News Releases

  1. (Photo: Getty Images)

    More and more viruses ‘spilling over’

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Viruses have been increasingly shifting from animals to people, a recent trend that has researchers at The Ohio State University closely studying a pig virus that can survive in human cells. The rise in viruses jumping to other species, so-called “spillover” events, is spurred by people, particularly in the developing world, cultivating land that was once isolated forests. In clearing those areas, people are exposing themselves to the viruses of wild animals that once lived secluded in those forests, said Scott Kenney, an assistant professor of veterinary preventative medicine at the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Kenney’s research focuses on viruses that spread between animals and people. Exotic live...
  2. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Takeout food and food delivery services amid COVID-19

    What steps do I need to take when ordering takeout food or food from a delivery service in light of the coronavirus pandemic? First, it’s important to understand that COVID-19 is not a foodborne disease. While there have been no reports as of this time to suggest that COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus, has been transmitted by handling food or food packaging, here are some ways that you can protect yourselves and others when ordering food through takeout, a drive-thru, or a home delivery service. Because COVID-19 transmits person-to-person through droplets that are produced when an infected individual coughs or sneezes, the best way to protect yourself and others is to keep physical distance of at least 6 feet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and...
  3. 2020 Alumni Awards Winners

    12 recognized at the 2020 CFAES Alumni Awards luncheon

    COLUMBUS—The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) congratulates its 2020 Alumni Awards recipients. “We are all inspired by the accomplishments of these individuals,” Vice President for Agricultural Administration and Dean Cathann A. Kress told 140 alumni, relatives, faculty, staff, and friends during an awards luncheon hosted by CFAES on March 7. In all, 12 individuals were recognized during the annual event, held at the Fawcett Center on the Ohio State campus: Meritorious Service Award Jerry Bigham, PhD (Professor Emeritus), Hilliard, Ohio William Hildebolt (BS, Food Technology Agriculture; MS and PhD, Horticulture), Winston-Salem, N.C. Distinguished Alumni Award Jeffrey Dickinson (...
  4. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Solar development expanding in rural Ohio

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Despite what you might think in the winter or even early spring, Ohio gets enough sunshine year-round to fuel solar energy facilities—massive ones. The smallest solar energy project being planned in the state is 610 acres, and the largest is more than five times bigger, a facility slated to stretch across nearly 3,300 acres —over 5 square miles—in Hardin County. “We’re not talking about a few panels here and there,” said Peggy Hall, agricultural and resource law field specialist for The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). In total, the 12 solar energy facilities being built or in the planning stages will cover about 16,000 acres—primarily in southern Ohio (Brown,...
  5. The CDC says wash and sanitize your hands after grocery shopping. It’s important that you wash your hands with soap for at least 20 seconds each time. Hand sanitizer is also an option if you do not have access to soap and water. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Grocery shopping in the midst of COVID-19

    What steps do I need to take when grocery shopping in light of the coronavirus pandemic? COVID-19 is not a foodborne disease. While there have been no reports as of this time to suggest that COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus, has been transmitted by handling food or food packaging, here are ways that consumers can protect themselves when grocery shopping. COVID-19 transmits person-to-person through droplets that are produced when an infected individual coughs or sneezes, said Qiuhong Wang, a scientist and coronavirus researcher with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Common symptoms of COVID-19 include fever, coughing, shortness of breath, and breathing difficulties. Symptoms range from mild to severe...
  6. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Are animals vulnerable to COVID-19?

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—While there’s no evidence so far that pets, livestock, or their owners can infect each other with COVID-19, there’s also very little research about a potential crossover. The novel coronavirus started with an animal, then mutated to transfer to people, but research hasn’t yet shown if the virus has jumped back to animals, said Scott Kenney, a researcher at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). “Viruses are constantly sampling and evolving, trying to find other hosts,” said Kenney, who studies coronaviruses, including those that cross over from one species to another. Quickly spreading among people across the world, COVID-19 is believed to have originated in bats, but the bat...
  7. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Mud and more mud

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Rain creates mud, and mud creates angst for farmers kept from doing what they value most: getting out in the fields. 2019 ended what was the wettest decade in Ohio on record. This winter has not been as wet as the last one, but it has been warmer, so the ground has not frozen for long, leaving fields saturated. And this spring is projected to bring above-average rainfall to Ohio, which will bring on more mud. And mud is not simply a gooey mess for the animals and people who trudge through it. Mud can keep farmers from planting and harvesting, lower crop yields, put livestock at higher risk for some diseases, and make it tougher for livestock to gain weight. Drive on wet soil with heavy equipment such as a planter or harvester and the pore space between the...
  8. Script Ohio on the basketball court

    OSU Extension Announces Agriculture and Natural Resources Madness: A Tournament of Education

    Columbus, Ohio—Did your usual conference get canceled? Looking to fill the void of the big basketball tournament? Ohio State University Extension is here to help with a new virtual education program for the agricultural community. “Agriculture and Natural Resources Madness: A Tournament of Education” will include 64 educational events broken into daily brackets. Each day, a virtual educational session will be held at 9 a.m., noon, and 3 p.m. The educational tournament is free of charge and will likely continue until mid-May. “This effort is a direct response to providing a variety of useful and timely sessions for farmers and families across the state during Gov. DeWine’s stay-at-home order,” said Jacqueline Wilkins, interim director of OSU...
  9. Distinguished Seniors from Dept of Animal Science

    Ohio State CFAES names 2020 Distinguished Seniors

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Twenty-five students have been named 2020 Distinguished Seniors at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The award honors top graduating seniors on the Ohio State Columbus campus who exemplify the CFAES mission in areas such as academics and scholarship, research and innovation, service and involvement, and influence and leadership. “The Distinguished Senior Award is the most prestigious undergraduate award in CFAES,” said Steven Neal, CFAES professor and associate dean for academic programs. “Recipients are our future innovators and leaders who have already made an impact within the academic environment at this university and beyond.” Listed below are the Distinguished Seniors,...
  10. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Healthy eating when stressed

    My kids are out of school for several weeks now, as part of my state’s efforts to lessen the spread of coronavirus. As a result, I’m stressed, the kids are stressed, and I’ve found myself reaching for rich, high-sugar foods that I typically avoid because they’re not the healthiest options. Any tips on how I can eat better during this time of high stress? You’re not alone. People often reach for comfort foods during times of high stress. Many times, those foods tend to be high in sugar and low in fiber. It’s best to avoid those foods because they can increase the development of chronic inflammation in our bodies, according to Patricia Brinkman, family and consumer sciences educator with Ohio State University Extension. That’s an issue...

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