News Releases

  1. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Troubling tick season expected

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Cicadas may be getting a lot of hype these days for their cameo appearance, but one of the state’s year-round regulars can cause a whole lot more problems.   Less exotic looking than cicadas and far smaller, ticks are easy to miss—that is, until they bite. With steadily increasing reports of illnesses from ticks biting people and pets in Ohio, ticks are concerning especially in the late spring and summer. During the warmest months, these tiny creatures are most active and most likely to pass on diseases. A warmer winter triggered an earlier start this spring, so ticks will be active for more of this year, said Risa Pesapane, a tick researcher and assistant professor with the colleges of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES)...
  2. Lone Star tick. Photo: Getty Images.

    Chow Line: Tick season could result in red meat allergies for some

    Can some ticks cause you to be allergic to meat? In some cases, yes. Spring marks the beginning of tick season and this year, the tick population is expected to surge.  With it comes the potential for tick bites, which could result in several complications, including Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and in some cases, cause some people to develop an allergy to red meat after being bitten. As mentioned in a previous Chow Line, lone star ticks in certain cases, can cause an allergy to red meat after being bitten by the tick.  This species of tick entered Ohio over the last decade or so. It has since spread throughout the state, although it is more common in southern Ohio, said Tim McDermott, an educator with Ohio State University Extension, the...
  3. Fried Cicadas on as skewer. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Cicadas can be a tasty treat, but they can be hazardous to those allergic to seafood, FDA warns

    I’ve heard that cicadas can be eaten. Is that true? Yes, it is true. Cicadas are among those insects that are safe to eat. And if you are among those who want to give them a try, this is the summer to do it. The periodical cicada known as Brood X will arrive in the millions in the Midwest over the next few weeks as the temperatures warm. Brood X is one of 12 periodical cicadas that emerge every 17 years, from mid-May to late June. Another three broods emerge every 13 years, primarily in southern states. Brood X includes three species–Magicicada septendecim, Magicicada cassini, and Magicicada septendecula–each of which will come up at different times during the spring, says David Shetlar, a professor emeritus of entomology with...
  4. Photo: Getty Images

    Ohio State expert: Lessons learned from COVID-19 pandemic likely to stem potential meat supply shortage

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Consumer alert: There’s no need to panic and no need to stock up on meat as of now. Despite this week’s cyberattack on JBS USA—one of the largest meat producers nationwide—beef and pork supplies could possibly avoid being in short supply at grocery stores, and consumers should not panic just yet, says Lyda Garcia, an assistant professor of meat science and an Ohio State University Extension meat specialist. OSU Extension is the statewide research arm of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  JBS is one of four large-scale meat producers, accounting for an estimated 20% of beef production in the United States. The Brazilian-based company suffered a cyberattack last weekend, prompting it...
  5. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Not sure what to do with fresh, harvested radishes? Pickle them

    I’ve got a fresh harvest of spring radishes in my garden, but other than adding them to my salad, I’m not sure what to do with them. Got any ideas? First, congratulations on your harvest! Radishes are an easy-to-grow vegetable because they can be planted directly from seed in the early spring and are typically among the first plants ready to harvest. Additionally, radishes are low in calories and are a source of potassium; calcium; sodium; and vitamins A, B, C, and K. Radishes are a cruciferous vegetable in the same plant family as kale, turnips, and broccoli. They can also help lower blood pressure and can be associated with a lower risk of heart disease, research shows.  Radishes have a peppery flavor and a crisp, crunchy texture. Several varieties exist,...
  6. Karcher named new chair of CFAES Department of Horticulture and Crop Science

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Douglas Karcher, PhD, an alumnus of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), is returning to the college as professor and chair in the Department of Horticulture and Crop Science. His four-year term begins Aug. 1, 2021, pending approval by the university’s Board of Trustees. Karcher currently works at the University of Arkansas, where he is interim assistant director of the Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station and is turfgrass specialist, professor, and assistant head in the Department of Horticulture. He started his career as an assistant professor in that department in 2000, was promoted to associate professor in 2005, and became professor in 2016. “We are excited in bringing an engaged...
  7. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Spring a good time for asparagus, strawberries and other fresh produce

    Which fruits and vegetables are in season now? As mentioned in a previous Chow Line, rain and bright sunny days make spring a good time to indulge in a wide range of plentiful produce such as asparagus, cabbage, kale, spinach, and strawberries. Not only are these items extremely fresh and flavorful because they’re currently in season, but they’re also widely discounted because of the abundance of supply based on this time of year. Because fruits and vegetables grow in cycles and ripen during certain seasons, produce typically is fresher and tastes best when ripe. And while most fruits and vegetables are available to consumers year-round thanks to agricultural innovations, seasonal fruits and vegetables are typically cheaper to buy because they are easier to produce...
  8. (Anastasia Vlasova did the genetic analysis of a newly discovered coronavirus. Photo: Ken Chamberlain, CFAES)

    New human coronavirus identified

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Researchers have identified and completed the genetic analysis of a newly discovered coronavirus – one that has evolved from a coronavirus that afflicts dogs to one that infects people and may contribute to respiratory illness. The discovery of the first dog coronavirus found to have crossed over to infecting people underscores the treacherous nature of coronaviruses and the need to monitor animal viruses as a way of predicting possible threats to public health, researchers say.  “At this point, we don’t see any reasons to expect another pandemic from this virus, but I can’t say that’s never going to be a concern in the future,” said Anastasia Vlasova, an assistant professor in The Ohio State University College of Food...
  9. Algal blooms on Lake Erie. (Photo: CFAES)

    Testing a new way to kill harmful algal blooms

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—As the weather warms and draws people to the water, tests are about to begin on a new technique for killing off harmful algal blooms in Ohio’s streams and lakes.  The technology being tested creates ozone and injects it into a waterway in the form of microscopic bubbles. Once in the water, the ozone can kill unwanted algae, destroy toxins, and boost oxygen levels, said Heather Raymond, director of the Water Quality Initiative at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  When these tiny bubbles of ozone called “nanobubbles” burst in the water, they produce hydroxyl radicals and peroxides. Those substances can further destroy harmful algae and possibly help cut off the algae’s...
  10. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Spinach, the tasty and healthy food

    My kids refuse to eat spinach. How can I prepare it in a way that might appeal to a finicky eater? First, it’s important to note that spinach is a healthy, dark, leafy, green vegetable that is full of protein, calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, folate, fiber, phosphorus, thiamine, and vitamins A, C, and K.  Also considered a superfood, spinach, as part of a healthy, balanced diet, is important for skin, hair, and bone health. Additionally, spinach can help improve blood glucose control in people with diabetes, and it lowers the risk of cancer, improves bone health, and can promote digestive regularity. There are three types of spinach, including savoy spinach, flat spinach, and semi-savoy spinach, all of which can be eaten cooked or raw. And it’s fairly easy...

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