News Releases

  1. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Two Cutting Boards are Better Than One

    I’m getting my own apartment soon and I’m shopping for a cutting board – should I get a wooden or plastic one? Congrats on your new home! When shopping for a new cutting board, there are many options to choose from, including wood, plastic, marble, glass or pyroceramic. While each one has its advantages and disadvantages, the easiest one to clean and keep clean, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is a cutting board that has a nonporous surface. That’s the most important thing to consider when buying and using a cutting board – how to keep it clean to decrease the risk of contamination of pathogens that can cause a foodborne illness. So when choosing a cutting board, you should look for one that is easy to clean, rinse and sanitize....
  2. Emergency Room Entrance

    Farmers Must Prepare for the Unthinkable

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Tony Nye is a man on a mission. A serious heart-related illness in late 2017 shook him to his core. It also convinced him that many farmers, both small-scale and large-scale, need to hear what he has to say. “I was as close to knocking on the Pearly Gates as possible before I turned the corner,” he recalled. After surgery, he lost both weight and strength and spent a month in the hospital. “I wasn’t able to return to the barns for almost six months.” Those barns are on his 50-acre Fayette County farm, where Nye raises meat goats and artificially breeds purebred swine. The swine herd consists of 20 sows and a boar stud that he lightheartedly refers to as “boar in a bottle.” The farm also includes some grain...
  3. OSU Extension's AgrAbility program helps farmers get assistive technology they might need to keep farming. (Photo: Ken Chamberlain, CFAES)

    Continuing to Farm Despite Injuries and Aging

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — As you get older, it can be tougher to hop on or off a tractor or withstand the constant bumps that come with driving over uneven turf. Done over and over, twisting, lifting, bending, kneeling, it can all become challenging. Young farmers doing repetitive tasks might also feel the toll. “No matter what your age, farming is hard work, and it can hurt. If you’re a little older, it can really hurt,” said Laura Akgerman, disability services coordinator for Ohio State University Extension’s Ohio AgrAbility program. The program is part of a national effort through the U.S. Department of Agriculture that promotes independence for people working in agriculture who want to continue farming after experiencing a disabling condition. Ohio...
  4. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Tips and Events for the Week of Aug. 13

    Tip 1: Pumpkins On the Way: Though we’re a few months away from pumpkin-carving time, pumpkin plants are blooming large, orange-colored flowers, that, after pollination can turn into pumpkins. Growers interested in learning about managing diseases, weeds and insects as well as about the latest technology for growing pumpkins can attend the Aug. 23 Pumpkin Field Night at the Western Agricultural Research Station, 7721 S. Charleston Pike, in South Charleston. Media members are also welcome to attend the event. For more information, contact Jim Jasinski at 937-462-8016 or jasinski.4@osu.edu. Register by August 20 at surveymonkey.com/r/pumpkinreg18 or 937-462-8016. Tip 2: Longtime 4-H Volunteer Continues to Give: Pat Brundige has given the largest donation in the history of the...
  5. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Back-to-School? Food Safety Tips for Packed Lunches

    My kids are starting back to school next week, and this year they are packing their lunch for the first time. Any tips on what I need to do to make sure their packed lunch is safe and healthy? Wow – is it that time of year already? If your child wants to bring a packed lunch to school, there are several ways to make sure their lunch is both healthy and safe from pathogens that could cause a foodborne illness. This is an important distinction to make, as children are among the most vulnerable to food poisoning. That’s partly due to the fact that their immune systems are not as effective at fighting off bacteria and viruses compared to those of adults, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. When packing a lunch for your child to take to school, it’...
  6. 2 Green Places to Visit When You Go to Farm Science Review

    LONDON, Ohio — Farm Science Review, the major agricultural trade show set for Sept. 18-20 in London, will share what’s new with trees, fish, wildlife, pastures, ponds and gardening, too. How-to talks scheduled for the Review’s Gwynne Conservation Area and Utzinger Memorial Garden will cover a gamut of green things, from backyard gardening to home landscaping, managing woods to grazing grass, bringing in birds to planting for bees. You’ll find flower gardens, prairie plantings and experts on hand who can answer your questions. Together, the Gwynne and Utzinger sites “help provide a well-rounded experience” at Farm Science Review, said Nick Zachrich, who manages the event. Learning more about natural resources,...
  7. Tips and Events for the Week of Aug. 6

    Tip 1: Growing hops: As craft beer brewing grows in Ohio, so does the growing of hops, a key ingredient in that beer. In August, the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) at The Ohio State University is hosting three Hops Field Nights for new and experienced growers. The events will feature talks by CFAES scientists, tours of hop fields, and demonstrations of practices and equipment. The dates are Aug. 8 in Piketon, Aug. 15 in Bowling Green and Aug. 23 in Wooster. CFAES Horticulture Specialist Brad Bergefurd, who does research on growing hops in Ohio and is education advisor for the Ohio Hop Growers Guild, will be the host of all three events. Media members are welcome to attend any of the three. Contact Charissa Gardner at gardner.1148...
  8. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Simple Suppers Make Mealtimes Fun and Easy for Families, Kids

    I’m a mom of twin preschoolers and want to make sure that I teach them healthy eating habits at an early age. How I can do that and stay within a modest food budget? It’s wonderful that you want to establish healthy eating habits in your children starting when they are young. Research has shown that ensuring good nutritional habits, particularly early on, can help prevent childhood obesity and other chronic diseases. In addition to having a healthy weight, establishing healthy eating habits in children can help them have more energy and happier moods, and also can help them have those habits for the rest of their lives, experts say. One way to help instill better eating habits in your children is to take advantage of great programs out there like Simple Suppers....
  9. Jerry Ardrey  (left) and Clayton W. Rose III (right) will be inducted into the 29th class of honorees for the Farm Science Review's Hall of Fame.

    Farm Science Review Inducts Two More Into Hall of Fame

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — The Farm Science Review will induct Clayton W. Rose III and Jerry Ardrey into the 29th class of honorees for the Review’s Hall of Fame, an honor held by 76 others for their contribution to the event. The Farm Science Review, which will take place this year from Sept. 18-20 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center near London, Ohio, offers farmers and other visitors the opportunity to learn about the latest agricultural innovations from experts from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) at The Ohio State University. Jerry Ardrey Ardrey is a native of London who has been in the automotive sales industry his entire life. He worked for his family business as a vehicle dealer and continued with the industry for his career...
  10. Outbreaks of Japanese beetles occurred in various parts of Ohio this summer, according to an OSU Extension entomologist. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Surge in Japanese Beetles to Dissipate

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Those uninvited summer guests that ate much more than expected are on their way out. It’s not unusual to spot Japanese beetles in June and July, but the number of them was much higher this summer with outbreaks in Cincinnati, Dayton and Columbus as well as in northeast Ohio, said Joe Boggs, an entomologist with Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) at The Ohio State University. Though Japanese beetles typically thrive on the leaves of linden trees, grape vines and roses, this summer, they branched out, devouring other plants in Ohio including scotch pine and jewelweed.   “Sometimes during outbreaks, they’ll feed on strange things,...

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