News Releases

  1. News tips and events for the week of Feb. 18

    Tip 1: Farming in Ohio cities: In formerly vacant city lots across Ohio, urban farms are increasingly sprouting up. Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), partners with urban growers to increase the production of local foods and to create jobs. Columbus now has an estimated 30 urban farms, and Cleveland has 45. OSU Extension offers training and resources to help members of urban agriculture operations get their farms up and running, and then sell their produce. An article on Ohio’s urban farms, which can be republished, is available at: go.osu.edu/urbanaginohio. Tip 2: Help for beginning and small farms: Running a farm of any size can be challenging but, for small farms, the...
  2. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Consider rotating use of GMO seeds to avoid resistance

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—It may be that a certain type of genetically modified corn or soybean seed works well, bringing high yields and sizeable profits. But planted in the same field, year after year, the same seed might not be the right choice, said Curtis Young, an entomologist with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). When the same genetically engineered crops are grown in the same field repeatedly—crops developed to produce toxins that kill insects, for example, or to survive weed-killing sprays—the target insects or weeds begin to adapt. They can become resistant to the toxins or weed killer. Take, for example, soybean seeds that are genetically engineered to tolerate glyphosate, a chemical that kills weeds. A...
  3. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Dietary supplements to gain increased federal scrutiny

    I’ve been thinking about adding a dietary supplement as part of my daily routine. But I’m not sure how or if dietary supplements are regulated. Unlike over-the-counter medications, dietary supplements are regulated more like food products than like drugs. Supplements, which are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, will now be subject to “new enforcement strategies,” including a new rapid-response tool that can alert consumers to unsafe products, the FDA said in a written statement this week. The move is “one of the most significant modernizations of dietary supplement regulation and oversight in more than 25 years,” FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said. “FDA’s priorities for dietary supplements are to ensure that they...
  4. The frequent rain is filling up manure ponds and lagoons across the state. (Photo: CFAES)

    Showers limiting days for spreading livestock manure

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Rain falls, and that might make some farmers happy, depending on the time of year. Then, a lot of rain falls, off and on, for months, and not only do fields fill up with water, but so do manure ponds and lagoons, and that might make some farmers a bit nervous. Ohio had the third wettest year ever in 2018, and there’s been little letup since then, leaving farm fields across the state saturated. For farmers with a lot of livestock, spreading manure onto wet land as fertilizer is not an option right now, and manure ponds are filling up fast.   Because manure ponds and lagoons are outdoors and uncovered, they collect not only animal waste from livestock housed inside, but they also collect rainwater. Indoor pits located under livestock holding...
  5. Damage from dicamba, a weed killer, can include cupping of soybean leaves. (Photo: CFAES)

    News tips and events for the week of Feb. 11

    Tip 1: Preparing for new rules on dealing with dicamba: Anyone who buys, handles, or applies certain dicamba products on a growing crop that’s resistant to the weed killer now has to be a licensed pesticide applicator and has to take dicamba training. These new requirements aim to reduce the potential for dicamba to drift onto sensitive crops. The Environmental Protection Agency on Oct. 31 required changes to labels of three dicamba products: Xtendimax, Engenia, and FeXapan. The changes detail additional stipulations on when and how to use the product to try to protect nearby fields. Staff affiliated with the Ohio State University Pesticide Safety Education Program have prepared training videos to assist growers in preparing for the Core Pesticide applicator exam. Ohio State...
  6. A comparison of the old and new food nutrition labels. Photo: U. S. Food and Drug Administration.

    Chow Line: Understanding the new food nutrition labels

    What are some of the changes I can expect to see on the new food nutrition labels? One of the biggest changes is a larger, bolder typeface for both calories and serving sizes. The typeface will be easier for people to see and read. In 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the updated food nutrition label design. According to the FDA, the new design was part of an effort to reflect updated scientific findings to help consumers make better-informed decisions about food choices and maintaining healthy diets. While the new labels are already on about 10 percent of food packages currently being sold, the FDA is requiring food manufacturers with $10 million or more in annual food sales to have the labels on all of their products by next year. Manufacturers with less...
  7. News tips and events for the week of Feb. 4

    Tip 1: Economics of nationalism conference: Ian Sheldon, professor and Andersons Chair of Agricultural Marketing, Trade and Policy at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), is one of 12 experts slated to speak at the Feb. 8 Economic Nationalism and Trade Conference at Ohio State’s Columbus campus. Speakers will also come from business, trade groups, law schools, and other universities, both from the United States and internationally. Presentations will be grouped under three key topics: international trade law, the economics of nationalism, and the cost of economic nationalism. Registration is free and is open to the public and the media. Register by Feb. 7 at go.osu.edu/Ch3X; find the full speaker lineup and other...
  8. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Protecting yourself from hepatitis A

    I just heard about a recent health warning advising people who had visited a central Ohio restaurant last month to get a hepatitis A vaccine. What is hepatitis A, and why would people who were at the restaurant need a vaccine? Hepatitis A is a highly contagious virus that infects a person’s liver. It can be spread through close contact with a person who has hepatitis A or by eating food prepared by a person with hepatitis A. The recent warning concerns consumers who patronized Fuzzy’s Taco Shop, 479 N. High St. in Columbus, Ohio, from Jan. 1–16 of this year. Columbus Public Health issued the warning after a person who had direct contact with food at the restaurant was diagnosed with hepatitis A. According to Columbus Public Health, consumers who ate at the...
  9. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Rainy days lead to muddy, thinner cows

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Stuck in the mud, some cows across the state might not be putting on enough weight. Cattle have been getting pretty muddy as a result of Ohio’s extremely heavy rainfall in 2018 and precipitation so far this year. The mud can lead to thinner cows because it takes a lot of energy for cattle to trudge through mud and to keep their bodies warm when cold mud sticks to them, said John Grimes, beef coordinator for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Pregnant cows that don’t gain enough weight are at risk of having weak or stillborn calves and of not being able to produce enough milk for their offspring, Grimes said. “When...
  10. Dig into soil health at Feb. 14 workshop

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—The answers to growing better crops are under your feet if you look. So says Steve Culman, soil fertility specialist at The Ohio State University, who is helping lead an upcoming workshop on how to test your soil. “Soil testing provides a window into the soil, revealing if a plant is likely to see the nutrients it needs to grow and thrive,” said Culman, based at the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The workshop, called “Digging Into Soil Health: What Tests Can Tell Us About Our Soil,” will be Feb. 14 in Dayton. It’s part of the annual conference of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA), which runs from Feb. 14–16. Now celebrating its 40th year, the OEFFA conference is...

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