News Releases

  1. Photo: Getty Images

    Holiday baking? The CDC says don’t eat the raw dough

    Is it safe to lick the bowl when making cakes or cookies? No, it’s not. While it’s that time of year when holiday cookies reign supreme, it’s also a good time of year to warn folks against eating foods with raw eggs for fear of contracting salmonella or other foodborne illnesses. Raw flour is also not safe to eat, because it too can cause a mean case of foodborne illness, said Shari Gallup, family and consumer sciences educator for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Although many people might love the taste of raw cookie dough or raw cake or brownie batter, eating it can make you sick. Raw or undercooked eggs can cause salmonella...
  2. New science building on the CFAES Wooster campus

    CFAES Wooster new umbrella term for Ohio State location

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Wooster, Ohio has long played an important role for The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Two of its major components, the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), and the two-year associate degree-granting program, the Agricultural Technical Institute (ATI), got their start there in 1892 and 1968, respectively. While in past years, the research and student pieces have operated separately, new changes are afoot to unify the campus. A first step in ensuring this evolution is a name change to CFAES Wooster. Changing the name of the campus will also produce shared resources, infrastructure, personnel, and equipment. “It allows us to think about this location as a full campus,...
  3. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Healthy ways to improve immunity

    As we go into the winter months and illness chances increase, what can I do to boost my immune system? Your question is on the minds of many consumers, as more people have been reaching for vitamin supplements and seeking out healthy foods to improve their immune system amid the COVID-19 pandemic. In fact, 77% of consumers say they want to eat healthier to boost their immunity during the pandemic, according to a study by Archer Daniels Midland, a Chicago-based, food-processing company. Building and maintaining a healthy immune system starts with focusing on good nutrition, said Beth Stefura, a family and consumer sciences educator for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental...
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    Dreading winter? Try to lighten up

    Another Ohio winter is upon us.  The extra hours of darkness or slate-gray skies can easily drag down a mood already challenged by the pandemic. We’re socializing less often, hunkering down, and shelving vacation plans to warmer and brighter tropical spots. Meanwhile, we have to tackle what seems like an endless string of Zoom meetings while trying to edge our kids into get-it-done mode, and at the end of the day, confront the same hurdle: What’s for dinner? So how do we keep pandemic exhaustion from descending into depression? David Wirt, a counselor with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), has some advice on how to lighten your mood in the coldest months of the year. Get out in the sunlight every...
  5. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Holidays and diabetes management

    My husband has diabetes and we’re not sure what that means for him with all the holiday meals and celebrations we’re anticipating this month. Do you have any tips on how he can manage his diabetes through the holidays? With some 34.2 million Americans who have diabetes and some 88 million who have prediabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, having an understanding of how to manage the disease is key to healthy living for millions of people nationwide. And the holidays can present additional challenges for those who live with diabetes, particularly as people look for ways to either avoid temptation or make better choices while they navigate all the indulgences of the season, said Jenny Lobb, a family and consumer sciences educator for Ohio...
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    Turning a weed into a profit-yielding crop

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—People who garden may know about pennycress.  It’s also called “stinkweed” for the odor it gives off when it’s crushed. Unlike most weeds, pennycress seeds contain a lot of oil, and that oil can be turned into fuel for jets or diesel trucks and cars.  Two researchers at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) just began a study to create the most resilient, high-yielding varieties of pennycress for farmers to grow.  Planted in late fall and harvested in spring, pennycress could offer dual benefits to farmers. It could protect their fields from erosion in fall and winter. And it could lead to extra money in spring when harvested and sold. “It’s...
  7. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Storing small holiday meals safely

    Due to COVID-19 restrictions, we plan to host only our immediate family for Thanksgiving this year, but I still anticipate having leftovers. How long after Thursday can we safely eat the leftovers? As COVID-19 safety restrictions tighten across the country, many families are changing their usual Thanksgiving plans, with many planning to put precautions in place at holiday gatherings such as social distancing and asking those with COVID-19 symptoms not to attend, according to a nationwide survey from The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. The survey found that 79% of respondents say they plan to celebrate only with household members, 73% plan to follow social distancing measures, 67% plan to wear masks, and 62% plan to celebrate with no more than 10 people in...
  8. Dean Cathann Kress

    CFAES dean reappointed to Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board

    COLUMBUS—Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine has reappointed Cathann A. Kress, vice president of agricultural administration and dean of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) at The Ohio State University, to the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board. Kress began her first term on the board in 2017. Her new term began on July 31, 2020, and will end on Jan. 25, 2023. “Within the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, we take our land-grant mission seriously and seek to connect our science to issues impacting Ohioans,” said Kress. “I am honored to be reappointed to a board that has a critical role in protecting the welfare of livestock raised in Ohio, and balances scientific knowledge with professional experience and ethical...
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    Keeping a lid on Ohio’s newest pest: the spotted lanternfly

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—A group of spotted lanternflies, which feed on grapevines, hops, and fruit trees, was recently discovered in Ohio, triggering concerns the pest could become established and spread quickly. In October, adult lanternflies were found outside a business in Jefferson County, adjacent to the Pennsylvania border. Adult lanternflies won’t be seen during the winter months because they die off as temperatures drop below freezing. But before dying, the females typically lay 30–50 eggs, and come spring, their offspring could begin feeding. “If there’s anything I’m personally losing sleep over, it’s this insect,” said Maria Smith, outreach specialist in grape production at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural,...
  10. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: How to thaw a frozen turkey safely

    I’m making a turkey for the first time because, this year, we’re staying home for Thanksgiving and avoiding our traditional large holiday gathering due to the pandemic. However, as a novice, I’m not sure how to thaw the turkey. What do I do? Good question! It’s very important that you thaw and cook your turkey safely to help avoid developing foodborne illnesses. Thawing a frozen turkey correctly helps minimize the growth of bacteria, which can cause foodborne illnesses. While frozen, a turkey is safe indefinitely. However, as soon as it begins to thaw, any bacteria that might have been present before freezing can begin to grow again, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service. There are three safe ways to thaw a...

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