News Releases

  1. (Photo: Getty Images)

    More diseases and lower yields forecasted for corn and soybeans

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—The late start to the planting season stunted growth in many corn and soybean fields across Ohio, and yields for both crops are expected to be the state’s smallest since 2008. Last spring’s unrelenting rain caused shallow roots to develop in both soybean and corn plants because the roots did not have to reach far down into the soil for moisture, say crop experts with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Planting in wet soils also led to soil compaction in which particles of soil became pressed together, reducing space between them and limiting the flow of water. Then summer brought little rain in much of the state, further hindering the plants’ ability to absorb water. “The issues...
  2. News tips and events for the week of Sept. 30

    Tip 1: CFAES helps veterans practice farming. Eighteen central Ohio veterans spent summer farming at the Waterman Agricultural and Natural Resources Laboratory in Columbus, part of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). As participants in a pilot project called the Veteran Farming Program—organized by the Central Ohio VA Healthcare System and CFAES’ Ohio State University Extension outreach arm—the veterans gained practice in farming and gardening while benefiting from the activities’ therapeutic aspects. “I used to farm when I was younger,” one of the participants, Vietnam veteran Bob Udeck, 74, said. “It feels really good to get your hands dirty again—planting...
  3. Venison. Photo: Getty Images.

    Chow line: Handling venison safely during harvesting and preparation key to stemming foodborne illnesses

    Hunting season starts soon, and we want to make sure we safely prepare any meat that we bag. Can you share some tips on how to do so? Deer hunting season in Ohio begins tomorrow, Sept. 28, and runs through Feb. 2, 2020. Last year, hunters in Ohio checked 172,040 white-tailed deer, and more than 250,000 white-tailed deer the prior year, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources’ Division of Wildlife.  With that in mind, it’s important that any venison derived from hunting be handled safely to avoid the spread of foodborne pathogens, which could cause foodborne illnesses. Venison is meat from wild game such as deer, elk, moose, caribou, antelope, and pronghorn.  Pathogens such as E.coli, salmonella, and toxoplasma are typically found in the...
  4. A blue dasher dragonfly.

    News tips and events for the week of Sept. 23

    Tip 1: Dragonfly migration leaving unanswered questions. MaLisa Spring, an alumna of the CFAES master’s degree program in entomology, serves as state coordinator of the Ohio Dragonfly Survey. Hordes of dragonflies have recently shown up on weather radar in the eastern United States. While there are still a lot of unanswered questions about dragonfly migrations, Spring said several species do fly south in the late summer and early fall. “This year, it seems like the numbers are much larger as a lot more people are reporting them,” she was quoted as saying in a Sept. 19 story on the CNN website. Contact Spring at spring.99@osu.edu. Tip 2: Ohio State ATI professor named National Educator of the Year. Laura Deeter, professor of horticulture technologies at Ohio State ATI...
  5. (Photo: Ken Chamberlain, CFAES)

    Farm Science Review 2019: Delayed harvest bolsters attendance

    LONDON, Ohio—Even during a challenging year for farmers, the 57th annual Farm Science Review topped recent years’ visitor totals with its first-ever career fair, more than a hundred educational talks, and new technology. This year’s late harvest boosted attendance at the farm show, which attracted 114,590 people over three days. Typically at this time of the year, many farmers are driving combines. Instead, some were eyeing brand-new combines and tractors displayed at the show, taking pictures of their children and grandchildren behind the wheel. Under sunny skies and welcoming mild temperatures, visitors learned about the economics of producing malting barley, legal issues associated with growing hemp, the most common mistakes made by family-run farms, and tactics...
  6. Vegetables rich in potassium. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Many options for potassium

    My doctor told me that I need to increase my potassium intake, but I’m not the biggest fan of bananas. How much potassium should I have daily, and what are some other foods that are good sources of it? Potassium is an essential mineral and electrolyte that people need as part of a healthy, balanced diet. Potassium is vital because it regulate your body’s fluid balance and controls the electrical activity of your heart and other muscles. It also serves several other functions in the human body. It lowers blood pressure, decreases the risk of stroke, supports bone-mineral density, protects against loss of muscle mass, and reduces the formation of kidney stones. Consuming a high-potassium diet has been linked to a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, said Pat...
  7. (Photo: Andrew Klopfenstein)

    Digital Agriculture program celebrates Ohio State’s sesquicentennial

    LONDON, Ohio—For the past 150 years, The Ohio State University has been a leader in advancements in agriculture and engineering. And now, using precision agriculture technology, Ohio State researchers are able to show how technology can be used to create an image of a logo commemorating the university’s 150th anniversary in a soybean field. This is the fifth year that Ohio State’s Digital Agriculture program has demonstrated GPS-guided “smart planting” for multiple hybrids of corn and soybeans. This year’s specially planted field takes the shape of the symbol of Ohio State’s sesquicentennial. The soybeans planted to create the logo matured faster than the brighter, greener soybeans that form the image’s background. “This being...
  8. Photo: Ken Chamberlain

    News tips and events for the week of Sept. 16

    Tip 1: Farm Science Review, the annual agricultural trade show sponsored by The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), is Sept. 17–19 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center, 135 State Route 38 NE, London, Ohio. The show offers talks, displays, field demonstrations, and hundreds of commercial exhibitors. Visitors can also attend an agriculture industry career fair, and peruse the latest in farm machinery and technology. FSR features 4,000 product lines and over 700 commercial and educational exhibits, as well as workshops and presentations delivered by CFAES experts. Expected total attendance is more than 100,000. FSR hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Sept. 17–18 and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sept. 19. Tickets for the event are $7...
  9. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Fall vegetable options plentiful

    I love to eat seasonal produce such as strawberries in the spring and sweet corn in the summer, but besides apples, I’m not sure what’s in season now. Can you tell me which fruits and vegetables are seasonal in the fall? Your question is very similar to another that was asked in a “Chow Line” column from September 2017, so it’s best answered by reissuing that column here. Fall is a good time to start looking to buy pears, apples, and hard squash, among many other seasonal fruits and vegetables. In fact, those are some of the items that many grocery stores typically start to promote heavily at discounted prices in their grocery aisles, according to the National Retail Report, a weekly roundup of advertised retail pricing information compiled by the U.S....
  10. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Hemp holds potential for Ohio farmers

    LONDON, Ohio—Ohio’s recent legalization of growing and processing hemp comes at a time when the state’s farmers might be especially interested in finding more sources of income. Though costly to grow, hemp can be profitable particularly as a source for cannabidiol (CBD) oil, an extract produced from hemp seeds and used to treat various illnesses, said Peggy Hall, agricultural and resource law field specialist for The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Markets for Ohio-grown hemp products are just starting to be developed. Still, hemp holds potential for farmers in the state, Hall said. An unprecedented number of Ohio farmers this year had to either plant late in the season or could not plant at all because of...

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