News Releases

  1. A free Fulton County Breakfast on the Farm will provide consumers a firsthand look at modern food production.

    News tips and events for the week of May 20

    Tip 1: Breakfast on the farm. Ever wondered how a dairy farm operates or where your food comes from? Breakfast on the Farm, a free event on June 15, will provide consumers a firsthand look at modern food production, said Eric Richer, an Ohio State University Extension educator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The breakfast event is from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Henricks & Krieger Dairy, 14692 County Road 16-3, in Fayette, Ohio. The event is free but requires registration. Register at go.osu.edu/fultonbotfregister2019. The event allows the community to visit local farming operations, have a close-to-home agricultural experience, and interact with farm families who provide a wholesome food...
  2. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Learning to dine with diabetes

    My dad was recently diagnosed with diabetes and was advised to change his diet. Do you know of any local resource to help us understand which diet changes he’ll need to make?   One of the best resources your dad can turn to is his doctor, who might be able to connect him with a dietitian who can possibly help him tailor an eating plan specific to his dietary needs. Additionally, your dad and the rest of your family can learn more about diabetes and how to manage nutritional needs through a free online course created by Ohio State University Extension family and consumer sciences educators. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.  The course, Dining with Diabetes:Beyond the...
  3. Rain across the state has slowed progress on planting. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Late start on planting might not hurt yields much

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Despite rain that has stalled the planting of corn and soybeans across the state, yields might not be reduced, according to two grain specialists at The Ohio State University. That’s because weather later in the growing season can have a bigger impact on yields than the date the seeds go in the ground, said Peter Thomison and Laura Lindsey, both agronomists at Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). During July and August, too much or too little rain or really hot temperatures can be detrimental because that’s when corn plants form kernels and soybean plants form beans, Thomison and Lindsey said. Only 4% of this year’s corn crop has been planted compared to 50% this time last year; 2% of the...
  4. Photo: Getty Images

    News tips and events for the week of May 13

    Tip 1: Wet weather delays Ohio planting: Persistent rain and saturated soil conditions have delayed corn and soybean planting in much of Ohio thus far this planting season. For the week ended May 5, only 2% of Ohio’s projected corn acreage was planted. In comparison, 20% was planted at that same time last year, and 27% is the five-year average for that time. Soybean planting is also down, with only 1% of Ohio’s projected soybean acreage planted. In comparison, 7% was planted at that same time last year, and 9% is the five-year average for that same time. Many farmers statewide question whether they can still produce crops with strong yields after such late planting, so agronomists at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (...
  5. Food safety experts say never wash or rinse raw chicken. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Never a good idea to wash raw poultry

    I saw a discussion on social media this week that said not to wash raw chicken before cooking it. But I always rinse mine with a mixture of lime or lemon juice and vinegar, which my mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother did as well. Why should I stop doing that now? The fact is that you shouldn’t wash or rinse raw chicken or any other raw poultry before cooking it. Period. This is because rinsing or washing raw chicken doesn’t kill any bacterial pathogens such as campylobacter, salmonella, or other bacteria that might be on the inside and outside of raw chicken. But when you wash or rinse raw chicken, you are likely splashing chicken juices that can spread those pathogens in the kitchen and contaminate other foods, utensils, and countertops, according to the...
  6. Local food production has gained in popularity in part because consumers have lost some trust in larger food companies.

    Rural job growth rate in Ohio surpasses Columbus rate

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—In a surprising turn, Ohio’s rural counties of Wyandot and Holmes topped the job growth rate of Columbus between 2010 and 2018, according to an economist with The Ohio State University. And other rural counties including Harrison and Morgan nearly matched Columbus’ job growth rate during that same period, said Mark Partridge, an economics professor at Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Columbus, typically the state’s front-runner for job growth, experienced 18% job growth between 2010 and 2018, but Wyandot’s was 23% and Holmes’ was 20%. Both Morgan (16%) and Harrison (17%) counties’ job growth rates were just slightly less than the Columbus rate. “Rural Ohio is...
  7. News tips and events for the week of May 6

    Tip 1: Stone Lab growing: The Ohio State University Stone Laboratory, already the home of extensive long-term efforts to improve Lake Erie’s water quality, is adding a new research building at Put-in-Bay and new monitoring equipment on the Maumee River, Lake Erie’s largest tributary. It’s all thanks to funding provided by Ohio Senate Bill 299, the bipartisan Clean Lake 2020 Plan. Signed into law last summer, the plan provides funding for water quality programs that protect Lake Erie. Read more about the lab’s improvements in “Growing for science,” new on the college’s CFAES Stories website, at go.osu.edu/Cw5z.  Tip 2: New visitor center: Secrest Arboretum, located on the Wooster campus of The Ohio State University College of...
  8. Keith DiDonato Photo: Ken Chamberlain

    CFAES names new chief advancement officer

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Keith DiDonato has been appointed as the new chief advancement officer of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Starting on May 20, DiDonato will lead and develop the CFAES Office of Advancement, which includes fundraising, alumni relations, and marketing communications. Currently the associate vice president for development at The College of Wooster, DiDonato oversees the major and planned giving programs, annual giving, and the parents and family giving program. In that role, he is directly involved with the largest fundraising year in the history of the institution, adding $40 million to the school’s campaign.   DiDonato also worked as the director of leadership giving at Oberlin...
  9. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: More foodborne illness outbreaks detected last year

    It seems like there have been more foodborne illnesses in recent years. Is that true? Sort of. More outbreaks have been detected in recent years, although the overall number of foodborne illnesses is thought to have remained largely the same.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there was an uptick in the number of detected foodborne illness outbreaks last year. In fact, in a new report released last week, the CDC said that 120 Americans died as a result of foodborne illnesses last year and 25,606 Americans reported foodborne illnesses. Of those, 5,893 people required hospitalizations. The CDC said it investigated 23 multistate foodborne illness outbreaks last year, several of which included reported cases of foodborne illnesses in Ohio...
  10. A wide selection of annuals will be available at the Spring Plant Sale.

    Chadwick Arboretum to hold spring plant sale and auction

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Over 16,000 new and unusual perennials and annuals, native Ohio plants, herbs, and heirloom and organic vegetables will be offered at Chadwick Arboretum & Learning Gardens’ Spring Plant Sale and Auction Fundraiser set for May 9–11 on The Ohio State University’s Columbus campus. Hand-picked by a team of horticulturists with Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), all plants in the 32nd annual sale are disease-resistant, of high quality, and are adapted for growing well in Ohio. Visitors will also find colorful hanging baskets, specialty trees, edible plants, unusual and dwarf conifers, and rain garden plants. A preview party will be held for Chadwick Arboretum members, known as Friends of...

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