News Releases

  1. A.I. software

    University/industry partnership takes field scouting to the next level

    LONDON, Ohio—It’s no secret that farming has become increasingly high-tech, but a partnership between The Ohio State University and an Ohio agribusiness is taking things even further with new field scouting technology that involves a drone and artificial intelligence (AI). The Molly Caren Agricultural Center, home to the annual Farm Science Review (FSR), is no stranger to implementing new technology and best practices to optimize production and, more importantly, serving as a resource for Ohio and regional producers.  Due to COVID-19 restrictions, FSR 2020 will be a three-day virtual show held Sept. 22–24 at fsr.osu.edu. Although the center is closed to the public, Molly Caren Ag Center farm manager Nate Douridas and his team have been conducting various...
  2. Chow line: Juice or whole fruit?

    Does eating a piece of fruit or squeezing it into a juice to drink offer the same health benefits? No. Even if you take an orange and squeeze fresh orange juice, drinking the juice of the orange doesn’t offer the same health benefits of eating the orange. Fruit juice lacks fiber, an important nutrient found in whole fruit, writes Dan Remley, an educator in family and consumer sciences for Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). “Fiber helps the digestive system, lowers cholesterol, promotes a healthy colon, and lowers blood sugar spikes, just to name a few benefits,” Remley writes in The Juice on Juice, a blog post at the Live Healthy...
  3. CFAES Students

    Learn how to become a Buckeye and CFAES student during Farm Science Review Online

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—If you’re hoping to be a future Buckeye on The Ohio State University’s Columbus or Wooster campus, you’ll want to catch the virtual sessions offered Sept. 22–24 as part of Farm Science Review. For the first time in its almost 60-year history, FSR will not be held in person due to the COVID-19 pandemic. By visiting this page, prospective students can learn virtually what it takes to be admitted to Ohio State and how to make the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) their academic home. An admissions overview for the Columbus campus will be offered on Tuesday, Sept. 22, from 9:30 to 10:15 a.m., followed by a student panel addressing “The dollars and cents of paying for college” from 10:30 to 11:15...
  4. A tablet showing FSR content held by someone in a flower patch.

    Your guide to virtual Farm Science Review

    Find a comfortable seat and charge your device. Farm Science Review is being held online this year because of COVID-19 concerns. Although the Molly Caren Agricultural Center is closed to the public, you’ll be able to learn the latest agricultural technology and helpful farming techniques from more than 400 exhibitors—all for free on your laptop, tablet, or smartphone. More than 200 free livestreamed and recorded talks and demos will be available online. You will have to provide your own steakburgers, milkshakes, or other FSR fare, though. To access the content for this year’s show, Sept. 22–24, start at fsr.osu.edu. Some videos and other content will be available before the show begins. From inside a large scarlet banner at the top of the FSR homepage...
  5. Fall produce. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Fall a great time for apples, peaches, blueberries, in addition to pumpkins

    I know that autumn means pumpkins will be available in abundance, but what other produce is in season in the fall? You are correct: This is the time of year when you will start to see pumpkins, squash, and gourds—which are all part of the Cucurbitaceae family—for sale in grocery aisles, farmers markets, and farms. But fall is also a good time to buy grapes, apples, watermelons, potatoes, berries, zucchini, yellow squash, and peaches, among many other seasonal fruits and vegetables. In fact, those are some of the commodities that many grocery stores are now starting to promote heavily at discounted prices in their grocery aisles, according to the Sept. 4 edition of the National Retail Report, a weekly roundup of advertised retail pricing information compiled by...
  6. Farm Science Review will hold live online sessions September 22-24. Photo: Getty Images.

    Supply chain, U.S. trade policy, COVID-19 to be discussed during Farm Science Review

    LONDON, Ohio—The U.S. trade policy, labor and immigration issues, agricultural commodity markets, and the food supply chain will be among the topics addressed at a panel discussion during the 59th annual Farm Science Review Sept. 22–24 at fsr.osu.edu.  The previously titled Tobin Talk, now The Talk on Friday Avenue, “Value Chains in Food and Agriculture,” on Sept. 22 at 10 a.m. at fsr.osu.edu, will feature comments from a panel of agricultural economists from The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  The Talk on Friday Avenue is among a series of presentations at Farm Science Review to address topics relevant to the agricultural industry, from controlling weeds and managing beef cattle to...
  7. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Selling meat from your farm

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—More and more Ohio livestock producers are selling their meat directly to consumers through farmers markets or online. That’s because consumers are increasingly valuing locally produced food and having a relationship with the farmer who raised it.  And the profit margin for farmers can certainly be higher than selling livestock to a company that processes and packages it for grocery stores.  But direct marketing of any product comes with challenges.  “Figuring out what consumers want is important,” said Garth Ruff, beef cattle field specialist with Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  Bacon or bratwurst?...
  8. Nymphal and adult forms of the lone star tick. Clockwise, from bottom left: unfed nymph, engorged nymph, adult male, unfed adult female, and engorged adult female. For size reference, the center dot is approximately 0.8 mm diameter. Photo by Jeffery Alfred, used with permission from Iowa State University Extension.

    Chow Line: Tick that causes meat allergies found in Ohio

    Is there a tick that causes people to develop an allergy to red meat, and can it be found it Ohio? Yes, to both of your questions. The tick you are referring to is called the lone star tick, which, in certain cases, in some people, can cause an allergy to red meat after being bitten by the tick.  This species of tick entered Ohio over the last decade or so. It has since spread throughout the state, although it is more common in southern Ohio, said Tim McDermott, an educator with Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  While the lone star tick prefers a wooded habitat, in many cases, it can also be found along the perimeter of pasture and hay fields that extend...
  9. Photo: CFAES

    Ohio 4-H blog brings STEM education to you virtually

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Interested in experiencing the COSI sensory playground virtually through the 360-degree lens of a 9-year-old? Want to learn how to conduct a field trip around the world through the use of virtual reality? Have you ever wondered how to make your own lava lamp?  A new website offered by the Ohio 4-H STEM program can show you all that and more.  The Ohio 4-H STEM blog provides youths, teachers, youth development professionals, volunteers, and parents with hands-on science, technology, engineering, and math ideas that are applicable to students of all ages.  The blog, which is organized by subject areas and categorized by grades K–12, offers engaging STEM programming that promotes and excites exploration and learning, said Mark...
  10. (Photo: Getty Images)

    The good and bad about Ohio’s jobless rate

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—The news is mixed about the rate of Ohioans out of work.   The state’s unemployment rate has rebounded from late spring’s rates, and it’s below the national rate. But, in July, Ohio’s jobless rate of 8.9% topped that of many nearby states. Across the Midwest, only one state had a higher rate than Ohio’s: Illinois.  Keep that in perspective, said Mark Partridge, an economics professor with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  During a recession, Ohio typically takes a bigger hit, he said. Jobs in manufacturing make up the largest portion of Ohio’s economy, and typically manufacturing sharply declines during a national recession. So...

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