News Releases

  1. EcoBot

    100 Students at 4-H Center Oct. 10 for National Eco-Bot Challenge

    Update: To see a video of the Eco-Bot Challenge, click on the video link button below. COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Using inch-long "Eco-Bots" made from the head of a toothbrush, a small vibrating motor and a watch battery, thousands of youths around the nation will devise ways to clean up a simulated toxic spill on Oct. 10 in the "Eco-Bot Challenge," the 2012 experiment selected for this year's National Science Experiment for 4-H National Youth Science Day. The experiment is designed to get the engineering juices flowing among the participants, said Bob Horton, Ohio 4-H specialist who created the challenge. "We're getting them to think like engineers," said Horton, who is a professor and 4-H Extension specialist in STEM (science, technology,...
  2. Image of environmental professionals

    Ohio State Announces New Network for Environmental Professionals

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- “At this point, we have just one planet to share.” So said David Hanselmann, a lecturer in Ohio State University’s School of Environment and Natural Resources, in announcing a new Ohio-based professional network for people whose work helps keep the planet green. The Environmental Professionals Network, which launched on Aug. 7, “is for a broad range of people who are professionally engaged in managing, protecting and using our environment and natural resources -- people who really should be connected but often are not, and sometimes are even at odds,” said Hanselmann, who is the network’s coordinator. Participants will be better able to serve clients, community and society. -- David Hanselmann, Coordinator, Environmental...
  3. water control structure

    Farm Science Review: Water Control Structure Benefits Farmers and Environment

    LONDON, Ohio – A new field drainage technology could help reduce runoff from farm fields and reduce the risk of harmful algae blooms in Lake Erie and other Ohio lakes.  The system, called an Inline Water Level Control Structure, is designed to keep water and nutrients such as nitrates and phosphorus on the land where they can be used by crops, Ohio State University’s Farm Science Review organizers said. Working with the Ohio Land Improvement Contractors Association (OLICA), two new water control structures were installed at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center during Farm Science Review last week. The new installations bring the total number of the systems in use there to eight, said Matt Sullivan, Farm Science Review assistant manager.   He said the Molly...
  4. Sorghum Sundangrass

    OSU Extension: Fall Frost Increases the Potential for Toxicity in Livestock

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – While fall frost is an annual concern for livestock producers because of the potential for prussic acid poisoning, the potential for toxicity in livestock is perhaps of wider concern this year because of the drought that many livestock producers suffered, according to an Ohio State University Extension specialist. The drought of 2012 has been one of the worst on record in Ohio, leaving many livestock producers short on hay and silage supplies. The lack of substantial rainfall, extreme heat and dryness left many producers looking for any alternative forages they can plant to make up for the shortages, said Mark Sulc, an OSU Extension forage specialist. “This year especially with the dry weather, people were looking for ways to grow supplemental forage,...
  5. Sorghum Sundangrass

    OSU Extension: Fall Frost Increases the Potential for Toxicity in Livestock

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – While fall frost is an annual concern for livestock producers because of the potential for prussic acid poisoning, the potential for toxicity in livestock is perhaps of wider concern this year because of the drought that many livestock producers suffered, according to an Ohio State University Extension specialist. The drought of 2012 has been one of the worst on record in Ohio, leaving many livestock producers short on hay and silage supplies. The lack of substantial rainfall, extreme heat and dryness left many producers looking for any alternative forages they can plant to make up for the shortages, said Mark Sulc, an OSU Extension forage specialist. “This year especially with the dry weather, people were looking for ways to grow supplemental forage,...
  6. Sorghum Sundangrass

    How to Test for Prussic Acid Content in Forages

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Fall frost can raise the potential for prussic acid poisoning in livestock. In addition to taking measures to prevent livestock toxicity, producers can also consider testing forage for prussic acid content, according to an Ohio State University Extension specialist. Prussic acid poisoning in livestock is potentially of broader concern this year thanks to drought conditions that left many livestock producers short on hay and silage and looking for alternative forages to plant to make up for the shortages, said Mark Sulc, an OSU Extension forage specialist.  Many chose to grow sudangrass, sudangrass hybrids,forage sorghums or sorghum-sudangrass crosses,which are capable of becoming toxic to livestock after a frost event, Sulc said.  Producers can...
  7. Stan Gehrt, a wildlife ecologist at Ohio State University, inspects a coyote captured in the greater Chicago area as part of a long-running study on this increasingly common urban resident. (Photo courtesy of Stan Gehrt.)

    Urban Coyotes Never Stray: Study Finds 100 Percent Monogamy

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Coyotes living in cities don’t ever stray from their mates, and stay with each other till death do them part, according to a new study. The finding sheds light on why the North American cousin of the dog and wolf, which is originally native to deserts and plains, is thriving today in urban areas. Scientists with Ohio State University who genetically sampled 236 coyotes in the Chicago area over a six-year period found no evidence of polygamy -- of the animals having more than one mate -- nor of one mate ever leaving another while the other was still alive. This was even though the coyotes exist in high population densities and have plenty of food to eat, which are conditions that often lead other dog family members, such as some fox species, to stray from their...
  8. U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown (right), a member of the Senate's agriculture committee, made a stop at Farm Science Review on Tuesday. With him are CFAES retiring dean Bobby Moser (left) and new dean Bruce McPheron. (Photo by Ken Chamberlain)

    Crop Insurance, Risk Management to Shape Next Farm Bill

    LONDON, Ohio -- The soaring cost of crop insurance and the move away from direct payments to farmers in favor of risk-management measures will shape the future of the Farm Bill, according to Ohio State University agricultural economists who shared their perspectives with farmers and other attendees Sept. 18 on the inaugural day of the 50th Farm Science Review in London, Ohio. The panel featured farm policy expert Carl Zulauf and international trade and policy specialist Ian Sheldon, both from the university's Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics. They were joined by Katharine Ferguson, legislative aide to U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown, who is a member of the agriculture committee. Matt Roberts, who specializes in risk management and commodity...
  9. Ohio State's food-production system is located in the Deep Space Habitat's plant atrium area.

    Space Gardening? Ohio State Creates Food-production System for Future NASA Missions

    System is being tested Sept. 10-21 at Johnson Space Center in Houston. WOOSTER, Ohio -- Say you are on Mars and fancy a salad. Unless the Curiosity rover can make an unexpected find of fresh romaine somewhere on the dusty Red Planet, you are looking at a nine-month trip to the nearest produce aisle on Earth. A better option? Grow the salad yourself. That's exactly the approach NASA is taking as it plans for future manned expeditions to places like the moon or Mars, where food availability will be a significant challenge. Joining this mission is a team of Ohio State University researchers and students who are helping NASA figure out the best way to grow food aboard space exploration units. The team, from the university'...
  10. Destroyed Ag Engineering building after the tornado.

    $6M Announced for Reconstruction of Tornado-stricken Building on Ohio State's Wooster Campus

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- The state of Ohio's Office of Budget and Management has allocated $6 million in emergency funds to assist with the reconstruction of a building at Ohio State University's Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), which was severely damaged as a result of a Sept. 16, 2010, tornado that struck the Wooster campus.   The announcement was made Aug. 29 by State Rep. Ron Amstutz during a meeting of Ohio State's Board of Trustees at OARDC. Amstutz, whose 3rd House District includes Wooster and who chairs the Ohio House of Representatives’ Finance and Appropriations Committee, has been a strong supporter of OARDC over his three decades of service in the Ohio...

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