News Releases

  1. High yields on corn and soybeans, plus expected government payments, will help farmers contend with the slump in commodity prices. (Photo: Getty Images)

    High Yields and Aid Help Offset Low Commodity Prices

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Record-high crop yields and new government aid are expected to help insulate Ohio crop farmers from significant financial losses that would have occurred because of low commodity prices, according to a recent Ohio State University study. If net income for farms across Ohio this year follows the projected national trend, then it will decrease by 15 percent compared to last year’s total. But it could have been a whole lot worse. Fortunately, Ohio farmers, on average, are basking in high yields. The average yields of both soybeans and corn are projected to beat the state’s previous record highs. Soybeans, which are estimated to average 60 bushels per acre, are expected to top last year’s average by 19 percent, and the 190 bushel-per-acre...
  2. Photo: Getty Images

    Tips and Events for the Week of Oct. 15

    Tip 1: How to deal with the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act—The new tax law for both individuals and businesses is among the topics to be discussed during the Income Tax School workshop series offered throughout November and December by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) at The Ohio State University. The annual series helps tax preparers learn about federal tax law changes and updates for this year, as well as issues they may encounter when filing individual and small business 2018 tax returns, said Barry Ward, director of the Income Tax School program. The tax schools are intermediate-level courses that focus on interpreting tax regulations and changes in tax laws to help tax preparers, accountants, financial planners and attorneys advise their clients, he...
  3. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Some Synthetic Food Flavoring Additives Banned

    What are synthetic food flavoring additives and why have some of them banned from use? The Food and Drug Administration announced last week that it was banning the use of seven commonly used synthetic food-flavoring additives that have been linked to the development of cancer in laboratory studies of animals. The flavorings, many of which are used in many brands of chewing gum, candy, breakfast cereals, beer, packaged ice cream and some baked goods, were removed from the FDA’s approved usage list based on the findings of several studies. Those findings were used as the basis of petitions asking the government to stop allowing the synthetic food flavoring additives to be used in food, the government agency said. The petitions were generated from several groups including the...
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    Tips and Events for the Week of Oct. 8

    Tip 1: Ready Your Farm for the Public: On Oct. 4, a 2-year-old Nebraska boy died after a gust of wind overturned a bounce pad he was on at a public pumpkin patch. The tragedy raises questions about how farmers who open their farms to the public through pumpkin patches, zip lines or pick-your-own farms can prevent dangerous situations. Lisa Pfeifer can address what Ohio residents can do to ensure safety on their farms. Pfeifer is the educational program manager with the agricultural safety and health team in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) at The Ohio State University. She can be reached at pfeifer.6@osu.edu or 614-292-9455. Tip 2: The Spiritual Side of Farming: The focus of the 12th annual Stinner Summit will be on “The Roles of Faith and...
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    Chow line: Food Safety Techniques Important for Dogs, too

    Is raw pet food ok to serve to my dog? While many pet owners may prefer to feed their furry family members raw pet food, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that’s not such a good idea. This is because pathogens like salmonella and listeria have been found in some raw pet foods, even in some of those brands that are sold pre-packaged in stores, CDC says. Since these germs can make your pet sick, it’s best not to feed them to your dog. Studies from the U.S. Department of Food and Drug Administration have found that there are more harmful germs in raw pet food than any other type of pet food. And, if you handle these raw pet foods and don’t wash your hands afterwards, they can make you and your family sick as well. Such was the case in February...
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    New Trade Deal Helps, But Hurdles Remain

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — The newly renegotiated trade agreement involving the United States, Canada and Mexico offers farmers a bit more security about markets for dairy, corn and other products, but hefty Mexican tariffs still in place hinder business, according to an agricultural trade specialist with The Ohio State University. Under the new trade agreement, dairy farmers in the United States will have 3.75 percent more access to the Canadian dairy market. That means they’ll be able to sell more of their cheese, milk and other products there without those products getting taxed heavily at the Canadian border. “Dairy farmers in Ohio should be happy,” said Ian Sheldon, an agricultural economist who serves as the Andersons Chair in Agricultural Marketing, Trade and...
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    To Measure Food Waste, Ohio State Students Dig Into It

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — This sounds more like a dare than research. Student employees at The Ohio State University willingly don plastic suits and masks to dig into trash and pull out tossed food in its various forms: partly eaten, uneaten, wet and reeking. Then they weigh it. Not a task for the squeamish, for sure. But apparently the effort to measure and eventually cut food waste on campus somehow outweighs the ickiness of smelling, touching and just standing beside garbage. “It’s usually fresh garbage which is better than old garbage,” said Mary Leciejewski, who helps organize the food waste audits. True, but still. “They’re a tough bunch,” said Leciejewski, senior sustainability coordinator for Ohio State’s Facilities, Operations...
  8. Tips and Events for the Week of Oct. 1

    Tip 1: He’s Making Their Craft Beer Sustainable: Vinny Valentino is doing his part to make the craft beer industry more sustainable. A 2015 graduate of the Environment, Economy, Development, and Sustainability program in The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), he’s now the sustainability manager of Columbus’ Land-Grant Brewing Company. Read an engaging profile of the rock-and-roller-turned-renaissance-man on the CFAES Stories website, go.osu.edu/CbC7. Media are welcome to republish the story; contact Sherrie Whaley, 614-292-2137, whaley.3@osu.edu, for the accompanying high-res photos. Tip 2: Check for Stink Bugs in Soybeans: Ohio soybean growers should be checking their...
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    Chow Line: Internal Temperature of 165 F Needed for Chicken to Prevent Foodborne Illness

    Does chicken have to be cooked to one uniform temperature, or can it be eaten like steak — rare, medium rare, medium or well done? Great question, considering that American consumers eat more chicken than any other meat, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. However, unlike steak, all chicken dishes should be cooked to an internal temperature of 165 degrees F to ensure that they are cooked thoroughly enough to kill any pathogens that could cause a foodborne illness, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It’s best to use a food thermometer placed in the thickest part of the chicken to make sure it is cooked to a safe internal temperature of 165 degrees F. Raw chicken can be contaminated with the bacterial pathogens...
  10. The chemical formula of Glyphosate

    Tips and Events for the Week of Sept. 24

    Tip 1: Glyphosate and Cancer – Glyphosate weed killer has been in the news in recent months. In August, a jury awarded $289 million in damages to a California pesticide applicator who sued Monsanto over the claim that glyphosate caused his cancer. However, pesticide applicators have also received reassurances from the 2018 Agricultural Health Study and other risk assessments that glyphosate is not carcinogenic at real-world exposure levels. Since 1993, the U.S. Agricultural Health Study has examined how agricultural practices affect cancer and health outcomes among licensed pesticide applicators. An analysis in 2001 showed no significant associations between glyphosate and cancer. In 2018, an updated analysis of the Agricultural Health Study data included 54,252 pesticide...

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