News Releases

  1. Photo: Thinkstock

    News tips and events for the week of Jan. 22

    Tip 1: EFields Report: On the farm, data can be crucial in helping make the right decisions. The recently released eFields 2018 Report offers data about tests done on 95 farms in 25 Ohio counties. The topics researched in the report include nutrient management, seeding, crop management, soil compaction management, remote sensing, and data analysis and management. Each study includes information about weather, soil types, and management practice. Elizabeth Hawkins, an Ohio State University agronomist based in Clinton County, can address media questions about the report. She can be reached at hawkins.301@osu.edu or 937-382-0901. January 2019 events 24 Grafting Workshop, 8 a.m. to noon, Jack and Deb Miller Pavilion, Secrest Arboretum, OARDC, CFAES Wooster Campus, 1680 Madison Ave...
  2. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Meal kits and other food delivery services should include a focus on food safety

    I’m using a meal kit delivery service for the first time. What do I need to be aware of when ordering, and when the food arrives? Meal kit delivery and food preparation services have grown in popularity in recent years, with revenue in that sector expected to grow to over $10 billion in 2020, up from $1 billion in 2015, according to Statista, Inc., a New York-based market and consumer data firm. Ease and convenience are some of the factors for that increase, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. But, it’s important that safe food handling methods are used when receiving food through a mail delivery service, especially when receiving perishable foods, food safety experts say. Whether it be a subscription meal kit, mail-ordered food, or groceries delivered...
  3. The first medical glove to block radiation and pathogens while not causing allergies was developed by Ohio State researcher Katrina Cornish and her team. (Photo: CFAES)

    Ohio State researcher creates innovative medical gloves

    WOOSTER, Ohio—An Ohio State University researcher and her team have created the first medical glove that can block radiation while meeting federal guidelines and not triggering allergic reactions. This glove also will eliminate the need for medical professionals working with radiation to double-glove to follow the federal requirement that they protect against both bloodborne pathogens and radiation. “Wearing two different gloves on each hand is like doing surgery in boxing gloves,” said Katrina Cornish, an Ohio Research Scholar and holder of the Endowed Chair in Bio-based Emergent Materials at the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The awkwardness of wearing two different gloves leads some medical professionals to use only one...
  4. Japan Prize goes to CFAES soil scientist Rattan Lal

    TOKYO—Rattan Lal, a soil scientist at The Ohio State University, has been awarded the 2019 Japan Prize, considered one of the most prestigious honors in science and technology. Lal is the first Ohio State scientist and the first soil scientist to ever receive the prize. He is Distinguished University Professor of Soil Science at the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The Japan Prize recognizes scientists and engineers from around the world for original and outstanding achievements that “not only contribute to the advancement of science and technology, but also promote peace and prosperity for all mankind,” the Japan Prize Foundation said today (Jan. 16) in announcing the award. Lal, whose career in science spans five decades...
  5. (Photo: Getty Images)

    News tips and events for the week of Jan. 14

    Tip 1: Soybean Prices Rebounding? Soybean prices showed early strength at the start of the New Year, in part because of lower estimates of soybean production in Brazil, the world’s top supplier. The rise may also be because of optimism over a potential trade deal with China, the leading soybean consumer in the world, said Ben Brown, manager of the farm management program in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University (CFAES). The recent price increases are a welcome change in a market that has contended with a dip in prices over the past six months. Brown is available to discuss the price trends and provide future projections. He can be reached at brown.6888@osu.edu, 614-688-8686, or 660-492-7574 (cell). Brown and others from CFAES...
  6. Milk and eggs are among the most common foods identified as allergens among U.S. adults. Photo: Getty Images.

    Chow Line: Some food allergies really aren’t food allergies

    My husband has always assumed he is allergic to strawberries, but it turns out that he’s not allergic at all. He just has an intolerance to them. How common is that? Very, it seems. According to a new study published this week in the journal JAMA Network Open, nearly half of the people who think they have food allergies, really don’t. Instead, many people may suffer from food intolerance or celiac disease, which they may believe to be an allergic reaction to certain foods. The study, which was done at Children’s Hospital of Chicago and Northwestern University, was based on a nationally representative survey of over 40,443 adults. According to the study results, 19 percent of adults think they are currently food allergic, although their reported symptoms are...
  7. The fungal disease that contaminated corn in Ohio and across the Corn Belt in 2018 can survive through the winter, so it could impact next year's crop.  (Photo: CFAES)

    Extensive Spread of Corn Toxin Could Affect 2019 Crop

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—A wetter than normal summer and fall in Ohio led to the worst spread of a toxin on corn in at least a decade, according to a grain disease expert with The Ohio State University. And next year’s crop may be at risk as well. The fungus that produces the toxin can survive the winter, particularly if stalks or other plant material from the 2018 corn crop are left on the surface of the soil, said Pierce Paul, an Ohio State University Extension specialist in corn and small grain diseases. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The extent of vomitoxin across Ohio and the rest of the Corn Belt led some farmers to receive a lower price for their crop, Paul said. High moisture levels spur the...
  8. Ohio Maple Days are coming, a chance to prep for syrup season

    WOOSTER, Ohio—What will Ohio’s recent weather—wet last year, warmish this winter—mean for the coming maple syrup season? It’s one of the topics at this year’s Ohio Maple Days program, an educational event for syrup producers set for three dates in three locations: Jan. 17 in Fulton, Jan. 18 in Fredericksburg, and Jan. 19 in Middlefield. The program will be the same at all three locations. Last year, Ohio ranked eighth nationally in maple syrup production, with a reported yield of 90,000 gallons, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Weather effects, new maple science Featured speaker Tim Perkins, director of the University of Vermont’s Proctor Maple Research Center, will...
  9. News tips and events for the week of Jan. 7

    Tip 1: Hoppy Together: Ohio’s hop industry is growing by leaps and bounds—the crop goes to make craft beer—and this week many of its members are meeting in Columbus. The Ohio Hop Conference (go.osu.edu/Ch5G), set for Jan. 9–10, will have sessions on topics such as maximizing yields, managing pests and diseases, sensory traits, harvesting, and drying. The event’s co-sponsors are the Ohio Hop Growers Guild; Ohio Farm Bureau; and The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Media members can learn more about the conference, Ohio’s hop industry, and CFAES’ research in support of the industry by talking with Brad Bergefurd, horticulture specialist at The Ohio State University South Centers in Piketon....
  10. (Photo: CFAES)

    New Chair to Lead Plant Pathology at Ohio State

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) has appointed a professor with additional experience leading a local government as the new chair of the Department of Plant Pathology. Along with an extensive academic career, Tom Mitchell, a professor of fungal biology and molecular genetics in the department, led and served on the board of trustees of Liberty Township in Delaware County, north of Ohio State’s Columbus campus. In that role, Mitchell served a population of nearly 20,000 residents, managed a budget of over $11 million, oversaw 72 employees, and led negotiations on union contracts. “The experiences I had as a township trustee are far different than any I would normally encounter as an...

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