News Releases

  1. Chow Line: Focus on safety with mailed food gifts

    Last year we received a gift in the mail and didn’t open it until Christmas Eve. The box contained cheese spreads that said “Keep refrigerated” on the label. They had been at room temperature for more than a week, so we threw them out. But since then, I’ve seen some types of cheese spreads sold at the grocery store on the shelf. Were we being overly cautious? If the label said “Keep refrigerated,” you absolutely did the right thing. But it’s no wonder you’re confused. There are many different types of cheese and processed cheese products, and some don’t need to be refrigerated until they’re opened. It depends on several factors, including the product’s moisture content, its level of acidity, its packaging, and how it was...
  2. Poinsettias

    Poinsettia's Poisonous Reputation Persists, Despite Proof to the Contrary

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- Perhaps it has happened to you: You present a friend with a beautiful poinsettia for the holidays, and she shrinks in horror. How could you possibly give her something that could be deadly to Fifi or Fluff or little Freddy? The good news is that it’s not, though you may have a hard time convincing her. “Every year, people ask me if poinsettias are poisonous to people and pets,” said Robert McMahon, associate professor and coordinator of the greenhouse program at Ohio State University's Agricultural Technical Institute in Wooster. Students in the program grow and sell approximately 1,200 poinsettias each year. “I try my best each year to spread the word that they are not.” Disproven years ago by Ohio State research, the myth persists....
  3. OARDC CNG car logo

    OARDC Adds Greener, Bi-fuel Vehicles to Its Fleet

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- The Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) now has four environmentally friendly bi-fuel vehicles on the road as part of a new demonstration project. Using $46,000 in grant funding from the nonprofit group Clean Fuels Ohio, the center recently had four of its fleet vehicles -- three Ford Fusion sedans and a GMC Sierra pickup truck -- converted to run on either gasoline or compressed natural gas (CNG), which is a less-polluting fuel that’s also cheaper. Furthermore, OARDC officials expect most of the CNG burned in the vehicles to come from renewable biogas produced locally by one of the center’s industry partners, Cleveland-based quasar energy group. The company operates a biogas-producing waste digester and CNG...
  4. John Finer at his lab.

    Finer Elected Fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- John Finer, a professor in Ohio State University's Department of Horticulture and Crop Science, has been elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) -- a recognition bestowed upon leading researchers for their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to promote science or its applications. Based on the Wooster campus of the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), Finer is one of 18 Ohio State faculty elected among this year's AAAS class. OARDC is the research arm of the university’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.   Finer was recognized for "distinguished contributions in...
  5. Oats

    OSU Extension: Ohio Oats Expected to Produce Excellent Yields and Good Supplement for Low Forage Supplies Thanks to Drought

    LANCASTER, Ohio – Ohio growers this year have planted more oats after wheat and into early harvested corn silage fields. And thanks to late-season rains, the crop is expected to produce “excellent yields,” which is a boost to producers suffering through low forage supplies after drought, an Ohio State University Extension beef cattle expert said. Although late rains haven’t been abundant, they’ve provided enough moisture to produce excellent oat yields and quality for many growers throughout the state, said Stan Smith, an OSU Extension program assistant in agriculture and natural resources.  That’s significant considering that the drought of 2012 has been one of the worst on record in Ohio, leaving many livestock producers hard-hit in their...
  6. 2012 Land Use Conference

    OSU Extension to Host Statewide Land-Use Conference January 2013

      COLUMBUS, Ohio – Government officials, planners, developers, landowners, farmers, producers and those interested in land-use implications regarding everything from agriculture as an economic force to planning for oil and gas use, can participate in discussions on those issues and more during the 2013 Ohio Land Use Conference, Jan. 11 in Columbus. Sponsored by Ohio State University Extension, Lake Erie Commission, Ohio Water Resources Council, Ohio Balanced Growth Program and Cleveland State University, the “Linking Land Use and the Economy: Our Land, Our Water, Our Future” conference runs from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, 2201 Fred Taylor Drive on Ohio State’s Columbus campus. The conference kicks off with an...
  7. Chow Line: Plenty of options to replace olive oil (11/30/12)

    What kind of oil is the best to use for heart health? I tend to use olive oil all the time, but I’ve been looking for alternatives. Many consumers wonder about olive oil these days, ever since a 2007 article in The New Yorker revealed that much olive oil sold worldwide as “extra virgin” doesn’t meet that designation’s premium-grade standard, having been mixed with other types of oil. The report was corroborated in 2010 when the University of California-Davis reported that 69 percent of imported olive oil it tested didn’t meet the standard. Although questions about quality and truth-in-labeling remain (for details, see http://www.truthinoliveoil.com/), olive oil remains a heart-healthy option. Most types of oil normally used for cooking are high in...
  8. Wind turbine and solar panels at the Great Lakes Science Center in Cleveland.

    Cleveland, Similar Cities Could Produce Most of Their Energy: Ohio State Study

      Increased urban energy self-reliance would add between $28.7 million and $1.76 billion to Cleveland's economy annually. WOOSTER, Ohio -- Cleveland and similar North American cities have the potential to generate up to 100 percent of their current energy needs, retaining millions of dollars in the local economy, creating new jobs and spurring additional environmental benefits.   Those are some of the findings of a study conducted by Parwinder Grewal, director of the Center for Urban Environment and Economic Development at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) -- the research arm of Ohio State University's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental...
  9. Wayne County Farmers Dan and Randy Bower examine drought-impacted corn

    Post 2012 Election: Farm Bill and the Fiscal Cliff

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – With the election of 2012 over, it may be a good thing that the forthcoming debate over the so-called fiscal cliff of automatic budget cuts and tax increases coincides with the ongoing debate over the farm bill, an Ohio State University farm policy expert said. The debate over the 2012 Farm Bill involves many aspects of the broader policy discussions currently occurring in the U.S., said Carl Zulauf, who is also a professor in Ohio State’s Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics.  In a paper written the day after the election, Zulauf said that while it is risky to simplify the policy environment in any country as large and diverse as the U.S., “many issues confronting the U.S. at present can be viewed as...
  10. Students access healthy foods at school thanks to Farm to School program

    Ohio State to Host Statewide Farm to School Conference March 2013

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – More than 250 farmers, producers, educators, school food service professionals, business leaders and Ohio State University Extension experts are expected to attend a statewide conference on the Farm to School program, with a goal to continue to get more fresh, locally grown and produced foods into more school cafeterias. OSU Extension will host the Farm to School conference March 13, 2013, as part of an effort to continue to expand the successful program, which works to increase students’ access to healthy foods and to help them learn more about food, health, nutrition and agriculture.  Farm to School is a national program, which in Ohio is led by OSU Extension and is supported by numerous agencies, foundations and industry organizations. OSU...

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