News Releases

  1. basket of leafy greens and carrots

    FDA Listening Session April 30 on Proposed Produce Safety Rule

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- A listening session is scheduled for April 30 to hear comments and concerns about the U.S Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) proposed new food safety rules for fresh produce. The session will be 1 to 4 p.m. in the Shisler Conference Center on the Wooster campus of Ohio State University's Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), 1680 Madison Ave. OARDC is the research arm of Ohio State's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The program is being hosted by the Ohio Department of Agriculture, Ohio State, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Farm Bureau. "The FDA is coming here because they want to hear from Ohio’s produce growers," said Ashley Kulhanek, agriculture and natural resource educator...
  2. child on ATV

    OSU Extension: Day Camps to Teach Farm Safety to Kids

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – School-aged kids across Ohio will have the opportunity to take part in a series of day camps sponsored by Ohio State University Extension this spring and summer focused on how to stay safe on the farm. Farm Safety Round-Up Day Camps are designed to offer youth real-world experience and emphasize farm safety with a goal of teaching kids how to avoid injury, said Kathy Mann, an OSU Extension program coordinator in agricultural safety and health. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The day camps seek to educate kids about the possible hazards they might encounter on the farm, whether they live on the farm or just visit one, Mann said. “Farm safety is important year-round, but...
  3. Ag Answers logo

    Ag Answers News Service Launches Redesigned Website

    WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Purdue and Ohio State universities have redesigned the website of their Ag Answers news service, adding capability for multimedia components and other resources to help farmers better manage their crops, livestock and marketplace transactions.  Ag Answers, a partnership between the Extension services of both universities since 1995, provides timely agricultural problem-solving advice for farmers involved in production agriculture, small farms, horticulture and local foods. The redesigned site, at http://www.aganswers.net, was launched Monday (April 1). "In redesigning the Ag Answers website, we wanted to keep the readers at the forefront of our decisions," said Jennifer Stewart, Ag Answers editor. "They can expect the same research-based...
  4. Chow Line: Keep watch on pregnancy pounds

    My daughter-in-law is pregnant but doesn’t seem to be gaining much weight. She is pleased, but I’m concerned. Should I be? You don’t say how far along in her pregnancy your daughter-in-law is, but you should know that doctors generally recommend women gain only 1 to 4 pounds total during the first three months, and then 2 to 4 pounds per month until birth. However, guidance varies depending on the circumstances. For example, teens who are pregnant are encouraged to gain more weight, as their own bodies are still developing. And a woman’s pre-pregnancy weight plays a major role: According to the Insitute of Medicine, women at a normal weight for their height should gain 25 to 35 pounds during pregnancy. Underweight women should gain more, 28 to 40 pounds....
  5. OSU Extension Expert: Grass Not Yet Ready for Grazing

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – While the calendar may say it is officially spring, the weather outside in many areas may not necessarily agree. As a result, producers may want to hold off grazing for a week or so longer than in a typical year, which could help pastures build up the roots to allow for a more productive grazing season, an Ohio State University Extension expert said. This time last year, Ohio was at least two weeks ahead of normal in terms of pasture growth, thanks to the warmer, milder winter and early spring experienced in many areas, said Chris Penrose, an OSU Extension educator. But the colder, wetter weather this year has left growth weeks behind normal, leaving grass that is not ready for grazing, he said. “This extra period of wet weather is causing a problem...
  6. Asiatic garden beetle

    Asiatic Garden Beetle Could be Cause for Concern for Northern Ohio Corn

    WOOSTER, Ohio – Northern Ohio corn growers who’ve experienced unexplained stand loss for the past couple of years may have fields that are infested with Asiatic garden beetle grubs. The grubs are a relatively new pest to Ohio field crops and have the potential to cause significant economic losses for growers, an Ohio State University Extension entomologist said. Last year was the first known instance of Asiatic garden beetle grubs causing significant stand losses in corn in northern Ohio just below Lake Erie, said Ron Hammond, who also has an appointment with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Growers who planted corn following soybeans in sandier soils reported last year finding Asiatic garden beetle grubs that caused some stand losses, he said. What...
  7. OSU Extension, OARDC Offer Beef Cattle Artificial Insemination School April 30-May 2

    BELLE VALLEY, Ohio – Beef cattle producers who want boost their profit potential by increasing their success with artificial insemination can attend a school on the subject April 30 through May 2, taught by Ohio State University Extension and Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center experts. The three-day program covers a broad range of artificial insemination topics including factors that influence reproduction efficiencies, heat synchronization, semen handling and thawing, said Clif Little, OSU Extension educator in agriculture and natural resources. The techniques taught at the school are important for beef cattle producers because they can influence how effectively a producer will succeed with artificial insemination, Little said. “One reason we do this...
  8. Yael Vodovotz in her office

    Researcher Focuses on Developing Foods with a Boost for Health

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Just about everyone agrees that food and health are inextricably linked. But Yael Vodovotz goes well beyond that standard: the Ohio State University food scientist focuses on creating new functional foods that potentially could prevent and treat chronic disease without demanding that consumers make major changes to their diet. Among the products under development: Soy-based bread that contains enough soy to approach what's typical in the soy-rich Asian diet. Soy-based soft pretzels with a low glycemic index to fight diabetes and weight gain. Black raspberry confections and nectar packed with polyphenols to battle prostate and oral cancer. The idea is to formulate foods with specific health benefits that can be easily incorporated into the typical American diet,...
  9. school garden

    School Gardens Offer Myriad Benefits, Take Planning

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Planting seeds: that's what you can do with a school garden, not only in the ground, but in the minds of young people. "Using the environment as a context for learning is an incredible tool," said Susan Hogan, program assistant for Ohio State University Extension's 4-H Youth Development program. "Gardening at school sites addresses many of the science academic content standards and also increases social and interpersonal skills," Hogan said. "Sometimes, children who have learning difficulties or who are struggling do better when they're learning outdoors.” Hogan, who has experience working in environmental education, joined OSU Extension in December. As spring approached, she began getting more inquiries from area schools for...
  10. food pantry shelves

    Project Focuses on Improving Food Pantries in Rural Food Deserts

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Ohio State University Extension is taking part in a five-year, $4 million grant to help isolated communities increase availability of nutritious foods. "We're focusing on areas defined as 'rural food deserts' as defined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture," said Dan Remley, field specialist in food, nutrition and wellness for OSU Extension and Ohio's representative on the project's team. "These are low-income census tracts where a substantial number or share of people are far from supermarkets, generally in the southern and eastern parts of the state." The project, called "Voices for Food," is being led by South Dakota State University and also includes land-grant university researchers in Indiana, Michigan, Missouri...

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