News Releases

  1. OSU Extension offers Beef Cattle School Jan. 29, Feb. 26 and March 19

      COLUMBUS, Ohio – Producers interested in learning more about how to increase cattle profits, including an in-depth look at crossbreeding programs, can participate in a discussion of the issues by experts from Ohio State University Extension and nationwide, during a Beef Cattle School Jan. 29, Feb. 26 and March 19 at several locations statewide.  The beef cattle school kicks off Jan. 29 with presentations from two nationally known cattle experts who will discuss how crossbreeding can boost profits for producers and how genetic selection tools have contributed to the de-emphasis on heterosis by some commercial cow-calf producers, said John Grimes, beef coordinator for OSU Extension and a member of the OSU Extension Beef Team. Lee Leachman of the Leachman Cattle Company...
  2. Family Fundamentals: Credit: Know what you owe, how you’ll pay it off

    How can I calculate how much total interest I will be charged until I get my credit card bill paid off? First, good for you for thinking in these terms. Too many people, especially young people, continue to rack up so much debt on credit cards that they may not be able to pay it off — ever. In fact, a recent Ohio State University study showed that many younger people — those born between 1980 and 1984 — tend to spend more money than they make every month, making up the difference on their credit cards. The result could be a lifetime of trying to manage credit card debt. The researchers said it was likely many could die decades from now, still owing money on their cards. The key, obviously, is to live within your means, stop using credit, and make higher monthly...
  3. Chow Line: Be aware of risks from eating sprouts

    I really miss topping my salads off with a handful of alfalfa sprouts. What makes them so unsafe? It doesn’t seem that long ago that sprouts were ubiquitous at every salad bar you approached. Not so much anymore. They’ve even disappeared from some major grocery store chains after numerous outbreaks traced to sprouts in recent years. The problem is in the way sprouts grow: Seeds need warm, moist growing conditions to sprout — exactly the conditions that illness-causing bacteria, such as Salmonella and E. coli, need to thrive. Even if there’s just a small amount of bacteria on or inside a seed, those cells can multiply to dangerous levels within hours in such conditions. The irony is that raw sprouts have long been touted as one of nature’s most potent...
  4. Organic peppers

    Organic Farming Conference Features Record 27 Ohio State University Presenters, Feb. 16-17

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – From vegetable grafting and dairy cow management to plasticulture strawberry production and organic grain production, Ohio State University professionals will present pertinent information on some of the key issues in organic and sustainable agriculture next month during Ohio’s largest sustainable food and farm conference.  The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association’s (OEFFA) 34th annual conference, Growing Opportunities, Cultivating Change, is Feb. 16-17 in Granville, Ohio. And with 27 workshops, Ohio State scientists, specialists and students will offer a record number of presentations during the event, which is expected to draw 1,200 participants, organizers said.  The previous high was 19 workshops...
  5. stock image, person with pitchfork in front of vegetable row crops

    Produce Growers: Review, Comment on Proposed Food Safety Rule

    MEDINA, Ohio -- Ohio's produce farmers may want to take some time to review the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's newly proposed Produce Safety rule. They have until May 16 to comment before the rule is finalized, said Ashley Kulhanek, agriculture and natural resources educator for Ohio State University Extension. After finalization, the rule will take effect for some operators within a mere 60 days. "That's a short period of time after finalization before they have to comply with the new rules," she said. The proposed Produce Safety rule, announced on Jan. 4 and published in the Federal Register today, is one way the government is putting the Food Safety Modernization Act into practice. The act was signed into law in January 2011, and growers and the food...
  6. Chow Line logo

    Chow Line: Boost nutrients, cut fat in recipes

    I’m looking for easy ways to make some of my recipes and meals healthier. Any ideas? This is a great way to start the new year, and yes, there are plenty of ideas to increase nutrients and reduce fat and calories in the foods you prepare at home. Below are some favorites, primarily from Ohio State University Extension (see “Modifying a Recipe to be Healthier” at http://ohioline.osu.edu) and eXtension (see “Recipe Substitutions” at http://www.extension.org). To reduce fat: Use evaporated skim milk instead of cream. Use 1/4 cup egg substitute or two egg whites in place of a whole egg. In quick breads, muffins, brownies or cakes, substitute half or all of the oil, butter or other shortening with unsweetened applesauce, mashed bananas or fruit puree....
  7. TriLateral agreement

    Tri-lateral Partnership Addresses African Food Security

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Ohio State University has a long history of cultivating international relationships. Now the university's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) is expanding that role through the Office of International Programs in Agriculture by forming a three-way partnership designed to bring together university expertise at Ohio State, Punjab Agricultural University (PAU) in India and Egerton University in Kenya. The U.S./India/Africa Tri-lateral University Partnership Program for Food Security will combine the strengths of PAU with Ohio State's expertise in agricultural capacity-building to address poverty and hunger issues in Kenya and throughout Africa.    The program is a joint effort of the U.S. government and the government of...
  8. OARDC's Yebo Li (left) and Touchstone's Doug Amie check a water sample from one of the indoor ponds growing algae in Wooster. (Photo by Ken Chamberlain)

    Algae Farming Technology Yields Renewable Fuel, Uses Waste as Fertilizer

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- Right next to a commercial nursery and greenhouse operation on the outskirts of Wooster, paddlewheels keep water constantly moving in four 30-by-200-foot ponds shaped like automotive raceway circuits. The water is deep green and murky. That's just how Phil Lane likes it. Lane is a program manager for Touchstone Research Laboratory, a West Virginia-based company that operates this unusual facility on a stretch of farmland where the remnants of corn and soybean fields are now buried under snow. And the stuff making the ponds green is another type of crop that could one day grow alongside the more traditional fare occupying Ohio fields: algae. "Algae can be grown just about anywhere, so we...
  9. Scientist Warren Dick at coal-burning power plant with FGD gypsum

    Coal Plant Byproduct, If Spread on Farms, Could Fight Lake Erie Algae

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- An Ohio State University scientist says an abundant byproduct from coal-burning power plants, if spread on farmers’ fields, could help control Lake Erie’s harmful algal blooms.  Warren Dick, a soil biochemist in the university’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), said applying fluidized gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum to crop fields can keep soluble phosphorus, the main nutrient feeding the algae, from getting washed from the soil by heavy rains, then running off into streams and rivers and eventually into the lake. “Not only that, but FGD gypsum, which is a synthetic form of gypsum, can improve both the soil and the crops,” he said. “Naturally occurring, mined gypsum has...
  10. Ohio farm scene

    Ohio State Food, Ag, Env Calendar Listings as of Jan. 7

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Here are upcoming events involving Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences as of Jan. 7: January NEW: Jan. 9: Registration deadline for Certified Crop Adviser Pre-Exam Training Seminar Jan. 16-17 in Sidney. $225; includes preparation sessions, lunches, handouts. Information: http://www.regonline.com/CCAPrep. NEW: Jan. 10: Registration deadline for Ohio Farmland Preservation Summit Jan. 17 in Columbus. $50; includes continental breakfast, lunch. Registration, information: http://go.osu.edu/farmlandsummit2013. NEW: Jan. 11: Ohio Land Use Conference, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, 2201 Fred Taylor Drive, Columbus. Registration...

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