News Releases

  1. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Improperly cooked hamburgers on the grill could make your Memorial Day memorable

    We plan to grill this weekend for Memorial Day but my husband and I can’t seem to agree on how to cook the hamburgers. I like them medium rare like a steak, but my husband says the burgers should be cooked until they are well done. Which one of us is right? Unlike steaks, hamburgers, and any ground beef meals, should be cooked until they reach an internal temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit to help lessen your chance of developing a foodborne illness, said Sanja Ilic, the state food safety specialist for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  Even though beef steak and ground beef are both beef, steak can be safe to eat at a minimum internal...
  2. Photo: Getty Images

    Media Advisory: Ohio State expert available to speak about relationship between cancer and diet

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—An expert in nutrition and how foods play a role in disease prevention from The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) is available to discuss with the media about the relationship between cancer and diet in light of the recently released study on the issue. A study published May 22 in the JNCI Cancer Spectrum found that an estimated 80,110 new cancer cases among adults 20 and older in the United States in 2015 were associated with eating a poor diet. The study evaluated seven dietary factors: a low intake of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and dairy products; and a high intake of processed meats, red meats, and sugary beverages such as soda. The study also found that low whole-grain consumption...
  3. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Reviving your lawn after winter’s freeze and thaw

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—If your lawn is more brown than green or dense with dandelions, you can probably blame Mother Nature. Those shifts in temperature we appreciated in Ohio last winter, moving from freezing to above freezing and back and forth, have taken a toll on lawns across the state. As the underground moisture froze and thawed repeatedly, the water in the soil expanded and contracted, and that could have pushed up roots, exposing them and possibly killing them, said Todd Hicks, turfgrass pathology program coordinator with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). “Some peoples’ lawns look like they were seeded with dandelions,” Hicks said. Other lawns came out of winter with many bare patches of soil,...
  4.  The latest round in the trade war between the United States and China has resulted in higher tariffs Americans will pay for goods from China. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Tariffs leading to ‘point of no return’

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Even if the United States eventually reaches a trade agreement with China, the damage done from the ongoing trade war could take years to undo, according to an agricultural economist with The Ohio State University. It took a while to build a Chinese market for U.S. products, including American soybeans, and it will likely take considerable time to rebuild that market, said Ian Sheldon, a professor with Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). “Trade negotiations don’t get resolved in months; they take years. It’s not simple. These are the two largest economies in the world, essentially mud wrestling. I think we’ve reached the point of no return,” said Sheldon, who serves as the Andersons...
  5. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Making it more viable to turn agricultural waste into renewable fuel

    WOOSTER, Ohio—Although the stalks and leaves of a corn plant can be turned into ethanol, the high cost of collecting, storing, and transporting the material has limited its use in producing the fuel. Ajay Shah, an agricultural engineer with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) is testing a method that could cut the cost of collecting and delivering corn plant material for making ethanol by up to 20%. Shah just received a $1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to test the effectiveness of a new method that harvests and transports corn plants intact, the ears together with the stalks. Shah’s strategy has the potential to spur the lagging industry of so-called cellulosic ethanol—ethanol produced...
  6. A free Fulton County Breakfast on the Farm will provide consumers a firsthand look at modern food production.

    News tips and events for the week of May 20

    Tip 1: Breakfast on the farm. Ever wondered how a dairy farm operates or where your food comes from? Breakfast on the Farm, a free event on June 15, will provide consumers a firsthand look at modern food production, said Eric Richer, an Ohio State University Extension educator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The breakfast event is from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Henricks & Krieger Dairy, 14692 County Road 16-3, in Fayette, Ohio. The event is free but requires registration. Register at go.osu.edu/fultonbotfregister2019. The event allows the community to visit local farming operations, have a close-to-home agricultural experience, and interact with farm families who provide a wholesome food...
  7. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Learning to dine with diabetes

    My dad was recently diagnosed with diabetes and was advised to change his diet. Do you know of any local resource to help us understand which diet changes he’ll need to make?   One of the best resources your dad can turn to is his doctor, who might be able to connect him with a dietitian who can possibly help him tailor an eating plan specific to his dietary needs. Additionally, your dad and the rest of your family can learn more about diabetes and how to manage nutritional needs through a free online course created by Ohio State University Extension family and consumer sciences educators. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.  The course, Dining with Diabetes:Beyond the...
  8. Rain across the state has slowed progress on planting. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Late start on planting might not hurt yields much

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Despite rain that has stalled the planting of corn and soybeans across the state, yields might not be reduced, according to two grain specialists at The Ohio State University. That’s because weather later in the growing season can have a bigger impact on yields than the date the seeds go in the ground, said Peter Thomison and Laura Lindsey, both agronomists at Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). During July and August, too much or too little rain or really hot temperatures can be detrimental because that’s when corn plants form kernels and soybean plants form beans, Thomison and Lindsey said. Only 4% of this year’s corn crop has been planted compared to 50% this time last year; 2% of the...
  9. Photo: Getty Images

    News tips and events for the week of May 13

    Tip 1: Wet weather delays Ohio planting: Persistent rain and saturated soil conditions have delayed corn and soybean planting in much of Ohio thus far this planting season. For the week ended May 5, only 2% of Ohio’s projected corn acreage was planted. In comparison, 20% was planted at that same time last year, and 27% is the five-year average for that time. Soybean planting is also down, with only 1% of Ohio’s projected soybean acreage planted. In comparison, 7% was planted at that same time last year, and 9% is the five-year average for that same time. Many farmers statewide question whether they can still produce crops with strong yields after such late planting, so agronomists at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (...
  10. Food safety experts say never wash or rinse raw chicken. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Never a good idea to wash raw poultry

    I saw a discussion on social media this week that said not to wash raw chicken before cooking it. But I always rinse mine with a mixture of lime or lemon juice and vinegar, which my mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother did as well. Why should I stop doing that now? The fact is that you shouldn’t wash or rinse raw chicken or any other raw poultry before cooking it. Period. This is because rinsing or washing raw chicken doesn’t kill any bacterial pathogens such as campylobacter, salmonella, or other bacteria that might be on the inside and outside of raw chicken. But when you wash or rinse raw chicken, you are likely splashing chicken juices that can spread those pathogens in the kitchen and contaminate other foods, utensils, and countertops, according to the...

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