News Releases

  1. CFAES testimony at House hearing: Technology can benefit rural America

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—New technology holds promise for America’s small farms and rural businesses, but public-sector involvement—such as for expanding rural broadband access—is needed for that promise to be realized.  So said Doug Jackson-Smith, professor of water security and rural sociology in The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), in comments delivered Jan. 9 in Washington, D.C., to the U.S. House Committee on Small Business’ Subcommittee on Innovation and Workforce Development. “New technology offers opportunities for small businesses, especially small farmers,” Jackson-Smith said at a hearing convened by the subcommittee titled “Farming in the 21st Century:...
  2. A hemp field

    News tips and events for the week of Feb. 3

    Tip 1: An update on hemp production and marketing—Growing hemp continues to be of wide interest throughout Ohio. Two educators with Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), will present a hemp production and marketing opportunities workshop on Monday, Feb. 17, from 7–8:30 p.m., at the Kunz-Brundige Franklin County Extension Building, 2548 Carmack Road, on the Ohio State Columbus campus. Topics will include an Ohio hemp production update, legal and business issues related to hemp production, and agronomic requirements of hemp. Admission is free and no RSVP is required. Speakers will include Lee Beers, a Trumbull County Extension educator, and Peggy Kirk Hall, an...
  3. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Super-safe food for Super Bowl Sunday

    We’re hosting a Super Bowl feast this weekend. Got any tips about how to do so safely?  You’re not alone. Super Bowl Sunday is the second largest food consumption day of the year, second only to Thanksgiving, according to the National Chicken Council. There are several steps you can take to ensure that your guests enjoy the game and the delicious foods you’re serving while not walking away from the buffet with a nasty case of food poisoning. Because your question is very similar to another that was asked in a “Chow Line” column from January 2017, it’s best answered by reissuing that column here.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers several tips to help ensure that your guests have a good meal without the fear of food...
  4. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Ohio hemp growers: Tread slowly

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Got a hankering to grow hemp? Consider the gamble: The crop could generate hundreds, even thousands, of dollars per acre. Or, quite possibly, nothing at all. The market price for CBD oil, which is derived from hemp flowers, has declined recently because of an oversupply on the market. Farmers in some states are awaiting payment for hemp they grew but could not sell. Some other growers are finding it can be very easy for hemp to exceed the legal limit of 0.3% THC; when this happens, the plants must be destroyed.   “Don’t jump in,” said Peggy Hall, an agricultural and resource law field specialist for Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (...
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    Taking the pulse of Ohio farmers

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Extreme weather, trade tensions, declining prices, lack of access to health care, and urban sprawl. To get a better handle on how Ohio farm families are adapting to these challenges, researchers at The Ohio State University will be asking farmers to share their experiences through a new statewide survey this February. The 2020 Ohio Farm Poll will gather information about the current well-being of different types of farmers across the state, including any changes they might be seeing. The questionnaire will provide an opportunity for farmers to share their views with researchers at Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and state policymakers about a range of issues. The survey will be mailed in early February to a...
  6. Photo: A transmission electron micrograph of a coronavirus. Courtesy of Linda Saif.

    News tips and events for the week of Jan. 27

    Tip 1: Ohio State experts available for comment on new coronavirus—Scientists with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) can offer insight into the new coronavirus that is being blamed for at least 81 deaths and more than 2,800 confirmed illnesses internationally since December 2019, with at least five cases of coronavirus reported in the United States—in Washington state; Arizona; Los Angeles; Chicago; and Orange County, California. Additionally, at least 100 other people in the United States are under observation in 26 states, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that include the...
  7. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Warmer and wetter, Ohio's climate is shifting

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Little snow, warmer days. It’s been an unusual winter. Or has it? For the past four decades, Ohio’s winters have been warming twice as fast as its summers. And the state is getting more rainfall as well. 2019 was the sixth wettest year in Ohio and the 12th warmest, said Aaron Wilson, climate specialist for The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).   “It was certainly our wettest decade on record,” Wilson said. On average, Ohio’s annual rainfall has increased 5%–15% since the early 1900s, with the largest increases in areas such as north-central Ohio where fall rainfall has risen by 31%, Wilson said. So far, this winter is proving to be warmer than average....
  8. Photo: A transmission electron micrograph of a coronavirus. Courtesy of Linda Saif.

    Ohio State experts available for comment on new coronavirus

    WOOSTER, Ohio—Scientists with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) can offer insight into the new coronavirus that is being blamed for at least 26 deaths and more than 830 confirmed illnesses internationally since December 2019, with at least two cases of coronavirus reported this week in the United States—in Washington state and Chicago. And at least an additional 50 people in the United States are under observation in 22 states, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that include the common cold, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and Middle East respiratory syndrome (...
  9. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Binge drinking on the rise in certain populations

    Is there a difference between heavy drinking and binge drinking? And do these have any effect on my health? Yes, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines heavy drinking as the consumption of 15 drinks or more per week for men and 8 or more drinks per week for women. On the other hand, they define binge drinking as consuming five or more drinks for men and four or more drinks for women, in about two hours. A binge drinker is someone who experiences at least one binge-drinking episode during a 30-day period. Per the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, a standard alcoholic drink is equivalent to 12 ounces of beer, which is typically about 5% alcohol; 5 ounces of wine, which is typically 12% alcohol; or 1.5 ounces of hard liquor, which is typically 40%...
  10. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Is drinking more water your New Year’s resolution? If so, here’s how to do it.

    As part of my 2020 New Year’s resolution, I’ve pledged to drink more water this year. Do you have any tips on how I can stick to my goal and keep up my water intake? If drinking more water was one of your New Year’s resolutions, you’re not alone. Not only is increasing the amount of water one drinks one of the top consumer resolutions for 2020, but increased water intake continues to be a growing trend as more people seek to boost their hydration rates as part of a healthy lifestyle. For example, bottled water beat soft drinks as the top beverage in the United States by volume in 2017, with sales increasing 7% over sales in 2016, according to the Beverage Marketing Corporation, a New York-based beverage consulting firm. And on any given day, the average...

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