News Releases

  1. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: When to throw out moldy food

    When is it ok to consume food that mold has grown on, and when should one throw the food away? That depends, in part, on the type of food. First, it’s important to understand what mold is.  Mold and yeast are generally considered spoilage organisms, as they cause undesirable changes to the appearance, texture, smell, and taste of the product, explains Abigail Snyder, an assistant professor and food safety field specialist for The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). However, some instances of mold growth on food introduces food safety concerns, Snyder wrote in Mold Has Grown on Your Food: What Should You Do, a recent Ohioline fact sheet. Ohioline is Ohio State University Extension’s free online...
  2. News tips and events for the week of April 1

    Tip 1: Federal Farm Bill Explained: The $426 billion federal farm bill Congress passed in December has some changes in it that farmers and others would benefit from knowing about. On April 11, The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and partners are hosting a Farm Bill Summit in Versailles, Ohio, to address those changes and what they may mean for the state’s farmers and producers. Speakers will address government assistance paid or partially paid for in the farm bill including crop insurance; compensation for farmers who set aside a portion of their land for conservation; and payments to farmers who grow corn, soybeans, wheat, and other commodities when losses occur due to low commodities prices or low revenue...
  3. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: New tool offers chefs guidance on food safety

    As a food blogger, I’ve written my own recipes before, but I’m wondering how I can incorporate the most updated food safety information into those recipes. Do you have any advice for me? A new online tool that was launched this month will allow people who develop and write recipes to incorporate step-by-step food safety information into those recipes.  The Safe Recipe Style Guide was developed by food safety experts and food journalists as part of an effort to help educate consumers on safe food-handling practices. The free online tool, which is offered by the Partnership for Food Safety Education, a Virginia-based nonprofit food safety organization, provides recipe writers information about how to incorporate food tips into most recipes. The...
  4. Photo: Getty Images

    News tips and events for the week of March 25

    Tip 1: “Zombie” deer meat? A recent Chow Line column answers a question on chronic wasting disease, which has also been called “zombie deer disease.” This disease rots the brains of deer, elk, and moose, causing them to act lethargic and less afraid of humans before dying, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As such, the CDC advises people to take certain precautions when dealing with deer or elk and the meat from those animals in areas where chronic wasting disease is confirmed within the wild herd. While Ohio’s current status designation is “chronic wasting disease-free in the wild,” there have been some reported cases in three surrounding states: Michigan, West Virginia, and...
  5. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Considering a gluten-free diet?

    I am thinking about removing gluten from my diet. Is there anything that I need to consider before making that decision? Yes. An important thing to consider before going gluten free is the question of why you want to make that change. Gluten is a protein that is found in wheat, barley, and rye. It also appears in many processed foods. There is often a medical reason—such as wheat allergy, celiac disease, or non-celiac gluten sensitivity—why a person must follow a gluten-free diet, said Shannon Carter, educator, family and consumer sciences, Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. However, some people have adopted a gluten-free diet because they...
  6. Waterman Agricultural and Natural Resources Laboratory. Photo: CFAES

    Nationwide Foundation approves $7M grant in support of Ohio State partnership to support facilities, programming in College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Building on 50 years of partnership with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), the Nationwide Foundation is contributing $7 million to support the college’s vision of a modern land-grant institution with a mission to sustain life. “The Nationwide Foundation is proud to make this contribution to Ohio State and see our collaborative efforts around food production, security, and sustainability take a giant leap forward,” said Nationwide Foundation President Chad Jester. “Together, we share a long-term vision with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences that assures the land-grant mission of sustaining life remains strong for generations to come.” The...
  7. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Farm income projections hold a bit of good news

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Corn prices are on the rise, while soybean prices are projected to continue to dip this year before recovering a bit in 2020, according to government projections. And this year, national net farm income, which takes into account many commodities not grown in Ohio, is projected to increase 10 percent over last year’s total, forecasts from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) show. “These are not the best of times, but it’s stable,” said Ani Katchova, associate professor and chair of the farm income enhancement program at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Low commodity prices can put financial stress on growers, but the bankruptcy and loan delinquency rates, indicators of...
  8. Photo of The Ohio State University's Buckeye Grove

    News tips and events for the week of March 18

    News Tip 1: Tree Campuses: The Columbus campus of The Ohio State University and the Wooster campus of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) have each been named a Tree Campus USA by the Arbor Day Foundation. The annual designation goes to colleges and universities for their commitment to effective urban forest management—for doing the work to have healthy trees where it’s sometimes a challenge to grow them—and on both campuses, CFAES experts play a big role in efforts to earn the honor. Learn more in a March 15 story the CFAES Stories website, “CFAES loves its buckeyes, and also all their friends,” at go.osu.edu/Cr7n. For details on the Columbus campus effort, contact Mary Maloney, director of CFAES...
  9. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Everything you need to know about the farm bill in one summit

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Profits for Ohio corn and soybean farmers are not likely to be as high as they were in 2018 when growers benefited from above normal yields and new government aid, according to an agricultural economics expert at The Ohio State University. At least two factors could be different this year: Yields in 2018 were record high for corn and soybeans, which may not happen again in 2019, and the government payments that farmers received to compensate for the impact of foreign tariffs may not be reissued, said Ben Brown, manager of the farm management program in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) at The Ohio State University. “We’re expecting Ohio corn and soybean farmers, on average, to either break even or experience losses...
  10. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Farmers need to gear up for more rain

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Weather extremes like those during 2018, much more rain, and heavier downpours are likely to become the norm rather than the exception in Ohio, according to a climate expert with The Ohio State University. As a result, the state's farmers will have to deal with more and more water pouring onto and running off of their fields, and that could threaten the quality of water downstream, said Aaron Wilson, climate specialist with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Last year was the third wettest year ever in Ohio. Temperatures have been getting warmer across the Midwest, with the coldest temperature in the year now up 3 degrees from what it was in the first half of the 20th century, Wilson said. Warmer temperatures have led to a...

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