News Releases

  1. Chow Line logo

    Chow Line: Boost nutrients, cut fat in recipes

    I’m looking for easy ways to make some of my recipes and meals healthier. Any ideas? This is a great way to start the new year, and yes, there are plenty of ideas to increase nutrients and reduce fat and calories in the foods you prepare at home. Below are some favorites, primarily from Ohio State University Extension (see “Modifying a Recipe to be Healthier” at http://ohioline.osu.edu) and eXtension (see “Recipe Substitutions” at http://www.extension.org). To reduce fat: Use evaporated skim milk instead of cream. Use 1/4 cup egg substitute or two egg whites in place of a whole egg. In quick breads, muffins, brownies or cakes, substitute half or all of the oil, butter or other shortening with unsweetened applesauce, mashed bananas or fruit puree....
  2. TriLateral agreement

    Tri-lateral Partnership Addresses African Food Security

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Ohio State University has a long history of cultivating international relationships. Now the university's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) is expanding that role through the Office of International Programs in Agriculture by forming a three-way partnership designed to bring together university expertise at Ohio State, Punjab Agricultural University (PAU) in India and Egerton University in Kenya. The U.S./India/Africa Tri-lateral University Partnership Program for Food Security will combine the strengths of PAU with Ohio State's expertise in agricultural capacity-building to address poverty and hunger issues in Kenya and throughout Africa.    The program is a joint effort of the U.S. government and the government of...
  3. OARDC's Yebo Li (left) and Touchstone's Doug Amie check a water sample from one of the indoor ponds growing algae in Wooster. (Photo by Ken Chamberlain)

    Algae Farming Technology Yields Renewable Fuel, Uses Waste as Fertilizer

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- Right next to a commercial nursery and greenhouse operation on the outskirts of Wooster, paddlewheels keep water constantly moving in four 30-by-200-foot ponds shaped like automotive raceway circuits. The water is deep green and murky. That's just how Phil Lane likes it. Lane is a program manager for Touchstone Research Laboratory, a West Virginia-based company that operates this unusual facility on a stretch of farmland where the remnants of corn and soybean fields are now buried under snow. And the stuff making the ponds green is another type of crop that could one day grow alongside the more traditional fare occupying Ohio fields: algae. "Algae can be grown just about anywhere, so we...
  4. Scientist Warren Dick at coal-burning power plant with FGD gypsum

    Coal Plant Byproduct, If Spread on Farms, Could Fight Lake Erie Algae

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- An Ohio State University scientist says an abundant byproduct from coal-burning power plants, if spread on farmers’ fields, could help control Lake Erie’s harmful algal blooms.  Warren Dick, a soil biochemist in the university’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), said applying fluidized gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum to crop fields can keep soluble phosphorus, the main nutrient feeding the algae, from getting washed from the soil by heavy rains, then running off into streams and rivers and eventually into the lake. “Not only that, but FGD gypsum, which is a synthetic form of gypsum, can improve both the soil and the crops,” he said. “Naturally occurring, mined gypsum has...
  5. Ohio farm scene

    Ohio State Food, Ag, Env Calendar Listings as of Jan. 7

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Here are upcoming events involving Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences as of Jan. 7: January NEW: Jan. 9: Registration deadline for Certified Crop Adviser Pre-Exam Training Seminar Jan. 16-17 in Sidney. $225; includes preparation sessions, lunches, handouts. Information: http://www.regonline.com/CCAPrep. NEW: Jan. 10: Registration deadline for Ohio Farmland Preservation Summit Jan. 17 in Columbus. $50; includes continental breakfast, lunch. Registration, information: http://go.osu.edu/farmlandsummit2013. NEW: Jan. 11: Ohio Land Use Conference, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, 2201 Fred Taylor Drive, Columbus. Registration...
  6. Peaches in crate

    Keep It Peachy: Produce Safety Workshop Is Jan. 30

    COSHOCTON, Ohio -- Ohio State University’s Fruit and Vegetable Safety Team will hold a program on preventing microbial contamination on fruit and vegetable farms from 6-9 p.m. on Jan. 30 in the Coshocton County Services Building, Room 125, 724 S. Seventh St., in Coshocton. Food safety and Good Agricultural Practices, or GAPs, for fruit and vegetable production are the focus. “The Food and Drug Administration has just released draft standards for safe production and harvest of fruits and vegetables as part of the Food Safety Modernization Act,” said Ashley Kulhanek, the team’s program coordinator. “Whether or not a farm will be exempt from these rules, the new year is a good time to learn about GAPs.” The instructors will be...
  7. Collaboration between Green Circle Growers' Dean Palm and Ohio State's Luis Cañas has led to more effective, greener ways to grow poinsettias.

    Scarlet or Not, Ohio State Works to Make Sure Your Poinsettias Are the Best

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- If you live in Ohio and bought a poinsettia for the holidays, chances are Ohio State University agricultural scientists, educators or alumni had a hand in making them look beautiful and healthy. The university's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) is involved in all areas that support poinsettia production -- training students on growing techniques and proper care, working with producers to address their needs and evaluate new varieties, and conducting research that tackles pest management problems unique to this popular plant. Such support is crucial for the success of Ohio's greenhouse industry, which is a major national player in poinsettia production and boasts some of...
  8. OSU Extension to Offer Beef Feedlot School in January, February

      BUCYRUS, Ohio -- Farmers and producers interested in learning more about beef feedlot nutrition and maximizing profits can participate in a discussion of the issues by experts from Ohio State University Extension during a Beef Feedlot School Jan. 30 and Feb. 13, 20 and 27, 2013, from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Crawford County Fairgrounds youth building, 610 Whetstone St. in Bucyrus.  The school will focus on beef feedlot nutrition, maximizing profits by increasing feed efficiency and using byproducts to reduce feed costs, said Jason Hartschuh, OSU Extension coordinator in agriculture and natural resources, and organizer of the event.  “With the rising costs of inputs and grain prices being at record levels it will be important for...
  9. OSU Extension: Producers May Need to Supplement Feed to Ensure Successful and Productive Calving Season

      PIKETON, Ohio – Producers who want to assure a healthy, productive calving season may want to consider testing their forage supplies to ensure the feed is of high nutritional value, an Ohio State University Extension beef expert said.  Otherwise, feeding poor quality forages to cows in the late gestation or early lactation period can have devastating negative impacts on conception rates in the following breeding season, said John Grimes, beef coordinator for OSU Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.  If producers find they have poor quality forage, they may want to supplement the feed with higher quality corn for those cows, particularly with first-calf heifers, he said...
  10. Bill and Donna Cackler, of Cackler Farms in Delaware, Ohio, check some of the 23,000 Christmas trees actively growing on their property. (Photo courtesy of Cackler Farms)

    Christmas Trees Offer Many Environmental Benefits — And You Can Put a Dollar Sign Next to Them

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- That freshly cut or live Christmas tree standing in your living room provides a host of benefits and value beyond the sheer joy of the holidays -- in the form of environmental services such as cleaner air, reduced energy use and absorption of stormwater runoff. What's even better, you can calculate the dollar value of a Christmas tree's environmental services and property-enhancement benefits, said Jim Chatfield, an Ohio State University Extension horticulture specialist based in Wooster. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of Ohio State's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. The National Tree Benefit Calculator (online at http://www.treebenefits.com) allows anyone to...

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