News Releases

  1. Wind turbine and solar panels at the Great Lakes Science Center in Cleveland.

    Cleveland, Similar Cities Could Produce Most of Their Energy: Ohio State Study

      Increased urban energy self-reliance would add between $28.7 million and $1.76 billion to Cleveland's economy annually. WOOSTER, Ohio -- Cleveland and similar North American cities have the potential to generate up to 100 percent of their current energy needs, retaining millions of dollars in the local economy, creating new jobs and spurring additional environmental benefits.   Those are some of the findings of a study conducted by Parwinder Grewal, director of the Center for Urban Environment and Economic Development at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) -- the research arm of Ohio State University's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental...
  2. Wayne County Farmers Dan and Randy Bower examine drought-impacted corn

    Post 2012 Election: Farm Bill and the Fiscal Cliff

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – With the election of 2012 over, it may be a good thing that the forthcoming debate over the so-called fiscal cliff of automatic budget cuts and tax increases coincides with the ongoing debate over the farm bill, an Ohio State University farm policy expert said. The debate over the 2012 Farm Bill involves many aspects of the broader policy discussions currently occurring in the U.S., said Carl Zulauf, who is also a professor in Ohio State’s Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics.  In a paper written the day after the election, Zulauf said that while it is risky to simplify the policy environment in any country as large and diverse as the U.S., “many issues confronting the U.S. at present can be viewed as...
  3. Students access healthy foods at school thanks to Farm to School program

    Ohio State to Host Statewide Farm to School Conference March 2013

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – More than 250 farmers, producers, educators, school food service professionals, business leaders and Ohio State University Extension experts are expected to attend a statewide conference on the Farm to School program, with a goal to continue to get more fresh, locally grown and produced foods into more school cafeterias. OSU Extension will host the Farm to School conference March 13, 2013, as part of an effort to continue to expand the successful program, which works to increase students’ access to healthy foods and to help them learn more about food, health, nutrition and agriculture.  Farm to School is a national program, which in Ohio is led by OSU Extension and is supported by numerous agencies, foundations and industry organizations. OSU...
  4. Chow Line: Tips to prevent holiday weight gain

    I need some inspiration to help keep me from gaining weight during the holidays. Any ideas? The temptations of the season often come not with glitter and sparkle, but with sugar, fat and calories. Fortunately, weight gain isn’t inevitable. In fact, most studies suggest an average weight gain over the holidays of about 1 pound. This is good news, because most people assume it is five or 10 times that number. Still, researchers warn that people tend to keep that extra pound instead of shedding it after the season is over. Those pounds can pile up over time, leading to significant weight gain. Studies also indicate that people who are already overweight are more likely to gain five pounds or more during the holidays. Perhaps the first thing to acknowledge is that this won’t...
  5. Kopp, Mancl, at bioreactor site

    First-of-its-kind Wastewater Treatment System Saves Turkey Processor Millions, Protects Environment

    HARRISON, Ohio -- A southwestern Ohio turkey processing plant has much to be thankful for this season. Whitewater Processing Co. slaughters and processes 6,000 to 8,000 turkeys on a normal day, producing about 2.5 to 3 million pounds of turkey in an average month. The Kopp family has run the business since the 1930s, and with 110 employees, wanted to stay put. But in the 1990s, environmental concerns about the 145,000 gallons of wastewater it produces each day nearly sunk the business. Today, with a first-of-its-kind treatment system designed by an Ohio State University researcher, the rough waters have calmed. And though the costs have been considerable -- about $1 million to build the wastewater treatment system plus an estimated $1.8 million to operate and maintain it over...
  6. Family Fundamentals: Make plan, be firm to curb holiday spending

    For the month of November 2012 Every year, I spend more money than I want to during the holidays. Can you suggest ways to help me not go overboard this year? Sure. But all the tips and guidance in the world won’t help unless you make a firm commitment to yourself that this year will be different. Just as with any change to long-held habits (think “I’m going to lose weight” or “I’m going to quit smoking”), it will take energy, determination and focus. It won’t just happen simply because you want it to happen. With that in mind, here’s some advice: Estimate what you want to spend overall. Then list categories of what you plan to purchase. Include everything holiday-related: gifts (how many and who you’re buying for);...
  7. image of pine tree and cone

    Ohio State Forestry Students to Hold Christmas Tree Sale Nov. 29-Dec. 2

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Ohio State University’s Forestry Forum, a group for students interested in forestry as a career, will hold its annual public Christmas tree sale from Nov. 29 to Dec. 2 behind the university’s Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, 2201 Fred Taylor Drive, in Columbus. Hours are noon to dark on Nov. 29, 9 a.m. to dark on Nov. 30 and Dec. 1, and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Dec. 2. The trees are fresh cut Ohio-grown Fraser firs, Scotch pines, white pines and blue spruces in heights from 6 to 9 feet. Proceeds from the sale will support scholarships, travel to academic conferences and other activities for students in the group. Buyers can receive a 10 percent discount with a coupon available at http://go.osu.edu/treesale (pdf) that can be printed and brought in or...
  8. chow line logo

    Chow Line: Know warning signs, risk of diabetes

    No one in my family has ever had diabetes. Does that mean I’m not at risk for developing it? Although there is a genetic component to diabetes, it’s not 100 percent: Many people develop type 2 diabetes without having a family history of the disease. Conversely, it’s not guaranteed that you’ll develop the disease even if you have close family members who have it, though your risk is higher. A warning: You may think no one in your family has ever had diabetes, but many cases go undiagnosed. So you may be operating under a false sense of security. Type 2 diabetes accounts for about 95 percent of all diabetes cases. It’s marked by high blood glucose levels primarily caused by the body’s inability to use its insulin efficiently. In contrast, type 1...
  9. image of dairy cow for compost bedded pack workshop

    OARDC to Host Compost Bedded Pack Dairy Barn Workshop on Dec. 5

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- The Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) will host a workshop on compost bedded pack dairy barns on Dec. 5. The same program will be offered in Tennessee on Dec. 12 and in Kentucky on Dec. 13. A compost bedded pack dairy barn is an alternative dairy system with solid manure handling options, said Lingying Zhao, an associate professor of food, agricultural and biological engineering at Ohio State University and one of the event’s organizers and speakers. “There’s increased interest in the compost bedded pack system because of its potential for positive impacts on milk production and cow health and its ability to handle manure as a dry material,” Zhao said. Possible benefits of the system also include less...
  10. BiOWiSH's Bill Diederich, OARDC's Robert Hansen and CropKing's Natalie Bumgarner survey recently transplanted lettuce at an OARDC greenhouse.

    New Bio-fertilizer Can Increase Hydroponic Vegetable Growth: Ohio State Trials

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- A new organic-based fertilizer for commercial hydroponic production can boost lettuce growth by about 13 percent, according to preliminary trials conducted by Ohio State University's Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center(OARDC) in Wooster. The fertilizer, BiOWiSH-Hydroponic, is produced by BiOWiSH Technologies, a Chicago-based manufacturer of natural food production and environmental remediation technologies.  Available in the U.S. market for a little over a year and for two years internationally, the fertilizer is a unique blend of bacteria and biocatalysts that, according to company claims, helps speed up the breakdown of organic matter and potentially impacts plant...

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