News Releases

  1. Temple Grandin

    News tips and events for the week of Aug. 19

    Tip 1: Animal expert and livestock guru Temple Grandin featured at September CHAIRE event. The annual fundraising event for The Ohio State University’s Center for Human-Animal Interactions Research and Education (CHAIRE) will focus on “Animals in Our Lives” on Sept. 30, from 5–8 p.m. at the Dave Thomas Conference Center, One Dave Thomas Blvd. in Dublin, Ohio. The program will include dinner, a silent auction, animal behaviorist Peter Neville, and animals from the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium. Temple Grandin, a professor of animal science at Colorado State University and a world-renowned designer of livestock handling facilities, will give a presentation. Diagnosed with autism as a child, Grandin will talk about how her mind works, giving her the ability to “...
  2. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: FDA warns consumers to stop drinking sodium chlorite products

    I just saw a social media post warning against drinking Miracle Mineral Solution. What is it, and why shouldn’t I drink it? Miracle Mineral Solution is a mixture of distilled water and sodium chlorite. It is sold online as a purported treatment for several diseases and conditions, according to the U. S. Food and Drug Administration. But, instead of helping consumers, the product has sickened numerous people who’ve ingested it, the FDA said As a result, the federal agency this week warned consumers to stop drinking the product, which is also known by several names including Miracle or Master Mineral Solution, Miracle Mineral Supplement, MMS, Chlorine Dioxide Protocol, and Water Purification Solution, according to the FDA. “Some distributors are making false...
  3. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Ohio stable in farm bankruptcies, while nation is up

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Farm bankruptcies across the nation are up, but Ohio’s rate remains among the lowest in the Midwest, according to a new analysis by researchers at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Ohio had nine new farm bankruptcy filings from July 1, 2018, to June 30, 2019. That’s compared to 45 in Wisconsin, 39 in Kansas, and 32 in Minnesota—the three states in the nation with the highest number of new filings during that period. Farm bankruptcies in Ohio have been stable in recent years, with a total of under 10 annually since 2017, said Robert Dinterman, a post-doctoral researcher in agribusiness at CFAES. Dinterman and Ani Katchova, associate professor, analyzed farm bankruptcy trends in the past...
  4. Film fest to focus on agriculture, environment, and rural communities

    The inaugural Germinate International Film Fest, set for August 16–17 in Hillsboro, Ohio, will use film and photography to tell the story of rural communities and their associated industries. One of the only film festivals of its kind, the two-day event is being sponsored by The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and Ohio State University Extension, CFAES’ outreach arm. “Less than 2% of the nation’s population now identify as farmers,” said Brooke Beam, festival director and Extension educator in Highland County. “The intent of the festival is to expand what people know about agriculture, natural resources, and rural communities.” It will include screenings of both feature films and...
  5. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Stress task force offering help to struggling Ohio farmers

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Dairy farmers grapple with slumps in milk prices while the cost of feeding their cows keeps rising. For crop farmers, prices for corn and soybeans remain low, and many growers couldn’t plant either crop this year. The persistent spring rain created the state’s worst planting year on record and has contributed to a near-record low level of hay to feed livestock in Ohio and across the Midwest. So much is out of a farmer’s control. Weather. Commodity and feed prices. A hike in international tariffs on American agricultural goods that has diminished demand for them. When rain this past spring kept farmers from planting, among the comments that circulated on Facebook was one offering a phone number for a suicide hotline.   Now, perhaps...
  6. Ohio State research has shown that air pollution remains a serious problem in low-income neighborhoods, and especially neighborhoods of color.

    Low-income, black neighborhoods still hit hard by air pollution

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Disease-causing air pollution remains high in pockets of America—particularly those where many low-income and African American people live, a disparity highlighted in research presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association in New York. The nation’s air on the whole has become cleaner in the past 70 years, but those benefits are seen primarily in whiter, higher-income areas, said Kerry Ard, an associate professor of environmental sociology at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Ard presented her research at the annual meeting on Aug. 10. Ard used a variety of detailed data sources to examine air pollution and the demographics of the people who lived in 1-...
  7. Photo: Getty Images

    News tips and events for the week of Aug. 12

    Tip 1: Seminar on Precision Livestock Farming: Daniel Berckmans, emeritus professor, animal and human health engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium, will discuss how smart technology monitoring can be used for animal welfare and human health engineering. The “Precision Livestock Farming (PLF): A Game Changer for the Worldwide Livestock Production” seminar is Aug. 15 from 10–11:30 a.m. in room250A, in the Agricultural Administration Building, 2120 Fyffe Road, in Columbus. Hosted by The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering (FABE), the seminar will discuss how emerging smart technology can be used to improve our ability to spot and treat animal...
  8. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Food safety and homemade fruit- or vegetable-infused water

    I’m planning to add either fresh strawberry or cucumber slices to a pitcher of water to serve with a lunch I’m hosting. Are there any food safety concerns that I need to be aware of when making fruit- or vegetable-infused water? Infusing water with fruits or vegetables is a wonderful, healthy, and delicious way to add flavor to water without adding sugar. Not only is infused water a simple way to stay hydrated, but it has also become increasingly popular among consumers who are seeking healthy alternatives to sugary drinks. However, when preparing fruit- or vegetable-infused water, it’s important to keep food safety in mind to prevent the potential of developing a foodborne illness. In fact, you should handle infused water as you would any perishable food,...
  9. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Farm Science Review to offer career fair

    LONDON—Looking for a job in agriculture? Come to Farm Science Review and you just might find one. For the first time, the annual agricultural trade show, sponsored by The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), will offer the Career Exploration Fair for anyone interested in working in agriculture. On Sept. 18 from 10 a.m. to noon, visitors to the career fair can discuss jobs and internships with representatives from a variety of companies, many of them exhibitors at FSR, which is held at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center near London, Ohio. “With the hundreds of exhibiting companies, it’s a great place to look for another job or new career,” said Nick Zachrich, manager of FSR. The job fair will take...
  10. Frogeye leaf spot is one of the diseases growers should look out for, particularly among late-planted soybean plants. (Photo: CFAES)

    Planted late? Watch out for diseases

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Late-planted corn and soybeans could be vulnerable to higher-than-normal levels of crop diseases this year, experts from The Ohio State University warn. When sown one to two months later than usual, corn and soybeans stand a greater chance of succumbing, especially, to fungal diseases. Dry weather across much of Ohio since July has helped stave off some disease spread because fungal diseases need moisture to thrive. Still, during a year when late planting has already limited the yield potential on crops, it’s critical to be watchful for other threats too, including all types of diseases, molds, and insects, advise experts with Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Fungal diseases that can infect either...

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