News Releases

  1. Three green plants showing upward growth

    Share ideas for growing the bioeconomy despite uncertain times

    WOOSTER, Ohio—With the COVID-19 pandemic raging on, the U.S. bioeconomy is facing challenges. On Friday, Feb. 12, from 9 a.m. to noon, The Ohio State University’s Advanced BioSystems Workshop will look at those challenges and will brainstorm ways for research, technology, and the government to address them. Workshop organizer Ajay Shah, agricultural engineer with Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), said plant-based fuels and products “have the potential to decrease U.S. dependence on petroleum feedstocks, improving energy security, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and creating new industries.” Good for industry, climate, the nation But he said the COVID-19 pandemic and...
  2. Red ripe tomatoes

    Workshop set for greenhouse growers: Listen to your plants, improve production

    WOOSTER, Ohio—Drones. Automation. Artificial intelligence. They’re some of the new, cutting-edge ways to monitor greenhouse plants. They’re also some of the subjects to be covered by an upcoming workshop for greenhouse growers. With a theme of “Improving Production Via Listening to Plants,” The Ohio State University’s 2021 Greenhouse Management Workshop takes place online from Jan. 27–29. “Growing ornamental and food crops in a controlled environment requires careful monitoring of plants’ physical and physiological aspects,” said workshop co-organizer Chieri Kubota, professor of controlled environment agriculture with Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (...
  3. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Polar vortex could be on the way

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—If you were thinking this winter has been fairly mild so far, it has been, but gear up.  Frigid temperatures could be gripping Ohio, the Midwest, and the Northeast around the last week of January.  The polar vortex, a wide area of swirling cold air near the North Pole, has weakened and split in two, which happens from time to time when air in the stratosphere above it warms. With the split, forecasts indicate one of the portions of the vortex may drift south toward Canada and the northern United States.  These weakened polar vortex conditions often drop temperatures well below normal (think single digits and sub-zero) and may lead to more snow, said Aaron Wilson, climate specialist with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural,...
  4. CFAES Wooster Science Building

    Media advisory: Virtual ribbon-cutting for new CFAES Wooster science building

    WOOSTER, Ohio—Please join us on Thursday for the official opening of the Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) Wooster Science Building.  What: Virtual Ribbon-cutting Ceremony for CFAES Wooster Science Building When: 10 a.m., Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021 Who: Join Ohio State vice president and CFAES Dean Cathann A. Kress and special guests How: View the ceremony via YouTube Live at  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ATygXHKZDQM&feature=youtu.be Register:  https://osu.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8Jn3BlujbR8LQ21 Background: The 60,000-square-foot, $33.5 million Wooster campus science building is a “great bright spot” for both students and researchers. Teaching labs, entomology research...
  5. Nearly 80,000 pounds of produce grown for food pantries statewide

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Master Gardener Volunteers from across Ohio grew nearly 80,000 pounds of produce in 2020 statewide and donated it all to 101 food pantries in cities and towns across the state. The Master Gardener Volunteer program is a U.S.- and Canada-wide effort that in Ohio is run by Ohio State University Extension, which is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The produce grown included fruits, vegetables, and herbs and was equivalent to 65,200 meals, according to Pam Bennett, state master gardener volunteer program director and horticulture educator with OSU Extension. Although Master Gardener Volunteers have grown and donated food through this program for 20 years, growers ramped up their...
  6. Sea Grant researcher Justin Chaffin in his lab.

    Ohio Colleges and Universities Invited to Submit Pre-Proposals for Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative

    COLUMBUS – Ohio Sea Grant, The Ohio State University, and The University of Toledo are requesting pre-proposals for one- to two-year research projects from Ohio colleges and universities as part of the Ohio Department of Higher Education’s Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative (HABRI). Pre-proposals must be submitted online by Thursday, February 18, 2021, at 5 p.m. EST.   The funding focuses on agency priorities aimed at reducing nutrient loading to Lake Erie via wetland design, identifying agricultural management practices that are both efficient and cost-effective, learning about algal toxin formation and human health impacts, and informing water treatment technologies. Addressing these priorities will help support agencies’ management decisions...
  7. Ohio State researchers are taking black raspberries and making highly controlled foods, such as a nectar, and studying them in the laboratory and in humans for anticancer activity. Photo: Getty Images.

    Co-op gift funds food-based cancer research

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—A $190,000 gift to the Cooperatives for the Cure Cancer Fund boosts food-based cancer research at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James), and Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The fund was created with the hope of finding a common goal for agricultural cooperatives to work together on bettering their communities through the support of cancer research. This year’s donation brings the total donated since 2009, when the effort began, to $1.5 million. Supporting the fund are two campaigns, Growing the Cure and Fueling the Cure, toward which the cooperatives donate money from soybean and corn...
  8. Judit Puskas and Monica Giusti

    Two Ohio State scientists elected to National Academy of Inventors

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Two faculty members in The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have been elected to the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) 2020 class of Fellows. Monica Giusti, professor of food science and technology, and Judit Puskas, professor of food, agricultural and biological engineering, join a class of 175 academic innovators representing universities and governmental or nonprofit research institutes named to the Fellows program this year. They are the 11th and 12th Ohio State inventors to be chosen as NAI Fellows. “The work done by our newest NAI Fellows demonstrates the breadth of research expertise that can be found at Ohio State – and, in this instance, within a single college,...
  9. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Yes, your poinsettia can survive after the holidays

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Bold when you buy them, poinsettias can wither as winter goes on.  It might be because of how they were treated. If they were exposed to cold drafts or perched by a heat vent, or if they sat in a cold car through too many errands, the leaves could turn yellow and fall off—even before the holidays or not long after.  Native to Mexico, poinsettias favor bright light and warm conditions. “You need to find a location in your house that provides good light. Six hours of bright light are necessary every day,” said Uttara Samarakoon, an assistant professor at Ohio State ATI in The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  The biggest mistakes people typically make are not providing...
  10. Horse standing in snow outside barn.

    Online equine classes offered by Ohio State ATI

    Whether you’re a horse owner or just a horse fanatic who can’t get enough of anything horse-related, you can take advantage of online equine courses at Ohio State ATI in Wooster, Ohio. The two equine courses planned for spring semester are horse health and disease, and horse breeding and selection.  Horse health and disease is a study of equine disease, lameness, and emergency first aid with emphasis on preventative health care and the manager’s role with the veterinary professional. Horse breeding and selection teaches the principles of equine breeding management with emphasis on applied equine reproductive physiology, breeding methods, breeding stock management, and basic genetics and selection.  Both courses include a hands-on lab that will meet...

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