News Releases

  1. A damaged building at the Molly Caren Ag Center.

    Molly Caren Agricultural Center overcomes tornado impact, Farm Science Review to proceed as planned

    Severe weather, now confirmed as six tornados by the National Weather Service, moved through central Ohio early in the morning of Feb. 28, 2024, causing significant damage at The Ohio State University’s Molly Caren Agricultural Center in Madison County. The center, in London, is the site of the annual Farm Science Review, hosted by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). No individuals or animals were in the impacted buildings at the time of the storm, and no one was injured. The university is continuing to assess the extent of the facility and equipment damage at Molly Caren and will determine contingency plans once the evaluation is complete. It has already been announced, however, that CFAES is fully committed to hosting Farm Science...
  2. Photo: Adobe Stock Images

    March 12-13 Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference focuses on farm issues including soil health, water quality, and how to increase net income

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Wondering how to build resilience with conservation agriculture? Want to learn about soil carbon marketing opportunities for farmers? What about how climate change affects soil carbon and soil health or whether phosphorus starter fertilizer is needed for corn? The answers to these questions and more will be discussed during the annual Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference (CTC), held March 12-13 at the McIntosh Center of Ohio Northern University (ONU), 525 S. Main St., in Ada. CTC is presented by The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and other supporters. The event focuses on providing information to farmers on promoting and maintaining soil health, said Randall Reeder, a retired Ohio State...
  3. The Farm Bill Summit panel

    CFAES Farm Bill Summit focuses on “unprecedented times”

    Seven state and national agricultural experts spoke at the first CFAES Farm Bill Summit, held on Friday, Feb. 23, at The Ohio State University. Hosted by Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), the speakers unraveled the complexities of Farm Bill legislation and discussed how the bill shapes the future of farming and related industries. Cathann A. Kress, vice president for agricultural administration and CFEAS dean, welcomed participants to the summit before Amy Ando, chair of the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics (AEDE), shared examples of policies, in addition to the Farm Bill, that have had major impacts on agriculture. She highlighted, as examples, the federal immigration policy, trade policy...
  4. March 1 webinar offers update on Ohio farmland leasing

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Farmers, producers, and landowners looking to update their farmland leases can learn the latest about the 2024 rental market outlook and the current economic outlook for Ohio row crops during a March 1 webinar offered from 10 a.m. to noon by farm management specialists from The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). “The webinar is designed for farm families, producers, and landowners to help them navigate the costs associated with running a farm operation that best fits their family and financial needs,” said Barry Ward, director of the Ohio State University Extension Income Tax School and leader of the Production Business Management program. “For example, during the farmland leasing webinar,...
  5. Coyote

    New Book from Top Coyote Researcher Reveals New Insights, Benefits

    Comedian Rodney Dangerfield often said, "I don't get no respect." The same catchphrase also perfectly applies to one of our most persistent wildlife predators—the coyote. The nation’s foremost expert on coyotes and a professor at The Ohio State University, Stanley D. Gerht, offers a new perspective in his just-published book, “Coyotes Among Us.” The book is based on more than 20 years of research by Gehrt, professor of wildlife ecology in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Co-authored with former journalist, Kerry Luft, the book draws from decades of experience to dispel coyote myths, highlight the benefits of living with coyotes, and embrace the coyote as a brilliant survivor...
  6. Farm field in Ohio

    Media Advisory: 2024 CFAES Farm Bill Summit set for Feb. 23

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Curious about the impact of the Farm Bill on the food and agricultural industry? Media are invited to the free 2024 Farm Bill Summit on Friday afternoon, Feb. 23, at The Ohio State University Fawcett Center, 2400 Olentangy River Road. Hosted by Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, (CFAES), the summit will feature CFAES and industry experts who will unravel the complexities of the legislation and how the bill shapes the future of farming and related industries. The program will be held from 1-3 p.m., with a networking reception immediately following from 3-5 p.m. The summit is an opportunity to engage in meaningful discussions, gain insights into the Farm Bill’s implications, and connect with...
  7. 2024 Distinguished Senior Award

    Ohio State CFAES names its top seniors

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — The most prestigious undergraduate award at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) will be presented to 23 seniors in April. The Distinguished Senior Award honors top graduating seniors on the Ohio State Columbus campus who exemplify the CFAES mission in areas such as academics and scholarship, research and innovation, service and involvement, and influence and leadership. “We hope these 23 award recipients feel a tremendous sense of accomplishment in their success as a student in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences,” said Ann D. Christy, CFAES professor and associate dean for academic programs. “It’s remarkable how they have succeeded in the classroom,...
  8. 4-H Spark EXPO helps young people build lifelong skills.

    Ohio 4-H Spark Expo Returns in June

    Students will have the opportunity to explore future careers at the 4-H Spark EXPO this summer on The Ohio State University campus. From June 12-15, teens at the Spark EXPO will learn about agriculture and related STEAM fields from industry experts, and faculty and staff of the Ohio State College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). “Not all students find their way to a four-year college, so we want to ensure all young people know 4-H is a space to prepare them for wherever their path may lead them after high school,” said Margo Overholt-Seckel, 4-H workforce development and pathways program manager. “Spark introduces them to a variety of educational and career opportunities they may not know about.”   As part of Spark EXPO,...
  9. Groundbreaking photo of the Multispecies Animal Learning Center

    Ohio State breaks ground on Multispecies Animal Learning Center

    At a ceremony on Jan. 30, 2024, The Ohio State University broke ground on the $52 million Multispecies Animal Learning Center (MALC), which will advance student learning and workforce development in animal agriculture.  The College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) will build the state-of-the-art facility at Waterman Agricultural and Natural Resources Laboratory on the Columbus campus. Ohio State President Walter “Ted” Carter Jr., who spoke at the groundbreaking on his 30th day on the job, said, “Agriculture is critically important, not only for states like Ohio, but for our nation and our world.” “This Multispecies Animal Learning Center is going to benefit our students by providing hands-on training that leads to...
  10. Ohio State scientist Katrina Cornish has a greenhouse full of the desert shrub guayule on the Wooster campus, where she hopes to one day build a full-scale latex processing plant.

    Innovative tech shows promise to boost rubber production in US

    Developments crucial as world’s natural supply is at risk COLUMBUS, Ohio – With disease and high demand posing threats to the world’s primary natural rubber supply in Southeast Asia, scientists are working to ramp up the U.S. rubber market by advancing methods to extract latex from two sustainable North American plant sources: a dandelion species and a desert shrub. Researchers reported their methods to improve efficiency and increase latex yield in two recent publications, building upon decades of research led by Katrina Cornish, professor of horticulture and crop science and food, agricultural and biological engineering at The Ohio State University.  Cornish and colleagues have added specialized agents during processing of the...

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