News Releases

  1. (Photo: Getty Images)

    How to talk about the environment with people of either political leaning

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—It seems intuitive: A social media post or an ad about an environmental issue written in a way that appeals to conservative values will likely persuade conservatives. But more often than not, messages about environmental issues are framed to resonate primarily with liberal-leaning individuals, said Kristin Hurst, a postdoctoral research associate with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). “They’re preaching to the choir, but they’re not reaching the conservatives they’re trying to convince,” said Hurst, who researches behavior as it relates to sustainability. In a recently published study, she and Marc Stern, a professor at Virginia Tech, wanted to see how different written...
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    News tips and events for the week of March 9

    Tip 1: Boosting sales of food and farm businesses: An upcoming set of workshops is aimed at helping food and farm businesses that sell products such as eggs, pork, or baked goods to identify strategies to increase sales. Participants of the workshops, which will be held March 23 and March 30 in Chillicothe, Ohio, will learn marketing, social media, and sales tactics, among other skills, and will generate a set of goals to improve their businesses. The workshops are being hosted by The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) Center for Cooperatives, Ohio State University Extension Direct Food and Agricultural Marketing Team, and Ohio Farm Bureau. The two workshops will be 2–6 p.m. at the Ross County Service Center, 475 Western Ave.,...
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    How and why to keep phosphorus on no-till fields

    ADA, Ohio—Left untilled, fields gain organic matter and maintain high yields, but there’s a tradeoff to consider when deciding not to till. Fields that aren’t tilled are less likely to erode, sending soil and the components of fertilizer, including phosphorus, downstream, a threat to water quality. However, when rain runs off a field that’s not been tilled, that rain is more likely to carry with it phosphorus in a form that can be readily available to produce algal blooms downstream, said Warren Dick, a retired soil scientist from The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). That’s because fertilizer in a no-till system is not mixed into the soil and often stays at the surface, making it more vulnerable...
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    Chow line: Stocking up in case of emergency

    I keep hearing that people should have an emergency supply of foods on hand in case of emergency, but I have no clue what to get. What food supplies should I stock up on in case of emergency? Good question. Some consumers in certain areas of Washington State have found grocery stores with empty shelves, as many people responded to coronavirus fears and went out in what some have described as a panic, to stock up on supplies. But that’s not a good idea, because panic-buying could lead to shortages of supplies for others if people overbuy items they otherwise really don’t need. To avoid scenarios like that, it’s a good idea to always have on hand at least a three-day supply of nonperishable essentials such as canned foods, dry mixes, and other staples that do not...
  5. Two 4-Hers with a camera

    Ohio leaders proclaim Ohio 4-H Week

    Ohioans will be seeing green even before St. Patrick’s Day this year as 4-H members, in their official colors of green and white, will celebrate 4-H Week March 8–14 throughout the state. Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine and Lt. Gov. Jon Husted officially proclaimed the seven days as Ohio 4-H Week, with a state proclamation released last week. A number of special activities will help increase public awareness of the Ohio 4-H program. As America’s largest youth development organization, 4-H supports about 6 million children nationwide including nearly 172,000 children in Ohio, where 4-H clubs exist in all 88 counties. Ohio also has the distinction of being the birthplace of 4-H. In 1902, schoolteacher A.B. Graham started a youth program in Clark County, Ohio. Since then,...
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    Media Advisory: Ohio State experts offers new webinar on novel coronavirus

    COLUMBUS, Ohio —Linda Saif, a scientist with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM), has recorded “Coronaviruses: One world, one health, mild and severe, human and animal threats” as part of Ohio State’s Global One Health initiative monthly webinar series. View the webinar at go.osu.edu.saifcovid-19. The coronavirus, COVID-19, is being blamed for at least 3,254 deaths and more than 94,902 confirmed illnesses in some 83 countries since December 2019, with at least 155 cases of coronavirus reported in the United States across at least 15 states. At least 10 people have died as a result of COVID-19 in Washington State and one person...
  7. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Another wetter-than-average spring expected

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Farmers anxiously awaiting spring rain forecasts might want to take several deep breaths and keep their rubber boots ready. Above-average spring rainfall is expected in March, April, and May—which is exactly what happened last year.   However, recent forecasts call for warmer-than-average temperatures in March. If that happens, that could dry up some of the ground moisture, making it manageable for farmers to get into their fields to prep them for planting. How much rain will this spring bring? “It’s impossible to say,” said Aaron Wilson, climate specialist for The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  Time will tell whether the rain levels will rival last year’s...
  8. Ohio 4-Hers

    News tips and events for the week of March 2

    Tip 1: Ohio 4-H Week—Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine and Lt. Gov. Jon Husted have officially proclaimed March 8–14 as Ohio 4-H Week. As America’s largest youth development organization, 4-H supports about 6 million children nationwide including nearly 172,000 children in Ohio, where 4-H clubs exist in all 88 counties. A.B. Graham started a youth program in Clark County, Ohio, in 1902, which is considered the birthplace of Ohio 4-H. Although 4-H originally began as an organization for farm children, today it emphasizes leadership and citizenship skills. Additionally, Ohio 4-H alumni are 10% more likely to have a college degree than their counterparts. To learn more about Ohio 4-H and to interview Ohio 4-H members and/or leadership at both the state and county levels, contact Kirk...
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    Chow line: Eating fewer trans or saturated fats better choice for heart health

    I’m focusing on improving my nutrition as part of my overall health resolutions for this year. Do you have any tips on how to make heart-healthy food choices? February is a good time to focus on healthy food choices and heart health, as the month was designated American Heart Month by former U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1963. As such, health care advocates, including the American Heart Association, take this time every year to promote consumer awareness of hearth health and the impact that foods can have on your health. This is significant considering that heart disease is the No. 1 killer of American consumers. Limiting unhealthy foods and making wise food choices are important parts of developing and maintaining a heart-healthy lifestyle. One way to do that is by...
  10. A detailed look at what's new on the updated nutrition facts label. Photo: FDA

    Chow Line: New nutrition labels reflect more accurate serving sizes

    There seems to be something different about the nutrition label on some of the foods I’ve purchased lately. Did the labels change? Yes. In fact, the nutrition labels on some foods have changed and will soon change on other food products, thanks to new rules instituted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The FDA announced the updated nutrition label design in 2016 as part of an effort to reflect updated scientific findings to help consumers make better-informed decisions about food choices and maintain healthy diets, the government agency said. One of the biggest changes consumers can expect to see is a larger, bolder typeface for both calories and serving sizes. The typeface will be easier for people to see and read. And the serving sizes have been updated to better...

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