News Releases

  1. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Hold the raw, unpasteurized eggs from your holiday recipes

    I love to drink eggnog this time of year, and hollandaise sauce is a rich indulgence that puts me in the holiday mood. While I typically make my own eggnog and hollandaise sauce using raw eggs, this year my wife has asked me to avoid the raw eggs. What’s wrong with using raw eggs in those recipes? Count me in among those hundreds of thousands of consumers who indulge in rich, creamy, delicious eggnog this time of year! In fact, some 135 pounds of eggnog is consumed in this country each year, according to research from Indiana University.  But, if you are making your own eggnog—which is a sweetened, dairy-based drink traditionally made with milk, cream, sugar, whipped eggs, and spices—you should make sure that it is safe to drink. You can do this by using...
  2. Distinguished Professors of FAES

    Inaugural Distinguished Professors of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences announced

    COLUMBUS—The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) has announced four inaugural Distinguished Professors of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The title was bestowed on a competitive basis to four full professors who have excelled in teaching, research, or outreach/engagement. In addition, their work has significantly impacted their fields, students, college, university, and/or the public.  The honorees include environmental economist Elena Irwin, plant pathologist Sally Miller, food scientist Devin Peterson, and chemical engineer Judit Puskas. “The selection committee was extremely impressed with all of the nominees and their impactful contributions,” said Cathann A. Kress, vice president for...
  3. Registration open for Farmer and Farmland Owner Income Tax Webinar

    Columbus, Ohio—Are you getting the most from your tax return? Farmers and farmland owners wanting to increase their tax knowledge should consider a Monday, Jan. 13, webinar that will address tax issues specific to this industry. Content will focus on important tax issues and will offer insight into new tax legislation and further guidelines that have been released this year. The live webinar will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. and is being offered by OSU Income Tax Schools, which are a part of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and Ohio State University Extension, which is CFAES’ outreach arm. If you are unable to attend the live webinar, registered participants will receive a link to view the recorded webinar at a time...
  4. Compacted soil.

    News tips and events for the week of Dec. 9

    Tip 1:  Compaction is the topic of the 2020 Precision University. The fall of 2018 and spring of 2019 created less than ideal conditions for field work, leaving many farmers concerned with field compaction. When planting in wet soils, soil particles become pressed together, reducing space between them and limiting the flow of water. Farmer concern is justified as compaction can significantly reduce yields. Researchers have been conducting on-farm trials comparing farming practices to uncover ways farmers can reduce compaction. At the 2020 Precision University, Ohio State University Extension will host some of North America's leading experts on compaction research and management. Hear speakers from Oklahoma State University, Iowa State University, the Ontario...
  5. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Romaine lettuce alert affects Ohio, other states

    I saw that there’s been another alert about romaine lettuce. How do I know whether what’s in my fridge is part of the impacted varieties? Unless you can verify whether the romaine lettuce that’s in your fridge was NOT harvested from Salinas, California, you should throw it out. That’s per the latest warning from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which issued an updated food safety alert on Dec.4. The alert advises consumers, restaurants, and retailers to avoid eating or selling any romaine lettuce grown in the Salinas, California, growing region. This includes all use-by dates and brands of romaine lettuce from the area.  The warning is the result of the recent multistate outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:...
  6. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Late planting leads to wetter harvested grain

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—More Ohio farmers invested extra time and fuel this year to dry their harvested corn and soybeans because both grains were planted several weeks late and had less time to dry in the field. While drying harvested corn in a mechanical dryer is typical each year, some producers in the state dried soybeans this year for the first time ever. “Soybeans dry a whole lot better outside when it’s 70 degrees and you can run around in short sleeves. Farmers are harvesting in winter coats,” said Eric Richer, an Ohio State University Extension educator in Fulton County, on the far northwestern border of the state. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). If grain...
  7. (Photo: Getty Images)

    News tips and events for the week of Dec 2

    Tip 1: A bottle of red, a bottle of white: Learn the art of wine grape growing and wine production during the 2019 Grape and Wine Analysis Workshop Dec. 5 at The Ohio State University South Centers. Sip some wisdom and wine at the event, which is for established grape growers, wine makers, and anyone interested in getting started in the industry. Proven techniques for growing wine grapes and managing a vineyard will be revealed along with information about vine establishment, vine training, and vineyard maintenance. The $25 workshop, which includes lunch, will be at 1864 Shyville Road in Piketon. The South Centers is part of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). To register and for more information, go.osu.edu/wineworkshop2019 Tip...
  8. News tips and events for the week of Nov. 25

    Tip 1: Digging in: December’s monthly breakfast program by the Environmental Professionals Network (EPN) is called “Digging in With Ohio’s Soil Experts.” Eight Ohio scientists will speak on the hows and whys of having healthy soils. Among them will be Rattan Lal, Distinguished University Professor of Soil Science with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), who is a 2019 Japan Prize laureate and the 2018 Glinka World Soil Prize recipient. The event, which is open to the public and reporters but has a registration fee, is set for Dec. 4, the day before World Soil Day, on Ohio State’s campus in Columbus. EPN is a statewide professional group organized by CFAES’ School of...
  9. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: How long is too long for holiday leftovers?

    I typically make a large turkey (22 pounds) and plenty of trimmings because my family loves Thanksgiving leftovers. How many days after the holiday is the food safe to eat? Wow, it sounds like your family really loves turkey, as do I!  Many people often wonder how long it is safe to eat leftovers, not just during the holidays, but at any other time as well. The recommended refrigerated storage time for different foods can vary by food type, but in general, the refrigerated storage time is quite short, said Sanja Ilic, Food Safety State Specialist, Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. For instance, the U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends storing cooked...
  10. Algal bloom photo

    Ohio State Report Evaluates Options for Reducing Lake Erie’s Harmful Algal Blooms

    Several research teams, led by The Ohio State University, have concluded a three-year study evaluating the ability of agricultural management practices to reduce phosphorus-caused harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie. In 2012, the United States and Canada set the goal of reducing phosphorus entering the lake by 40%. Now, researchers have a better understanding of what management practices need to be implemented, and what research still needs to be done to meet these goals by 2025. The majority of phosphorus entering Lake Erie originates from the Maumee River watershed. More than 85% of the phosphorus entering the lake comes from agricultural sources such as fertilizer runoff. To address this, researchers are evaluating what agricultural management practices have potential to...

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