News Releases

  1. (Photo: Andrew Klopfenstein)

    Digital Agriculture program celebrates Ohio State’s sesquicentennial

    LONDON, Ohio—For the past 150 years, The Ohio State University has been a leader in advancements in agriculture and engineering. And now, using precision agriculture technology, Ohio State researchers are able to show how technology can be used to create an image of a logo commemorating the university’s 150th anniversary in a soybean field. This is the fifth year that Ohio State’s Digital Agriculture program has demonstrated GPS-guided “smart planting” for multiple hybrids of corn and soybeans. This year’s specially planted field takes the shape of the symbol of Ohio State’s sesquicentennial. The soybeans planted to create the logo matured faster than the brighter, greener soybeans that form the image’s background. “This being...
  2. Photo: Ken Chamberlain

    News tips and events for the week of Sept. 16

    Tip 1: Farm Science Review, the annual agricultural trade show sponsored by The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), is Sept. 17–19 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center, 135 State Route 38 NE, London, Ohio. The show offers talks, displays, field demonstrations, and hundreds of commercial exhibitors. Visitors can also attend an agriculture industry career fair, and peruse the latest in farm machinery and technology. FSR features 4,000 product lines and over 700 commercial and educational exhibits, as well as workshops and presentations delivered by CFAES experts. Expected total attendance is more than 100,000. FSR hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Sept. 17–18 and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sept. 19. Tickets for the event are $7...
  3. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Fall vegetable options plentiful

    I love to eat seasonal produce such as strawberries in the spring and sweet corn in the summer, but besides apples, I’m not sure what’s in season now. Can you tell me which fruits and vegetables are seasonal in the fall? Your question is very similar to another that was asked in a “Chow Line” column from September 2017, so it’s best answered by reissuing that column here. Fall is a good time to start looking to buy pears, apples, and hard squash, among many other seasonal fruits and vegetables. In fact, those are some of the items that many grocery stores typically start to promote heavily at discounted prices in their grocery aisles, according to the National Retail Report, a weekly roundup of advertised retail pricing information compiled by the U.S....
  4. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Fall vegetable options plentiful

    I love to eat seasonal produce such as strawberries in the spring and sweet corn in the summer, but besides apples, I’m not sure what’s in season now. Can you tell me which fruits and vegetables are seasonal in the fall? Your question is very similar to another that was asked in a “Chow Line” column from September 2017, so it’s best answered by reissuing that column here. Fall is a good time to start looking to buy pears, apples, and hard squash, among many other seasonal fruits and vegetables. In fact, those are some of the items that many grocery stores typically start to promote heavily at discounted prices in their grocery aisles, according to the National Retail Report, a weekly roundup of advertised retail pricing information compiled by the U.S....
  5. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Hemp holds potential for Ohio farmers

    LONDON, Ohio—Ohio’s recent legalization of growing and processing hemp comes at a time when the state’s farmers might be especially interested in finding more sources of income. Though costly to grow, hemp can be profitable particularly as a source for cannabidiol (CBD) oil, an extract produced from hemp seeds and used to treat various illnesses, said Peggy Hall, agricultural and resource law field specialist for The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Markets for Ohio-grown hemp products are just starting to be developed. Still, hemp holds potential for farmers in the state, Hall said. An unprecedented number of Ohio farmers this year had to either plant late in the season or could not plant at all because of...
  6. CFAES names director of new Water Quality Initiative

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) has named Ohio scientist Heather Raymond as director of its new Water Quality Initiative. She began her appointment Sept. 1. Raymond, a national leader on policies and responses regarding harmful algal blooms, joins CFAES from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, where she was state harmful algal bloom (HAB) coordinator and lead hydrogeologist. She was also recently elected to serve on the National HAB Committee.  Harmful algal blooms are the often pea-green, sometimes-toxic slime outbreaks plaguing water bodies including Lake Erie. “We’re fortunate to have recruited someone with so much expertise and experience in water quality,”...
  7. New Ohio State center focuses on improving food safety, preventing foodborne illness

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—At The Ohio State University, a new food safety center will provide a centralized location for food safety resources and will further establish the university as a global leader in food safety.  The Center for Foodborne Illness Research and Prevention (CFI) will bring its 13-year record of protecting public health to Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  Founded as a nonprofit organization in December 2006, CFI’s mission is to advance a more scientific, risk-based food safety system that prevents foodborne illnesses and protects public health by translating science into policy and practice, said Barbara Kowalcyk, a CFAES assistant professor of food science and technology and an internationally...
  8. Photo: Ken Chamberlain

    Farm Science Review: Helping farmers mitigate 2019 farm crisis

    LONDON, Ohio—Whether it’s learning how to navigate new tax laws or understanding the complexities of the U.S. trade policy and its impact on agriculture, Ohio farmers likely have a lot of questions as they work through the 2019 farm crisis. Faculty and staff of The Ohio State UniversityCollege of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) will answer some of those questions and address some of the top farm management challenges facing Ohio farmers in 2019 during next week’s Farm Science Review. The annual farm trade show, sponsored by CFAES, takes place Sept. 17–19 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center, 135 State Route 38 NE, in London, Ohio. The 2019 growing season has been particularly challenging for Ohio growers and producers due to the...
  9. (Photo: Getty Images)

    News tips and events for the week of Sept. 9

    Tip 1: Solar farms spreading in Ohio: With large-scale solar energy development on the rise in Ohio, some of the state’s farmland owners are being sought out to lease their land for these projects. In the past two years, the Ohio Power Siting Board has approved six large-scale solar projects with generating capacities of 50 megawatts or more, and three more projects are pending approval. Typically, lease agreements between solar energy developers and landowners require a long-term legal commitment of 25 years or more. Leasing land for a solar energy development raises implications for the land, family, farm operation, and community. Legal and energy experts from the The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) have developed a free...
  10. Master Gardener Volunteer Amy Chenevy shows veteran Jeff Smallwood how to transplant tomatoes in the Heroes Garden. Photo: Mike Hogan.

    Veteran farming program offers heroes help

    Bob Udeck gingerly uses his hands and feet to slowly steer his four-wheeled walker carefully through the dirt- and grass-covered field, adeptly maneuvering through the ruts, divets, mounds of dirt, rocks, and plants that line the path leading to the Heroes Garden. The 74-year-old Vietnam veteran pulls up to a section of raised garden beds filled with rows of radish and pepper plants and smiles as he admires his handy work: Many of the plants have already begun bearing fruit, some of which were ripe and ready for picking. “I used to farm when I was younger,” Udeck said, as he wistfully looked out over the plot that houses the Veteran Farming Program. “It feels really good to get your hands dirty again—planting something, nurturing it, and watching it produce...

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