News Releases

  1. P Risk Index tile drainage

    Ohio State Researcher to Re-write Ohio’s Phosphorus Index to Improve Water Quality

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Grand Lake St. Marys has lost an estimated $60-80 million in tourism due to harmful algae blooms. And in 2011, algae blooms covered 990 square miles of Lake Erie’s surface area, the largest in the lake’s history. Phosphorus is the pollutant most often implicated in the degradation of Ohio’s fresh surface water, with use of phosphorus fertilizer on farmland as a contributing factor. To help mitigate these water quality issues, an Ohio State University researcher has launched a $2 million project to evaluate and, as necessary, revise the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Natural Resources Conservation Service Ohio Phosphorus (P) Risk Index to better predict the risk of phosphorus moving off farm fields.  Elizabeth Dayton, a soil scientist in Ohio...
  2. Ohio State researcher Yebo Li checks biomass samples for biogas production in his Wooster laboratory.

    Ohio State Receives $6.5M Grant for Bioenergy, Biofuel Research

      Project will research production of biogas from yard waste, corn residue and bioenergy crops for conversion to electricity and transportation fuels. WOOSTER, Ohio -- Ohio State University's Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center(OARDC) has received a $6.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of Energy to test and expand a university-developed technology that can produce biogas from a variety of solid organic wastes and bioenergy crops. Awarded through the Biomass Research Development Initiative (BRDI), the three-year grant will also allow researchers to develop technology for converting biogas to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, with the aim of...
  3. Chow Line logo

    Chow Line: Limit trans fats, boost heart health

    What has been the effect from the ban on trans fats in New York City restaurants? Restrictions on the use of partially hydrogenated vegetable oils at restaurants in New York City appear to have slashed the amount of trans fat that their patrons consume. First, some background: Both saturated fat and trans fat increase blood cholesterol levels. High cholesterol increases the risk of heart disease, so health officials have long looked for ways to reduce such fats in the diet. Trans fat has a far more negative effect than saturated fat. It’s estimated that an increase of just 2 percent of total calorie intake from trans fat -- the equivalent of 40 calories in a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet, or 4.5 grams of trans fat -- increases the risk of heart disease by as much as 23 percent...
  4. chow line logo

    Chow Line: Why it’s important to eat breakfast

    I rarely eat breakfast. Can you explain why it’s so important? I’m always looking for ways to try to lose weight, and it seems like a good idea to not eat when I’m not hungry, which is typically in the morning. On the surface, your habits make some sense. Nutritionists regularly encourage people to become more attuned to their inner hunger and appetite signals, and not eating (or stopping eating) when your hunger is satisfied is doing just that. But this raises the question: Why aren’t you hungry in the morning? The whole reason the meal is called “breakfast” is because by eating it, you’re breaking the fast you’ve experienced overnight. Do you typically eat a heavy dinner or have a high-calorie snack at night? Cutting back later in the...
  5. Students inside Deep Space Habitat

    Space Gardening? Ohio State Creates Food-production System for Future NASA Missions

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- Say you are on Mars and fancy a salad. Unless the Curiosity rover can make an unexpected find of fresh romaine somewhere on the dusty Red Planet, you are looking at a nine-month trip to the nearest produce aisle on Earth. A better option? Grow the salad yourself. That's exactly the approach NASA is taking as it plans for future manned expeditions to places like the moon or Mars, where food availability will be a significant challenge. Joining this mission is a team of Ohio State University researchers and students who are helping NASA figure out the best way to grow food aboard space exploration units. The team, from the university's Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering (...
  6. Researcher Katrina Cornish in the greenhouse with guayule plant.

    Pilot Plant, Research Advancements Help Drive Domestic Natural Rubber Project Forward

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- The 6,000-square-foot pilot plant in Wooster makes gloves and a variety of other latex and rubber products. This is nothing new in a town and region historically known for rubber manufacturing. What's different about the facility is the source of its natural rubber: plants grown in the United States rather than the Southeast Asian trees that currently provide all of the world's supply of natural rubber. Established earlier this year, this unique pilot plant is operated by Ohio State University's Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). It's a crucial step in the university's effort to develop and commercialize domestic natural rubber sources that could one day replace a...
  7. CFAES Student

    $1.5 Million in Scholarships Available to CFAES Students

    The College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences offers students $1.5 million in scholarships.
  8. Ohio State University research has been key to the growth of Ohio's rapidly expanding grape and wine industries.

    Commercial Wine Production and Grape Growers Workshop Is Nov. 15 in Southern Ohio

    PIKETON, Ohio – Wine grape growers, commercial wine operators, and those interested in becoming either one can learn the practical and essential skills needed to be successful in the industry at a workshop held by Ohio State University horticulture, viticulture and enology experts Nov. 15.  The program is from 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. at the OSU South Centers’ Endeavor Center, 1862 Shyville Road, in Piketon. The workshop is designed to help growers and winemakers, as well as to boost Ohio's wine industry, said Gary Gao, an Ohio State University Extension specialist and associate professor of small fruit crops at OSU South Centers at Piketon. “It’s good for grape growers to talk to winemakers, because you have to have good fruit in order to make good wine, so...
  9. stock image of older person gardening

    Study Provides Insight on Residents of Rural Food Deserts

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- "Food deserts" are normally thought of as low-income, blighted urban neighborhoods with little access to fresh, reasonably priced fruits and vegetables. But rural areas, despite their wide-open spaces and fertile farmland, can be food deserts, too. An Ohio State University Extension community development specialist worked with two student interns to examine this seeming paradox to discover more about people who live in rural food deserts and how they access fresh produce. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, rural residents who live at least 10 miles away from a grocery store live in a food desert, said Tom Blaine. “Participants in our study lived an average of 11 miles from a grocery store," Blaine said. "Typically in more...
  10. chow line logo

    Chow Line: Whole grains turn up in surprising places

    A group of us were watching a football game last week, and someone claimed that the tortilla chips we were eating counted as a “whole-grain” food. I find that hard to believe. Is that right? It could be. To determine whether a food is “whole grain,” take a look at the ingredients on the food label. You’ll find that many types of tortilla chips and other corn-based snack chips list “whole-grain corn” as the primary ingredient. Whole-grain corn, like whole wheat or other whole grains, is indeed, well, a whole grain. While this could mean the chips are a better choice than a snack made entirely of refined grains, don’t take that as permission to down a family-size package. While the U.S. Dietary Guidelines recommend that at least half the...

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