News Releases

  1. So you want to grow hemp in Ohio?

    Update, Jan. 13: The optional Jan. 25 program has been cancelled. WOOSTER, Ohio—Join experts from The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and beyond in discovering Ohio’s possible new cash crop. A workshop titled “Growing Hemp in Ohio: Separating Fact from Fiction,” featuring 10 sessions by 18 speakers, is set for Jan. 24 at the CFAES Wooster campus, about 60 miles south of Cleveland.  The event will look at the opportunities and challenges facing Ohio hemp growers. Subjects will include hemp plant basics, growing practices, business considerations, rules, and regulations. Also offered is an optional program from 9:30 a.m. to noon the next day, Jan. 25, featuring six sessions by speakers from...
  2. News tips and events for the week of Jan. 6

    Tip 1: Zero Waste success: As a sustainability intern with The Ohio State University’s Zero Waste team, Melina Mallory, an environmental science major in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), spent most of every football game day this season helping divert the tons of trash generated at Ohio Stadium—the beverage cans, nacho trays, and more of 105,000 people—away from landfills and into composting and recycling. The result? The Zero Waste team—unlike, alas, the so-close football Buckeyes—took home a national title. Read the story at go.osu.edu/Bjzu.  January 2020 9 Ohio Commercial Pesticide Recertification Conference, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Dayton Convention Center, 22 East Fifth St., Dayton, Ohio....
  3. Anne Dorrance

    Dorrance named associate dean and director of The Ohio State University Wooster campus

    COLUMBUS—Plant pathologist Anne E. Dorrance has been named to the top leadership position at The Ohio State University Wooster campus. On January 1, 2020, she will begin a four-year term as associate dean and director for the Wooster campus and associate director for the Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station in Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). When announcing Dorrance’s new position, Cathann A. Kress, vice president for agricultural administration of Ohio State and dean of CFAES, said “Dr. Dorrance’s appointment to this position is essential to the continuing success of our Wooster campus and the college.” In her new role, she will also serve on the Vice President and Dean’s Administrative...
  4. Anne E. Dorrance. Photo: CFAES

    News tips and events for the week of Dec. 16

    Tip 1: Dorrance named associate dean and director of The Ohio State University Wooster campus – Plant pathologist Anne E. Dorrance has been named to the top leadership position at The Ohio State University Wooster campus. On January 1, 2020, she will begin a four-year term as associate dean and director for the Wooster campus and associate director for the Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station in Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Read more here. Tip 2: Growing Hemp in Ohio: Separating Fact from Fiction – Farmers, producers and anyone interested in learning more about the potential for growing hemp, a new crop to Ohio, can attend a day-long workshop Jan. 24 at The Ohio State University...
  5. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Hold the raw, unpasteurized eggs from your holiday recipes

    I love to drink eggnog this time of year, and hollandaise sauce is a rich indulgence that puts me in the holiday mood. While I typically make my own eggnog and hollandaise sauce using raw eggs, this year my wife has asked me to avoid the raw eggs. What’s wrong with using raw eggs in those recipes? Count me in among those hundreds of thousands of consumers who indulge in rich, creamy, delicious eggnog this time of year! In fact, some 135 pounds of eggnog is consumed in this country each year, according to research from Indiana University.  But, if you are making your own eggnog—which is a sweetened, dairy-based drink traditionally made with milk, cream, sugar, whipped eggs, and spices—you should make sure that it is safe to drink. You can do this by using...
  6. Distinguished Professors of FAES

    Inaugural Distinguished Professors of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences announced

    COLUMBUS—The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) has announced four inaugural Distinguished Professors of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The title was bestowed on a competitive basis to four full professors who have excelled in teaching, research, or outreach/engagement. In addition, their work has significantly impacted their fields, students, college, university, and/or the public.  The honorees include environmental economist Elena Irwin, plant pathologist Sally Miller, food scientist Devin Peterson, and chemical engineer Judit Puskas. “The selection committee was extremely impressed with all of the nominees and their impactful contributions,” said Cathann A. Kress, vice president for...
  7. Registration open for Farmer and Farmland Owner Income Tax Webinar

    Columbus, Ohio—Are you getting the most from your tax return? Farmers and farmland owners wanting to increase their tax knowledge should consider a Monday, Jan. 13, webinar that will address tax issues specific to this industry. Content will focus on important tax issues and will offer insight into new tax legislation and further guidelines that have been released this year. The live webinar will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. and is being offered by OSU Income Tax Schools, which are a part of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and Ohio State University Extension, which is CFAES’ outreach arm. If you are unable to attend the live webinar, registered participants will receive a link to view the recorded webinar at a time...
  8. Compacted soil.

    News tips and events for the week of Dec. 9

    Tip 1:  Compaction is the topic of the 2020 Precision University. The fall of 2018 and spring of 2019 created less than ideal conditions for field work, leaving many farmers concerned with field compaction. When planting in wet soils, soil particles become pressed together, reducing space between them and limiting the flow of water. Farmer concern is justified as compaction can significantly reduce yields. Researchers have been conducting on-farm trials comparing farming practices to uncover ways farmers can reduce compaction. At the 2020 Precision University, Ohio State University Extension will host some of North America's leading experts on compaction research and management. Hear speakers from Oklahoma State University, Iowa State University, the Ontario...
  9. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Romaine lettuce alert affects Ohio, other states

    I saw that there’s been another alert about romaine lettuce. How do I know whether what’s in my fridge is part of the impacted varieties? Unless you can verify whether the romaine lettuce that’s in your fridge was NOT harvested from Salinas, California, you should throw it out. That’s per the latest warning from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which issued an updated food safety alert on Dec.4. The alert advises consumers, restaurants, and retailers to avoid eating or selling any romaine lettuce grown in the Salinas, California, growing region. This includes all use-by dates and brands of romaine lettuce from the area.  The warning is the result of the recent multistate outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:...
  10. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Late planting leads to wetter harvested grain

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—More Ohio farmers invested extra time and fuel this year to dry their harvested corn and soybeans because both grains were planted several weeks late and had less time to dry in the field. While drying harvested corn in a mechanical dryer is typical each year, some producers in the state dried soybeans this year for the first time ever. “Soybeans dry a whole lot better outside when it’s 70 degrees and you can run around in short sleeves. Farmers are harvesting in winter coats,” said Eric Richer, an Ohio State University Extension educator in Fulton County, on the far northwestern border of the state. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). If grain...

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