News Releases

  1. Farmland Preservation Summit Set for Jan. 17

      COLUMBUS, Ohio – Farmers, landowners, planners, local officials, land trust leadership, economic development professionals and anyone interested in preserving farmland in Ohio can get tips from the experts on the subject during a farmland summit on Jan. 17.  The 13th  annual Ohio Farmland Preservation Summit is designed to help interested parties learn various techniques, tools and methods to preserve farmland, said Mike Hogan, an Ohio State University Extension educator and Small Farm Program coordinator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.  During past farmland summits, experts have presented tools on legal ways for people to preserve farm land, he said.  “This...
  2. OSU Logo

    Note to CFAES News Release Subscribers

    Dear Subscriber of News Releases from Ohio State's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, In the next day or two, our news releases will start arriving in your inbox from a new email address: "CFAES News" <CFAESnews@osu.edu>. Nothing else is changing, but we thought we should give you a heads-up. Please add "cfaesnews@osu.edu" to your address book to ensure future news releases reach your inbox. If you have any questions, please contact Martha Filipic at filipic.3@osu.edu. Thank you, Suzanne Steel and the rest of the CFAES News Team: Mauricio Espinoza Martha Filipic Kurt Knebusch Tracy Turner
  3. Produce seedlings

    Fruit and Vegetable Safety: Good Agricultural Practices Training Set for Jan. 24 in Central Ohio

    MARYSVILLE, Ohio -- A program on preventing microbial contamination on fruit and vegetable farms will take place from 6-9 p.m. on Jan. 24 at the Union County office of Ohio State University Extension, 18000 State Route 4, Suite E, in Marysville. Food safety and Good Agricultural Practices, or GAPs, for fruit and vegetable production are the focus. “The Food and Drug Administration should be releasing draft standards for safe production and harvest of fruits and vegetables as part of the Food Safety Modernization Act,” said Ashley Kulhanek of Ohio State University’s Fruit and Vegetable Safety Team, the program’s sponsor. “Whether or not a farm will be exempt from these rules, the new year is a good time to learn about GAPs.” Kuhlanek said release of...
  4. Maple syrup bottles

    Ohio Maple Days Set for Jan. 24-26

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- This year’s Ohio Maple Days are set for Jan. 24 in Morrow County, Jan. 25 for Wayne and Holmes counties, and Jan. 26 in Geauga County. The programs, which are the same at each location, offer educational sessions on maple production. They’re timed to help producers get ready for the coming season. Both hobby and commercial producers are welcome. The sponsor is Ohio State University Extension, which is the statewide outreach arm of Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The program’s locations: Jan. 24, Morrow County, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Lutheran Memorial Camp, 2790 State Route 61, Fulton. Jan. 25, Wayne and Holmes counties, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Mennonite Christian Assembly Church,...
  5. Project Cultivates Tanzanian Agricultural Expertise for Future

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Tanzania, a country of 42 million nestled on the east coast of Africa, is undergoing a sea change demographically. Currently, about one-third of Tanzanians live below the poverty line, and more than 4 of 10 Tanzanian children suffer from stunting due to malnutrition. By 2050, Tanzania's population is anticipated to double, and its urban population will exceed its rural population. To keep pace with these demographic changes and to reduce high rates of malnutrition, agricultural productivity will need to increase.  That's one reason why Tanzania is a focus country of Feed the Future, the Global Hunger and Food Security Initiative of the U.S. government. And it's why eight Tanzanians are currently enrolled in advanced degree programs in Ohio...
  6. Chow Line logo

    Chow Line: Watch sugar intake over holidays

    I have a sweet tooth. I’ve been cutting back on sugar lately, but I’m worried about the holidays and all the extra sweets. Do you have any guidance? It’s a good idea to eat less sugar -- added sugar, that is. It’s estimated that Americans consume 16 percent of total calories from added sugar -- the kind of sugar that’s added to foods during processing or preparation, as opposed to the type naturally found in fruit and other whole foods. That 16 percent is equal to 320 calories a day on a 2,000 calorie-a-day diet -- far more than recommended. The American Heart Association suggests that women consume no more than 100 calories a day from added sugars, and men no more than 150 calories a day. The nutrition community agrees that cutting back on sugar...
  7. disaster preparedness  kit

    Armageddon or Not, Now's an Opportune Time to Prepare for Emergency

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- If doomsday -- or, alternatively, winter -- is approaching, you'd better be prepared. Whether you believe Dec. 21, 2012, marks the end of the world as predicted by the expiration of an ancient Mayan calendar or merely designates the 2012 winter solstice, it's not a bad idea to have a disaster kit ready, said Kent McGuire, health and safety coordinator for Ohio State University's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and Ohio State University Extension. "A wide variety of winter weather conditions can easily create an emergency situation,” McGuire said. “Conditions such as extreme cold temperatures, above-normal snowfall, ice storms, or blizzard conditions caused by wind can significantly reduce your ability to function...
  8. Walnuts

    Media Advisory: Ohio State Experts Available to Speak on Thousand Cankers Disease in Walnut Trees

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- The following experts in Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences are available to speak with reporters about the first discovery in Ohio of the walnut twig beetle. The insect is known to carry the fungus that causes deadly Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD) in walnut trees. The disease itself hasn’t been found at this time, only the insect that can carry it, and only at a single wood-processing business in Butler County in the southwest part of the state, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources and the Ohio Department of Agriculture, which announced the discovery on Monday (12/10). Read the agencies’ press release at http://go.osu.edu/QrY. Nancy Taylor is program director of the C. Wayne...
  9. OSU Expert: Farmland Value Projected to Increase in 2013

      COLUMBUS, Ohio – Cropland values in Ohio increased in 2012 and are expected to continue on an upward trend in 2013, despite the drought that devastated growers this year, an Ohio State University Extension expert said.  Ohio cropland value rose 13.6 percent this year, with bare cropland averaging $5,000 an acre, said Barry Ward, production business management leader for OSU Extension.  Ward, citing statistics from the Ohio Agriculture Statistics Service, expects the trend to continue next year, with “projected budgets for Ohio’s primary crops for 2013 showing the potential for strong profits.” This is true, he said, in spite of the drought of 2012, which devastated growers and producers across the country, particularly in the Midwest...
  10. OSU Extension Expert: Cold Weather Increases Livestock Energy Needs

      WOOSTER, Ohio – While colder temperatures now experienced throughout the region mean livestock producers need to be aware of increased livestock energy requirements, those animals that may be thinner because of the drought could need extra energy supplements sooner, an Ohio State University Extension educator said. Cold temperatures, cold rains and muddy conditions can significantly increase the energy required by livestock metabolism to provide enough heat for the animal to maintain its body temperature, said Rory Lewandowski, an agricultural and natural resources educator for OSU Extension. But those animals that have less body condition and less body fat as a result of grazing on drought-impacted pastures may need to have that additional supplement sooner to be able to...

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