News Releases

  1. A detailed look at what's new on the updated nutrition facts label. Photo: FDA

    Chow Line: New nutrition labels reflect more accurate serving sizes

    There seems to be something different about the nutrition label on some of the foods I’ve purchased lately. Did the labels change? Yes. In fact, the nutrition labels on some foods have changed and will soon change on other food products, thanks to new rules instituted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The FDA announced the updated nutrition label design in 2016 as part of an effort to reflect updated scientific findings to help consumers make better-informed decisions about food choices and maintain healthy diets, the government agency said. One of the biggest changes consumers can expect to see is a larger, bolder typeface for both calories and serving sizes. The typeface will be easier for people to see and read. And the serving sizes have been updated to better...
  2. News tips and events for the week of Feb. 24

    Tip 1: Conservation tillage conference—Learn about cover crops, beneficial insects, fertilizer application, and more at the Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference March 3–4 at Ohio Northern University in Ada. Co-sponsored by CFAES, the conference offers numerous talks related to the challenges of low- and no-till crop production. The event’s keynote speaker is Lee Briese, a crop consultant with Centrol Inc., a North Dakota crop consulting firm. For more information, visit ctc.osu.edu.   February 2020 25 Environmental Film Series, Living Soil (importance of soil health to food security, human health, economics, and more; includes interview with CFAES Distinguished University Professor of Soil Science Rattan Lal), 7–8:50 p....
  3. Photo: A transmission electron micrograph of a coronavirus. Courtesy of Linda Saif.

    News tips and events for the week of Feb. 17

    Tip 1: Coronavirus and Global One Health —Linda Saif, a scientist with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM), will present a talk,“Coronaviruses: Global threats to humans and animals,” as part of Ohio State’s Global One Health initiative monthly webinar Feb. 20, from 9-10 a.m. Saif is known nationally and internationally for her work on enteric viruses, including coronaviruses, which affect food-producing animals, wildlife, and humans. Saif is also a member of Ohio State’s Infectious Diseases Institute (IDI), where she is a co-director for the Viruses and Emerging Pathogens Program. She is also  a member of the National...
  4. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Going out for Valentine’s Day? Pay attention to the details when dining out

    With Valentine’s Day falling on a Friday this year, you’re likely to run into a crowd at almost any restaurant you choose to dine in. In fact, Valentine’s Day is the most popular reservation day of the year for most restaurants, according to the National Restaurant Association. For example, consumers plan to spend $4.3 billion on an evening out this year for Valentine’s day, according to the National Retail Federation.  With that in mind, making sure that your food is cooked thoroughly is just one way to protect yourself when eating out at a restaurant, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  In a Feb. 5 posting from the CDC, consumers are advised to follow these suggestions to prevent developing a foodborne illness from a night out to...
  5. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Warning: Coyotes could be watching you

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Increasingly drawn to life in and around cities, coyotes might be losing their tendency to be reclusive and their fear of the neighbors. A researcher with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) is trying to find out: Has city life changed coyotes? Wildlife biologist Stan Gehrt, who has researched coyotes in the Chicago area for the past two decades, recently began a study on the personality of coyotes in Columbus, Cleveland and Cincinnati, in addition to those in Chicago. Gehrt will explore whether coyotes living in or around cities are becoming more bold, and if so, what’s causing the change in their disposition. If these wild urban dwellers have become more audacious, was the change a result of...
  6. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Fertilizer applied years ago still affects Lake Erie

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Although corn or soybeans could not be planted on 1.6 million acres of Ohio farmland last year and little to no fertilizer was applied to those fields, the amount of phosphorus entering Lake Erie still was high. That might seem odd. After all, many of those unplanted acres were in northwest Ohio, the region that feeds into the Maumee River and ultimately into Lake Erie. But a lot of phosphorus was already present in fields from fertilizer applied years before, and older phosphorus is another contributor to the level of phosphorus in Lake Erie, said Greg LaBarge, an Ohio State University Extension field specialist. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Phosphorus runoff from...
  7. (Photo: Getty Images)

    News tips and events for the week of Feb. 10

    Tip 1: Sowing Seeds of Success—Anyone just starting out in farming or interested in doing so could learn some basics about raising produce, managing livestock, and how to market their products, at the March 14 Small Farm Conference and Trade Show at The Ohio State University at Mansfield. Sponsored by Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), the event will include talks on growing produce in greenhouses, timber harvesting, fencing for livestock and raising hops, hemp, and barley. Anyone unsure about how to make a sufficient profit on just a few acres of land or how to raise or market produce could gain some helpful advice from attending this daylong conference. For more information, visit go.osu.edu/osufarmconference2020. Tip 2:...
  8. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: The difference between broth and stock

    My dad asked me to pick up chicken stock from the store for a meal that he wants to make for dinner. When I got to the store, I bought chicken broth and brought it home. He sent me back to the store because he said stock and broth aren’t the same thing. But aren’t they really? No, they are not.  Your dad is correct. There is a difference between broth and stock, and depending on which recipe he was making, the difference between the two could have an impact on the outcome of the meal. This is because, generally speaking, broth is lighter and more flavorful, while stock is thicker. To understand the difference, it’s important to understand what stocks and broths are. Stocks and broths are liquids used to make sauces, soups, stews, and other recipes. The...
  9. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Fighting the flu: how to protect yourself and your herd

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—While many choose to arm themselves against the flu virus with a vaccine, it is even more important for those who work around animals to protect themselves.   Influenza affects a wide range of animals, and flu among pigs poses a serious threat to people because flu in other livestock is not as transferable to people.  “The vast majority of influenza viruses circulating in pigs today has actually come from people,” said Andrew Bowman, associate professor in the Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine at The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM).   This is likely because producers or farmers sometimes go into the barn while they are feeling under the weather and are infected with the influenza virus...
  10. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Burned out caring for someone? Attend this workshop

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—As people age and some become disabled, they may need a caregiver, and while that role can be fulfilling, it also can be exhausting and sometimes isolating. Anyone who cares for another likely has experienced the stress and possibly the feelings of helplessness that can come with taking care of an ailing person. To help caregivers through the many hurdles, The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) is co-hosting a workshop on Feb. 22. The workshop is for people who care for someone who is disabled or sick, adult children concerned about aging parents, as well as those who work for long-term care facilities. “Caregiving can be very meaningful work. And it’s also really hard work, ” said...

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