News Releases

  1. Manure Science Review to feature innovative MVP Dairy

    CELINA, Ohio—Manure Science Review this year will feature a cutting-edge livestock farm that’s keeping soil and water healthy by practicing regenerative agriculture.  The event takes place Aug. 10 at MVP Dairy in Celina.  Started in 2019, MVP Dairy is home to 4,400 cows, uses a variety of state-of-the-art technology, and was named 2020 Innovative Dairy Farmer of the Year by the International Dairy Foods Association and Dairy Herd Management magazine. The farm, its website says, “was specifically designed to effectively and efficiently handle manure from our cows while reducing odors and preventing potential runoff.”  Responsible manure management, the website says, “is always a top priority.” During Manure Science...
  2. 2021 Farm Science Review to be live and in person

    LONDON, Ohio—The Ohio State University’s Farm Science Review, which was held online last year because of the pandemic, will return this year to be live and in person for the 59th annual event. The premier agricultural education and industry exposition is set for Sept. 21–23 at Ohio State’s Molly Caren Agricultural Center, 135 State Route 38, near London. “While research, teaching, and serving communities throughout Ohio never stopped during the pandemic, we are grateful to once again be in person, working together, to advance our industry,” said Cathann A. Kress, Ohio State’s vice president for agricultural administration and dean of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). CFAES is the...
  3. Chow Line: Deep yellow field spot on watermelon key to choosing sweet, ripe melon

    What’s the best way to choose the perfect melon? Whether it’s watermelon, cantaloupe, honeydew, or other melons, summer days (or any day!) are a wonderful time to indulge in these delicious, nutritious fruits. Not only do these fruits taste wonderful, but they are also healthy, low-calorie treats that are packed with vitamins. For example, a cup of cantaloupe has 60 calories and is rich in vitamins A and C, while a cup of honeydew has 64 calories and is rich in vitamin C and potassium and provides B vitamins. A cup of watermelon has about 45 calories and has significant amounts of vitamins A and C. Watermelon is also 93% water, and the red variety is a good source of lycopene, a phytonutrient that gives watermelon its color. Lycopene appears to protect the body...
  4. Cathann A. Kress, dean of CFAES and vice president of agricultural administration at Ohio State. (Photo by Ken Chamberlain)

    CFAES dean appointed to Council for Agricultural Science and Technology board of trustees

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Cathann A. Kress, vice president of agricultural administration and dean of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), has been appointed to the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST) board of trustees. Kress will begin her three-year renewable term on the CAST board on Aug. 1. “I look forward to serving in this role and advancing the understanding of the science and technology that are critical to our modern food and agricultural industries,” said Kress. Established in 1972 as a result of a 1970 meeting sponsored by the National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council, CAST is based in Iowa and is an international consortium of scientific and professional societies,...
  5. (Photo: Brooke Beam, CFAES)

    Back this year for an in-person show: Farm Science Review 2021

    LONDON, Ohio—Ever want to climb into the cockpit of a plane and glide over a field?  At this year’s Farm Science Review Sept. 21–23, visitors will have that chance without leaving the grassy ground under them.  The upcoming, annual farm trade show will offer a series of virtual reality experiences such as operating a crop duster, high-tech planters, combines, and other equipment. Sitting in a mini IMAX-type theater, visitors to FSR can watch videos projected on a domed screen around them. They’ll get an expansive view—a bit wider than peripheral vision—so they can feel as if they’re flying a plane. Or riding a high-tech planter. Or peering into a beehive.   To film the videos, Ohio State University Extension educators...
  6. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Healthy red food options for Juneteenth

    We’re having a cookout as part of our Juneteenth celebration. Do you have any ideas about what foods to serve? First, it’s important to understand what Juneteenth is. Juneteenth is a holiday that began in Texas, signifying the date of June 19, 1865, when Union Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger told the slaves in Galveston, Texas, that the Civil War was over and that slavery had been abolished—two years after President Abraham Lincoln had signed the Emancipation Proclamation, which freed the slaves. The freed slaves began celebrating when they realized they were free, and thus the celebration became an annual tradition. As a result, the celebration of June 19 was coined “Juneteenth” and later became an official holiday in Texas in 1980. Yesterday, Juneteenth...
  7. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Troubling tick season expected

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Cicadas may be getting a lot of hype these days for their cameo appearance, but one of the state’s year-round regulars can cause a whole lot more problems.   Less exotic looking than cicadas and far smaller, ticks are easy to miss—that is, until they bite. With steadily increasing reports of illnesses from ticks biting people and pets in Ohio, ticks are concerning especially in the late spring and summer. During the warmest months, these tiny creatures are most active and most likely to pass on diseases. A warmer winter triggered an earlier start this spring, so ticks will be active for more of this year, said Risa Pesapane, a tick researcher and assistant professor with the colleges of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES)...
  8. Lone Star tick. Photo: Getty Images.

    Chow Line: Tick season could result in red meat allergies for some

    Can some ticks cause you to be allergic to meat? In some cases, yes. Spring marks the beginning of tick season and this year, the tick population is expected to surge.  With it comes the potential for tick bites, which could result in several complications, including Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and in some cases, cause some people to develop an allergy to red meat after being bitten. As mentioned in a previous Chow Line, lone star ticks in certain cases, can cause an allergy to red meat after being bitten by the tick.  This species of tick entered Ohio over the last decade or so. It has since spread throughout the state, although it is more common in southern Ohio, said Tim McDermott, an educator with Ohio State University Extension, the...
  9. Fried Cicadas on as skewer. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Cicadas can be a tasty treat, but they can be hazardous to those allergic to seafood, FDA warns

    I’ve heard that cicadas can be eaten. Is that true? Yes, it is true. Cicadas are among those insects that are safe to eat. And if you are among those who want to give them a try, this is the summer to do it. The periodical cicada known as Brood X will arrive in the millions in the Midwest over the next few weeks as the temperatures warm. Brood X is one of 12 periodical cicadas that emerge every 17 years, from mid-May to late June. Another three broods emerge every 13 years, primarily in southern states. Brood X includes three species–Magicicada septendecim, Magicicada cassini, and Magicicada septendecula–each of which will come up at different times during the spring, says David Shetlar, a professor emeritus of entomology with...
  10. Photo: Getty Images

    Ohio State expert: Lessons learned from COVID-19 pandemic likely to stem potential meat supply shortage

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Consumer alert: There’s no need to panic and no need to stock up on meat as of now. Despite this week’s cyberattack on JBS USA—one of the largest meat producers nationwide—beef and pork supplies could possibly avoid being in short supply at grocery stores, and consumers should not panic just yet, says Lyda Garcia, an assistant professor of meat science and an Ohio State University Extension meat specialist. OSU Extension is the statewide research arm of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  JBS is one of four large-scale meat producers, accounting for an estimated 20% of beef production in the United States. The Brazilian-based company suffered a cyberattack last weekend, prompting it...

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