News Releases

  1. OARDC Poster competition

    Top 12: OARDC Names 2013 Research Poster Winners

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- The Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) has announced the winners of its annual research poster competition, which took place yesterday (4/25) during the center’s 2013 annual research conference in Columbus. The competition honors outstanding posters -- displays detailing research projects -- by OARDC-supported Ph.D. and master’s degree students, postdoctoral researchers, and research assistants and associates. OARDC is the research arm of Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Ph.D. Students First place: Nicholas Teets, Entomology, “Calcium Signaling Mediates Cold-sensing in Insect Tissues”; David Denlinger, adviser. Second place: Fabiola Gutierrez Orozco,...
  2. Krauss Award winner

    How Antarctica’s Only Native Insect Survives: Ohio State Grad Nets Honor

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Nicholas Teets, who in fall 2012 earned his Ph.D. in entomology from Ohio State University, yesterday (4/25) received the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center’s (OARDC) William E. Krauss Director’s Award for Excellence in Graduate Research. The award honors the best published paper by an OARDC-supported doctoral student. OARDC is the research arm of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Teets co-wrote “Gene Expression Changes Governing Extreme Dehydration Tolerance in an Antarctic Insect,” which appeared in PNAS, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, in December 2012. The journal, according to its website, is one of the world’s most-cited multidisciplinary...
  3. LeJeune and Medeiros image

    Scientists Strive to Find How to Make Food Safety Messages Stick

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- Every year, an estimated one in six Americans gets sick from foodborne illness. Three thousand of them die. Those statistics are frustrating for Lydia Medeiros and Jeff LeJeune. The researchers are among a half-dozen go-to experts on food safety at Ohio State University. They've dedicated their careers to learning about disease-causing pathogens and getting the word out to let people know how they can protect themselves. But telling people what to do is quite different than people actually doing it. "Apparently, beating people over the head with data doesn't work," said LeJeune, a microbiologist with Ohio State's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. That's why these educators are studying techniques from the fields of...
  4. boxing up food donations

    Kids Feed Kids at Ohio State’s Scarlet and Gray Ag Day

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- The West Ohio Food Bank, Ridgemont FFA, and Peace Corp volunteers and international students recently partnered to teach fourth- and fifth-grade students at the 2013 Micki Zartman Scarlet and Gray Ag Day about poverty and hunger on local and global scales.  Scarlet and Gray Ag Day is an annual educational event that this year hosted 385 elementary students from Franklin and Delaware counties. It was held April 19 on Ohio State University's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences campus. The 30-minute hands-on session, “Kids Feeding Kids,” asked students what role they would play in meeting the future demands of feeding the world as the world’s population reaches 9 billion by 2050. Students participated in a hunger awareness...
  5. MPHM courses are taught by Ohio State's internationally recognized experts in plant health management. (Photo by Ken Chamberlain)

    First at Ohio State: Master's in Plant Health Management Receives Professional Certification

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- The professional Master in Plant Health Management (MPHM) degree, developed by Ohio State University's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), has become the first graduate program at the university to achieve affiliation in the National Professional Science Master's Association. The first of its kind at Ohio State, the degree is a joint effort of the departments of plant pathology and entomology whose aim is to provide hands-on training that includes both technical and professional aspects of plant health management, as the need for qualified individuals in the field increases. The demand is huge and growing for students and people trained in plant...
  6. Chow Line logo

    Chow Line: Try new greens for your salad

    I always used to use romaine lettuce for salads, but recently I switched to a spring mix and I love it. What can you tell me about other types of greens for fresh salads? This is a great time of year to start exploring a wider variety of fresh greens. If you’re adventurous, you can even plant a few varieties and grow your own -- leafy greens are cool-season crops and thrive in early and mid-spring. But even if you’re not interested in developing a green thumb, exploring new types of lettuce can add variety and interest to your salads. Iceberg lettuce is still the most widely available and most popular type of lettuce. It’s not hard to see why: It tends to last longer in the refrigerator than other types of lettuce, and adds a good crunch to the salad bowl. But it has...
  7. Yebo Li

    Ohio State Scientist Recognized for Bioproduct, Bioenergy Breakthroughs

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ohio State University scientist Yebo Li, who works to develop new sustainable bioproduct and bioenergy sources, yesterday (4/25) received the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center’s (OARDC) Junior Faculty Research Award. The award honors outstanding achievements by an OARDC faculty member at the rank of assistant or associate professor. OARDC is the research arm of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Li, who is an associate professor in CFAES’s Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, leads OARDC’s Wooster-based Bioproducts and Bioenergy Research Laboratory, which focuses on biomass, biofuels, biopolymers, anaerobic digestion and algae-based biofuels. Video (1:...
  8. Guo-Liang Wang

    Disease Defense: Ohio State Scientist Honored for Helping Keep World's Rice Safe

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Guo-Liang Wang, an Ohio State University scientist who is an international expert on the molecular genetics of host-plant resistance to plant diseases, especially in rice, yesterday (4/25) won the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center’s (OARDC) Senior Faculty Research Award. The award honors outstanding achievements by an OARDC faculty member at the rank of professor. OARDC is the research arm of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Wang, who is a professor in CFAES’s Department of Plant Pathology, has successfully cloned genes for disease resistance in rice, which is a staple food for more than half the world’s population. The genes, which help reduce yield losses to such major rice...
  9. FDA logo

    FDA in Ohio April 30 to Discuss Proposed Rules to Reduce Produce-Related Foodborne Illness

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- Produce growers and other interested parties from across Ohio will attend a listening session April 30 about the Food and Drug Administration's proposed new food safety rules for produce. "We encourage people to to register in advance, but walk-ins are welcome," said Ashley Kulhanek, an educator with Ohio State University Extension, which is the outreach arm of Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). In addition to growers who may be concerned about how the new rules will affect their farm operations, the session will be of interest to grocery store buyers and other wholesale buyers of fruits and vegetables, and anyone interested in farm practices that can decrease the risk of foodborne illness from...
  10. Feral swine

    Ohio’s Invasive Species: May 17 Workshop for Natural Resource Professionals

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Professionals who manage parks, farms, trees, wildlife, landscape plants and more can get a detailed look at Ohio’s invasive species -- both what has arrived and what may be coming -- at a workshop May 17. Called “Ohio’s Non-native Invasives,” the event goes from 8:15 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Founder’s Auditorium in Ovalwood Hall on Ohio State University’s Mansfield campus, 1760 University Drive. The program features 14 sessions on topics such as feral pigs; emerald ash borer; Asian longhorned beetle; white-nose syndrome in bats; new Asian carp species, especially the silver carp and the bighead carp; and new threats to hemlocks, walnuts and viburnums. Mississippi State University forester Andy Londo will give the keynote talk on the fast-...

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