News Releases

  1. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Black licorice warnings and tips for safe Halloween celebrations

    Can eating too much black licorice really cause heart problems? In some cases, for some people, yes. With Halloween this week and candy sales expected to top $3.1 billion this year, according to the National Retail Federation, it’s a good time to revisit the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s warning regarding black licorice. The FDA warns that people over 40 who eat 2 ounces of black licorice a day for at least two weeks could experience an irregular heart rhythm or arrhythmia that could land them in the hospital. Black licorice can also interact with some medications, herbs, and dietary supplements, FDA says. This is significant, considering that two-thirds of parents report that they do eat some of their children’s Halloween candy haul, according to...
  2. CFAES celebrates opening of one-of-a-kind greenhouse of the future

    The Ohio State University President Kristina M. Johnson, the Ohio State Board of Trustees, and several elected officials joined Cathann A. Kress, Ohio State vice president for agricultural administration and dean of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), in celebrating the completion of a new, state-of-the-art greenhouse research complex that will catapult the university, the state of Ohio, and all of North America to the forefront of controlled environment agriculture (CEA), an innovative, technology-based approach to farming that takes place inside a facility equipped to create the most optimal conditions for food production. The Controlled Environment Agriculture Research Complex (CEARC) uses emerging technology to conduct research and control...
  3. Linda Saif

    Pandemic prep needs ‘smart surveillance’ to predict viral spillovers

    COLUMBUS, Ohio–“Smart surveillance” for viral spillover from animals to humans, targeted preparedness and drug and vaccine research, and worldwide cooperation on surveillance and stopping disease spread are required to reduce deaths and lessen the economic consequences of the next pandemic, according to an international team of scientists.  In a perspective article published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the 14 experts cite virus pandemics dating from 1918 to the COVID-19 crisis as examples of how “the world has largely failed to meet the challenge to be better prepared to prevent or respond to the next outbreak.”  Future outbreaks are inevitable. The team says the best way to lower chances for...
  4. Tomato plants in a greenhouse

    Ohio State to lead research and development project to help greenhouse growers create optimal conditions, increase crops, and reduce waste

    COLUMBUS, OHIO—The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) is leading a research and development project to help greenhouse growers create the most ideal growing environment using real-time data and climate optimization processes. The U.S. Department of Agriculture awarded a $3.77 million grant to study controlled environment agriculture (CEA), a process that extends the growing season, reduces waste, and yields more crops that are higher in quality by controlling environmental factors such as temperature, light, and nutrients. CFAES will spearhead the four-year study with collaboration from Rutgers; Cornell; University of Arizona; and Koidra, a company specializing in tools that help greenhouse and indoor growers manage crops using...
  5. Distinguished Ohio State Professor and leading soil scientist Rattan Lal earns India’s fourth highest award for groundbreaking work

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Distinguished University Professor Rattan Lal recently earned India’s prestigious Padma Shri award for his innovative research and sustainable farming practices that address food insecurity and mitigate climate change. Padma Shri is India’s fourth highest civilian honor and recognizes individuals for their distinguished service in any field. Lal was recognized in the Science and Engineering category for pioneering a method of farming called soil sequestration, a technique that restores nutrients to the soil by trapping them in the ground. Soil sequestration also prevents carbon dioxide from entering the atmosphere, which leads to reduced carbon emissions. “Dr. Lal’s work significantly impacts the future of the planet because it...
  6. OSU Extension’s Mobile Design Lab

    Grant helps 4-H expand access to computer science education to multiple counties statewide

    COLUMBUS, Ohio–Thanks to a grant from Google, at least 1,500 more Ohio youth will have increased access to computer science education offered by Ohio 4-H. The funds are part of a $5 million grant to National 4-H Council to help expand access to computer science. In Ohio, the funds will go towards offering computer science programming to an additional 1,500 youth across the state by Ohio 4-H professionals, said Kirk Bloir, state 4-H leader and assistant director, Ohio State University Extension. Ohio 4-H, the youth development arm of OSU Extension, offers 4-H programs to youth in all 88 of Ohio’s counties. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). As America’s largest youth...
  7. Jason Hartschuh

    Hartschuh named as field specialist, Dairy Management and Precision Livestock at Ohio State

    COLUMBUS, Ohio–Jason Hartschuh has been hired as field specialist, dairy management and precision livestock for Ohio State University Extension in The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Hartschuh, who previously served as an OSU Extension educator for agriculture and natural resources, will begin his new position Nov. 1, said Jacqueline Kirby Wilkins, associate dean and director, OSU Extension. “In this important position, Jason will provide leadership for developing and implementing a comprehensive Extension and applied research agenda in dairy management and precision livestock farming,” Wilkins said. Hartschuh will focus on providing unbiased research and education in precision livestock farming, dairy...
  8. Photo: Free images

    Three Extension professionals named as field specialists, Farm Management at Ohio State

    COLUMBUS, Ohio–Bruce Clevenger, David Marrison, and Eric Richer have been hired as field specialists, farm management for Ohio State University Extension in The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The three new specialists, who previously have served as OSU Extension county educators, will begin their new roles Nov. 1, said Jacqueline Kirby Wilkins, associate dean and director, OSU Extension. “Farm management is an extremely important topic in the agriculture industry, and OSU Extension has determined that the best way to address this top priority is to install several professionals to coordinate their efforts across the state,” Wilkins said. “Bruce, David, and Eric are experts in this field, and each also...
  9. Team Nationwide

    Ohio State’s Dean’s Charity Steer Show Raises $247,148

    COLUMBUS—Final donations have been tallied and an impressive $247,148 was raised by the Dean’s Charity Steer Show for Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC) of Central Ohio. Held August 2 at the Ohio State Fair’s Cooper Arena, the show far surpassed all expectations. “This wonderful event brings people together to celebrate communities, agriculture, and children,” said Cathann A. Kress, vice president for agricultural administration and dean of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) who serves as host for the event. The event is focused on youth who benefit from the Ronald McDonald House, which is the sole beneficiary of the funds, as well as the 4-H youth who provide their expertise and steers for...
  10. Farm Science Review overview shot

    Great weather, crowds make for successful 60th annual Farm Science Review

    The 60th annual Farm Science Review, sponsored by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) at The Ohio State University, came to a close yesterday at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center after welcoming 114,589 visitors during the course of the three-day event and showcasing the latest in agricultural innovations. “We’ve received great feedback in terms of the value that Farm Science Review offers to both attendees and exhibitors. It provides a venue for forging new business partnerships and the transfer of knowledge among people involved in different areas of agriculture,” said Nick Zachrich, show manager. With more than 600 exhibitors, the latest in agricultural technology, presentations by subject matter experts from Ohio State and...

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