News Releases

  1. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Chow Line: FDA Says Avoid Highly Concentrated and Pure Caffeine Products

    My roommate wants to take this caffeine powder he found online so that he can stay up late to study for his midterm exams. I’ve told him that’s not a good idea. Am I right? Yes, you’re right. In fact, the U. S. Food and Drug Administration announced last Friday that highly concentrated and pure caffeine products are illegal when sold in bulk quantities directly to consumers. The federal agency is now working to get them off of the market and is warning consumers to not use the products, which are often sold as dietary supplements. Many of the highly concentrated and pure caffeine products are currently sold online, FDA said. “Products consisting of or containing only pure or highly concentrated caffeine have been linked to at least two deaths in the...
  2. This year is the fourth consecutive year of low milk prices. (Photo: Thinkstock)

    Low Milk Prices Sending Some Dairy Farmers Out of Business

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Nervous about the dramatic drop in milk prices, Ohio’s dairy farmers are leaving the business at a higher than usual rate. Every year, some farmers retire and give up their dairy licenses, but there’s been an uptick recently. In March 2018, there were 2,253 licensed dairy farms in Ohio – a drop of 59 farms in five months. “Farmers are deciding they can no longer dig any deeper into their equity to pay for what I call ‘the privilege of milking cows,’ ” said Dianne Shoemaker, Ohio State University Extension field specialist in dairy production economics. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Profits for milk are low...
  3. Inexpensive engineering consulting is now available to manufacturing companies in central and southeastern Ohio through a new partnership between CFAES and Ohio State's College of Engineering. (Photo: College of Engineering)

    Helping Ohio's Manufacturers Grow

    PIKETON, Ohio — Manufacturing companies in central and southeastern Ohio can now take advantage of a new partnership offering engineering know-how from The Ohio State University. The College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), which staffs programs to assist businesses at its Piketon facility, now has a new partnership with Ohio State’s College of Engineering. The connection allows manufacturing companies in 37 counties in central and southeastern Ohio to tap into the engineering college’s expertise. The goal of the Ohio Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) is to help maintain and potentially increase manufacturing jobs in the state, which is particularly important in southern and southeastern Ohio. Through this new arrangement,...
  4. (Photo: Thinkstock)

    News Tips and Events for the Week of April 16

    Zombie Raccoons: Strange-acting so-called “zombie” raccoons are being reported in parts of the United States, including now in Youngstown. The animals apparently are sick with distemper. Stan Gehrt of The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences can speak on the subjects of raccoons specifically and urban wildlife issues in general. Gehrt, gehrt.1@osu.edu, 614-292-1930, is a professor and wildlife specialist who does research on, among other things, raccoons in cities. He was a featured expert on the 2012 PBS Nature film “Raccoon Nation.” Renewable Energy – Given the negative environmental consequences of generating electricity for homes and businesses from fossil fuels, such as coal and natural gas, renewable...
  5. Photo: Thinkstock.

    Chow Line: Spring Cleaning Checklist Should Include Your Fridge and Pantry, Too

    I’ve noticed that sometimes, my refrigerator has a stale odor. How can I determine what’s causing the smell, and most importantly, how can I stop the problem from occurring? It’s likely that what you are smelling is either bacteria or mold that can thrive in moist conditions and are oftentimes found in refrigerators. Moist conditions in a fridge can be caused by condensation from the fridge, humidity from the outside and, yes, spilled foods, experts say. The issue is that once moisture gets into your refrigerator, microbes can multiply and eventually emit a foul smell. There are several ways to deal with the issue, and with spring weather finally starting to occur, now is a good time to do so. When you plan your spring-cleaning regimen this season, including...
  6. Faster growing yellow perch are one of the outcomes of research done at The Ohio State University’s Ohio Center for Aquaculture Research and Development. (Photo: Ken Chamberlain, CFAES.)

    Breeding for Faster-Growing Bluegills and Yellow Perch

    PIKETON, Ohio — Inside cool water-filled tanks in southern Ohio, the laws of nature are being defied: Female yellow perch mate with other female yellow perch; male bluegills with other male bluegills. This might make you wonder, unless, of course, your profession is selective breeding of fish, and your goal is to get them to grow faster. Hanping Wang, who manages The Ohio State University’s Ohio Center for Aquaculture Research and Development, has succeeded in raising faster-growing fish by artificially mating them in a not so typical way. On average, the resulting offspring reach market size six months faster than bluegills or yellow perch bred out of standard male-female mating. That’s because among yellow perch, females grow quicker than males; among bluegills,...
  7. Bugged by Bugs in Your Home This Winter? Take Steps in Spring and Summer

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — If you spent the winter finding multicolored Asian lady beetles on your lampshades, brown marmorated stink bugs on your toaster, there’s bad news and good news. The bad news, say experts at The Ohio State University, is that Ohio’s colder than normal winter probably didn’t faze the creatures. When the winds blew, snow flew and temperatures fell below zero, they were mostly snug in your attic or walls, sheltered from the storm. That’s why they sneaked in to begin with. The good news is, with warm weather coming, they’ll be leaving your house to go back outside, and you can take steps to keep them out for good. “Spring and summer are a good time to bug-proof your home,” said Joe Boggs, entomologist and educator with...
  8. News Tips and Events for the Week of April 9

    Dealing with Lady Beetles, Stink Bugs: Two types of bugs that may have spent winter in your home (to your chagrin), multicolored Asian lady beetles and brown marmorated stink bugs, get active and try to go back outside when temperatures start to warm up in spring. Joe Boggs, an entomologist with The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), can answer questions about both insects and has tips for homeowners on how to keep them out for good. He says the time to act is soon. boggs.47@osu.edu, 513-260-1474. April 2018 events 14 Guided Bird Walk, 9-11 a.m., Seaman Orientation Plaza, Secrest Arboretum, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., CFAES’s Wooster campus. Free. Details: go.osu....
  9. Mitragyna speciosa (kratom) leaves, in powder form, capsules and tablets. Photo: Thinkstock

    Chow Line: FDA Recalls Kratom Due to Salmonella Fears

    I just heard that the FDA recalled something called kratom, but I’m not sure what it is. Is it some kind of food, and why has it been recalled? Mitragyna speciosa, which is commonly known as kratom, is a leafy tree that grows naturally in Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Its leaves are typically processed into a powder form, which is encapsulated and is sold by some companies as a dietary supplement. Because it can be ingested, kratom is categorized as a food product and falls under the oversight of the FDA. The FDA this week used its recall authority to force a Nevada-based company that sells kratom-based products to pull them off the market after several of its products tested positive for Salmonella....
  10. Photo: Thinkstock.

    April 25 Forum to Focus on Increasing Ohio Farm to School Opportunities

    CINCINNATI – The goal is simple: to get more local foods to more Ohio students in more Ohio schools. The question of how to do so is slightly more complicated. Experts with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) at The Ohio State University, in partnership with Ohio State’s Initiative for Food and AgriCultural Transformation (InFACT), will host a preconference policy forum to discuss the issue in advance of the upcoming National Farm to Cafeteria conference April 25-27 at the Duke Energy Convention Center, 525 Elm St., in Cincinnati. The Ohio Farm to Cafeteria Pre-Conference and Policy Forum is April 25 from 3-8 p.m. at the convention center and will provide an opportunity for Ohio’s Farm to School stakeholders to discuss...

Pages