News Releases

  1. Dicamba can damage soybean plants that aren't resistant to it, causing cupped leaves. (Photo: OSU Extension)

    New Tips To Try To Prevent Weed Killer’s Spread

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — New restrictions a federal agency has put on using a controversial weed killer aren’t enough to prevent it from spreading onto nearby plants, according to an Ohio State University weed expert. As a result, Mark Loux, a weed specialist with Ohio State University Extension, and colleagues from Purdue University and the University of Illinois have created a list of additional precautions that farmers should try to follow whenever they use dicamba. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The additional recommendations from Loux and his colleagues include not applying dicamba if  the temperature is warmer than 80 degrees or if the forecast indicates wind gusts over 10...
  2. Tips and Events for the Week of Nov. 19

    Tip 1: Picking the Greenest Option for the Holidays: If you're like many people, Thanksgiving weekend is not only for turkey and the trimmings, but also for decorating your home for the holidays. Do you purchase a fresh cut tree and greenery or do you dig out last year’s reusable items from the attic? Have you thought about the impact these items have on our environment and our culture? Elizabeth Toman, visiting assistant professor in The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), can discuss a life cycle analysis of real and artificial holiday decorations that highlights local and global supply chains and their sustainability trade-offs. Contact her in the School of Environment and Natural Resources at 614-688-1057 or toman....
  3. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Holiday Indulgence in Moderation?

    Do you have any tips on how I can indulge in all the holiday food festivities without overdoing it? You aren’t the only one wondering about this issue. With the holidays approaching, many people are concerned about trying to stay healthy while also enjoying all the delicious foods and traditions associated with the many celebrations that are or will be soon occurring. Many people are looking for ways to either avoid temptation or make better choices that will allow them to maintain a healthy weight while they navigate all the indulgence of the season, said Jenny Lobb, a family and consumer sciences educator for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES)....
  4. American beech leaf disease is killing trees in northeast Ohio as well as in Pennsylvania, New York and Ontario. (Photo: CFAES)

    The Search for What’s Killing Beech Trees

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — American beech trees are dying in northeast Ohio and beyond. An Ohio State University study aims to figure out why. The study is looking into the cause of beech leaf disease, which was first found in Lake County in 2012 and has since spread to nine other counties in Ohio, eight in Pennsylvania, one in New York and five in Ontario. Young trees seem to be particularly susceptible to the disease, which initially causes dark stripes to appear on leaves, then deforms the leaves. Eventually the disease can kill the trees. “There’s no similar forest tree disease that we are aware of anywhere,” said Enrico Bonello, a professor of plant pathology in Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), who oversees...
  5. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Tips and Events for the Week of Nov. 12

    Tip 1: Smarter Commuting: Getting to work does not have to be an angst-producing slog behind a line of brake lights. Consider a cheaper, albeit colder, option: biking. “Let’s Make Biking Work,” a Nov. 15 breakfast program hosted by the Environmental Professionals Network at The Ohio State University, will discuss a regional strategy to assist the growing number of Columbus-area bike commuters and encourage more of them. Representatives from the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission will discuss a regional strategy to help link biking with other transit options to allow more people to get to and from work without having to drive. The program will be from 7:15 to 9:30 a.m. at the Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, 2201 Fred Taylor Drive, Ohio State, Columbus....
  6. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: A Year or Two is not Too Long to Use Uncooked Frozen Turkey

    I bought two turkeys last November, with the intent to cook one at Thanksgiving and the second one for New Year’s Day. We ended up going to a friend’s house on New Year’s instead, so now I still have the frozen turkey from last year in my freezer. Is it safe to cook it for our Thanksgiving meal this year? Great question! Yes, you can still safely cook that turkey as long as it has been stored in the freezer unopened and uninterrupted and stored at or below 0 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service. That’s because freezing keeps food safe by slowing the movement of molecules, causing microbes to enter a dormant stage, USDA says. Freezing preserves food for extended periods because it prevents...
  7. The price of fertilizer, energy, seed and other expenses are expected to go up in 2019 though income for Ohio farmers likely will not increase by much, if at all, a CFAES agricultural economist has projected. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Farmers’ Costs to Go Up

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — The cost of producing a grain crop is expected to rise next year, but farm income is unlikely to increase, an agricultural economist with The Ohio State University has projected. On average, profits for Ohio farmers next year will be “low to negative,” said Barry Ward, an assistant professor in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. For the past five years, farm income nationwide has been declining, with the exception of 2017 when it increased slightly. Next year, fertilizer, seed, machinery, labor and energy costs likely will be “modestly higher,” Ward said. “Nothing is really exploding, but we are going to see some increases,” said Ward, one of several faculty who spoke Nov. 2 at the...
  8. New Study Will Track Ways to Cut Runoff from Elevated Phosphorus Fields

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Some farm fields in northwest Ohio’s Maumee River watershed have more phosphorus than their crops can use. Called “elevated phosphorus fields,” such fields may be at higher risk of contributing to Lake Erie’s harmful algal blooms. That’s the premise of a new five-year, $5 million study that hopes to learn about those fields and lower that risk by creating new public-private partnerships. Led by Jay Martin, an ecological engineering professor with The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), the study plans to monitor and manage more than a dozen elevated phosphorus fields, all in the Maumee River watershed. Public-private partnerships To do the work, the study is...
  9. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Corn Prices Expected to Improve

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Farmers rattled by the dip in value of their soybean crop likely will see prices for their corn go up next year, one of the few optimistic projections made at a recent conference on future profits in farming. Most of the graphs presented at the Nov. 2 event hosted by the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics (AEDE) at The Ohio State University offered a grim outlook: a decline in soybean crop prices resembling a steep ski slope, shrinking pie slices representing Chinese demand for U.S. soybeans. But there were a few bright spots noted at the Agricultural Policy and Outlook Conference, including a projection that corn prices could improve in 2019. As the world supply of corn shrinks, that will drive up corn prices, said Ben...
  10. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Tips and Events for the Week of Nov. 5

    Tip 1: Harmful Algal Bloom Level Milder Than Predicted: Lake Erie's summer algal bloom level was less serious than scientists had predicted in July. The level was 3.6 out of a possible 10, indicating a relatively mild bloom, according to an Oct. 26 report issued by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). In a July report, scientists from NOAA and Ohio Sea Grant program at The Ohio State University had predicted the bloom level would be 6 on the severity index.  While this year’s level is slightly more severe than the 3.2 measured in 2016, it was much milder than the severe bloom of 2017 in which the level measured 8. Chris Winslow, director of Ohio Sea Grant and Stone Laboratory in Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental...

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