects are active in Ohio soybean crops? That’s what Kelley Tilmon, a field crop entomologist with Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, wants to know. OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms of the college, respectively. Tilmon is conducting a study on the issue and is seeking conventional or organic soybean growers willing to allow insect sampling equipment to be placed in their fields to identify what pollinator insects are...
  21. Wheat field. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Field Day Offers Tips on Wheat Management

    CUSTAR, Ohio – Growers can learn more about wheat management techniques from experts from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University during Wheat Field Day June 21.   The event is from 9 to 11:30 a.m. at the Northwest Agricultural Research Station of the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), 4240 Range Line Road, in Custar. The event is free and open to the public.  The program will include a wagon tour of test plots, said Matt Davis, who manages the station. OARDC is the research arm of the college.   “It is my hope that wheat producers will be able to take away information from this workshop that they can successfully apply to their operations,” he said. “So far this year...
  22. Hops. Photo: Thinkstock

    Hops Tours Offered First Fridays in Spring, Early Summer

    PIKETON, Ohio – Learn about hops and how to grow the increasingly popular crop during the First Fridays Hops Tours at the Ohio State University South Centers in Piketon. The tours, which are offered on the first Friday of the months of May, June and July, will allow participants to learn more about the Ohio hops research being conducted by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. The tours are part of the Hop Production to Enhance Economic Opportunities for Farmers and Brewers project. They include a classroom session on hops led by researchers with Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, and a tour of the hop fields at the Piketon facility, said Charissa Gardner, program...
  23. Strawberries on plastic. Photo: CFAES

    Workshop: How to Grow Bigger, Better Strawberries and Get Them Earlier

    PIKETON, Ohio – Small-fruit researchers with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University will offer a workshop May 25 on a production method that results in larger, sweeter strawberries and can help growers extend the harvest season by weeks. Called plasticulture strawberry production, the method is an increasingly popular technique in which strawberries are planted in September and grown over the winter using plastic to keep the soil warm and suppress weed growth, according to Brad Bergefurd, a horticulturist with Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). The method results in larger, sweeter berries during an earlier harvest period, according to the results of an OSU Extension...
  24. Soybeans. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Weather Fluctuations Impact Soybeans Less Than Other Field Crops

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – From freezing temperatures and snow flurries to sunny, 80-degree days in a span of a week — if this type of strange weather continues, growers across Ohio want to know, will this have a negative impact on soybean crops? Not really, according to a field crops expert in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.   Laura Lindsey, a soybean and small grains specialist with Ohio State University Extension, says that soybean crop yields tend not to fluctuate much and are less likely to be negatively impacted by less than ideal weather compared to other grain crops such as corn. In fact, the state average soybean yield declined only 8 percent during the drought of 2012, Lindsey said, noting that Ohio’s...
  25. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Cow-calf Producers: Pay Attention to Livestock Nutrition Needs, Especially After Calving

    PIKETON, Ohio – As livestock producers move from winter feed to spring grazing, they should pay extra attention to spring-calving beef cows to make sure their nutritional needs are met, says a beef cattle expert with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. That could mean leading the animals away from early green grass this spring, said John Grimes, beef coordinator for Ohio State University Extension and a member of the OSU Extension Beef Team. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the college. If spring-calving beef cows’ nutritional needs are not adequately met from calving to breeding, it can cause a reduced body condition score, he said. And that can result in a disastrous rebreeding performance. Livestock generally...

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