News Releases

  1. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Is it food poisoning?

    I had stomach cramps not long after eating food I typically don’t eat. How do I know if I had food poisoning or if it was something else? The symptoms of food poisoning vary depending on the type of germ to which you’ve been exposed, but there are some common signs that can indicate whether you’ve been exposed to a foodborne illness. The most common signs include stomach cramps, upset stomach, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and fever. Some bacteria, such as Listeria can cause flu-like symptoms. It’s important to note that symptoms of food poisoning can range from mild to serious and that some of them can come on as quickly as 30 minutes after you eat or as long as four weeks after you’ve eaten something that contains a foodborne pathogen, according the...
  2. GWI aims to address the Navajo Nation’s most serious water needs. Photo: Ohio State.

    Global Water Institute leads effort to improve water and food security with the Navajo Nation

    COLUMBUS, Ohio–A new effort led by researchers at The Ohio State University will help the Navajo Nation mitigate the lack of water and food security at a time when the Navajo communities are facing new challenges due to COVID-19. The Global Water Institute (GWI) is partnering with the Navajo Nation and a consortium of partners including Assist International, Netafim, Suez WTS USA, Inc., WorldServe International and the Duke University Nicholas School of the Environment to confront the critical water crisis and improve agriculture and public health outcomes of the Navajo Nation. This federally recognized tribe with reservation lands in the states of New Mexico, Arizona and Utah is one of the largest in the country, with over 330,000...
  3. Photo: Getty Images

    Treasurer Sprague, Ohio State partner to advance “real money. Real world.” curriculum

    COLUMBUS, Ohio–Ohio Treasurer Robert Sprague today announced a partnership with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) to advance and expand the use of the college’s Real Money. Real World. financial literacy program statewide. The announcement coincides with the annual America Saves Week, which aims to raise awareness about financial literacy education while helping individuals to achieve financial stability.  “Securing a sound and prosperous financial future for our state starts with our young people, and that means preparing them for the challenges that come later in life,” said Treasurer Sprague. “I’ve seen the benefits of the Real Money. Real World. curriculum first-hand,...
  4. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Nonperishable foods to stock up on in advance of a snowstorm

    Due to this week’s snowstorm, I wasn’t able to get to the grocery store for a couple of days and we really weren’t prepared at all. What are some foods I should have on hand if I think I’ll be snowbound again for a few days? Generally speaking, bread and milk are typically the first items that many people stock up on when a winter weather emergency is forecast. While there are several theories as to why many people hoard bread and milk in anticipation of winter storms, the meteorologists at AccuWeather.com attribute the trend to the record-breaking Blizzard of 1978, when New Englanders were trapped in their homes for several weeks and the items that were most purchased prior to the storm were, you guessed it, bread and milk. However, if you...
  5. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Conference to discuss progress on NW Ohio water quality efforts

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—In 20 counties across northwest Ohio, a team of water quality specialists is working with farmers to evaluate practices that promote soil health and reduce the amount of phosphorus and nitrogen entering waterways. Part of the team’s work involves running field trials to determine the effects of applying varied rates of phosphorus, nitrogen, and potassium fertilizers to cropland. Extensive soil testing has been done on fields to see the how planting cover crops and minimally tilling the land affects soil health. And new water quality monitoring stations have been set up to show trends in nutrient runoff rates. Farmers in northwest Ohio have been cooperative, said Heather Raymond, director of the Water Quality Initiative launched by The Ohio State University...
  6. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Yes, dark chocolate can be a healthy choice for Valentine’s Day

    Can I celebrate Valentine’s Day with chocolate in a healthy way?  If you want to celebrate Valentine’s Day with sweet treats while keeping your health in mind, consider having some chocolate. However, make sure you choose a dark chocolate, with which you can both enjoy and gain some heart-healthy advantages. In moderation, dark chocolate is believed to provide multiple health benefits. This is because of its high levels of flavonoids, which are antioxidants that protect cells from damage caused by free radicals. Free radicals are unstable molecules that can alter and weaken cells, according to the Cleveland Clinic. Research has found that flavanols, which are the main type of flavonoid found in cocoa and chocolate, have potential influences on vascular...
  7. CFAES Distinguished Senior Award

    Ohio State CFAES names its top 25 seniors

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Twenty-five seniors have received the most prestigious undergraduate award at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The Distinguished Senior Award honors top graduating seniors on the Ohio State Columbus campus who exemplify the CFAES mission in areas such as academics and scholarship, research and innovation, service and involvement, and influence and leadership. “The 2021 recipients are our future innovators and leaders who have already made an impact within the academic environment at this university and beyond,” said Steven Neal, CFAES professor and associate dean for academic programs. Listed below are the Distinguished Seniors, including their academic units, majors, and hometowns....
  8. Photo: The Ohio State University

    Dispelling the myths: Face masks work to prevent COVID-19

    COLUMBUS, Ohio–Since the COVID-19 outbreak began, misconceptions about the effectiveness of face masks have circulated. Today, uncertainties about face coverings still exist, but Sanja Ilic, associate professor and food safety state specialist with Ohio State University Extension, is translating her research and educating the community about how masks can prevent the virus spread. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Through a series of simple home experiments, anyone, including students in grades K-12, can test if their mask stops COVID-19. “These tests,” Ilic said, “demonstrate the droplet transmission and serve as an educational tool of how the viruses are...
  9. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: New dietary guidelines offer some changed recommendations

    I just saw that the new federal dietary guidelines were released. Were there any changes made from the dietary guidelines that were released in previous years? Yes, there were several changes in the new 2020–2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The guidelines are published jointly every five years by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The latest version, released Dec. 29, 2020, provides science-based advice on what to eat and drink to promote health, help reduce the risk of chronic disease, and meet nutrient needs. According to those two agencies, the focus of this year’s guidelines is to “make every bite count” by encouraging consumers to focus on choosing healthy foods and beverages that are...
  10. Different flavors of hard candy – uniform in color – will be used to detect any changes in research participants’ senses of smell and taste. Photo: Shutterstock.com

    Using candy to sniff out probable cases of COVID-19

    COLUMBUS, OHIO–Scientists have proposed that using a cheap and simple product – hard candy – to screen for the loss of taste and smell in populations at risk for COVID-19 exposure may help detect probable positive cases in otherwise asymptomatic people. The Ohio State University research team received $305,000 in National Institutes of Health funding in a competitive bid to develop easy-to-deploy strategies that can identify people who are potentially infected with SARS-CoV-2. While symptoms like fever, chills, a cough and body aches vary widely among COVID-19 patients, an estimated 86% of people who test positive report a loss of smell, “which makes it a much better predictor, especially if it’s sudden loss,” said project co-leader ...

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