News Releases

  1. school garden

    School Gardens Offer Myriad Benefits, Take Planning

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Planting seeds: that's what you can do with a school garden, not only in the ground, but in the minds of young people. "Using the environment as a context for learning is an incredible tool," said Susan Hogan, program assistant for Ohio State University Extension's 4-H Youth Development program. "Gardening at school sites addresses many of the science academic content standards and also increases social and interpersonal skills," Hogan said. "Sometimes, children who have learning difficulties or who are struggling do better when they're learning outdoors.” Hogan, who has experience working in environmental education, joined OSU Extension in December. As spring approached, she began getting more inquiries from area schools for...
  2. food pantry shelves

    Project Focuses on Improving Food Pantries in Rural Food Deserts

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Ohio State University Extension is taking part in a five-year, $4 million grant to help isolated communities increase availability of nutritious foods. "We're focusing on areas defined as 'rural food deserts' as defined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture," said Dan Remley, field specialist in food, nutrition and wellness for OSU Extension and Ohio's representative on the project's team. "These are low-income census tracts where a substantial number or share of people are far from supermarkets, generally in the southern and eastern parts of the state." The project, called "Voices for Food," is being led by South Dakota State University and also includes land-grant university researchers in Indiana, Michigan, Missouri...
  3. Threat of Corn Flea Beetle Moderate to Severe in Ohio this Spring, Slightly Higher Potential for Stewart’s Bacterial Wilt

    WOOSTER, Ohio – Growers scouting their fields this spring should be on the lookout for corn flea beetle as the relatively mild winter Ohio has experienced this year is expected to cause a moderate to severe infestation of the pest, an Ohio State University Extension entomologist said.  Corn flea beetle, which targets corn through the spread of the bacterium that causes Stewart's bacterial wilt and leaf blight on both field and sweet corn, will likely be seen throughout much of the state this year, said Ron Hammond, who also has an appointment with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.  Adult beetles that overwinter become active in the spring when the soil temperature reaches 65 degrees, and are most active on sunny, warm, windless days. ...
  4. Workshop Offers Producers Tips to Expand Sales Using ‘Maps and Apps’

    PIKETON, Ohio – Is your food business on the map? The mobile map, that is. Ohio food producers wanting to increase their markets, grow their customer base, improve profitability and increase visibility can learn strategies on how to leverage mobile media marketing during a workshop offered by Ohio State University Extension. The “Maps and Apps” workshop April 24 will teach participants how to make the most of mobile media marketing as a way their businesses can benefit from free listings on Internet maps, GPS systems and mobile apps, said Julie Fox, direct marketing specialist with the Ohio State University South Centers, the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center and OSU Extension.   OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms,...
  5. OSU Extension to Offer Webinar April 9 on Farmland Drainage

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Understanding what drainage system works best on what type of farmland can help growers significantly improve yields as well as soil and water quality, an Ohio State University Extension expert said. Using the right drainage system on a corn crop, for example, can increase yields by some 30 percent, said Bruce Clevenger, an OSU Extension educator. OSU Extension is the statewide outreach arm of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. “The Midwest is dominated by the use of agricultural drainage because our soils tend to be very wet throughout the region,” he said. “We typically have wet periods throughout the growing season in which excess water can damage yields and prevent us from planting in a...
  6. Chow Line: Keep hard-boiled eggs refrigerated

    When I was little, my parents hid my Easter basket before they went to bed so I could hunt for it Easter morning. The basket always contained at least one hard-boiled egg. Now we’re told we shouldn’t leave hard-boiled eggs out overnight. There was never a problem before. Why the change? First, let’s be clear: It’s never been a good idea to keep any perishable food out at room temperature for more than two hours. You can count yourself lucky that you never got sick eating those eggs. Or, it’s possible you did get sick and never associated the illness with Easter eggs. Some types of foodborne illness take days to develop. You might have mistakenly associated an illness with something you had eaten more recently, or even to a flu bug. In any case, please set...
  7. quasar energy group's digester provides the OARDC campus with 30 percent of its electricity. (Photo by Ken Chamberlain)

    Going to Waste: Ohio State Wooster Campus Gets 30% of Its Electricity from Refuse-generated Biogas

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- Rotten produce. Animal fat. Bad soda. Manure. The Wooster campus of Ohio State University's Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) is slowly going to waste. And that's a good thing. OARDC is using those and many other agricultural and food-processing wastes to meet close to one-third of the 12-megawatt-hour annual electricity needs of its main campus. That’s 3.6 MWh of green energy, enough to power 313 average U.S. homes, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Many U.S. colleges and universities are turning to renewable energy sources to meet all or some of their power needs, as part of a growing trend that also involves the implementation of additional...
  8. Adult supervision of children handling young poultry is important for both human health and animal well-being. (Photo by Ken Chamberlain)

    Easter Birds and Kids: Children at Higher Risk of Salmonella Infection from Chicks, Ducklings

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- Chicks and ducklings may be cute and cuddly, but parents thinking about getting these critters for their kids for Easter should consider this ugly-duckling fact: they could carry Salmonella infection, an illness that is particularly dangerous to young children. Jeff LeJeune, an Ohio State University microbiologist and head of the Food Animal Health Research Program(FAHRP), said parents and other caretakers need to be aware of the risks associated with handling young poultry or fowl and make sure everyone in the household follows the appropriate measures to avoid bacterial infection. Those measures include avoiding contact with feces; keeping birds away from areas where food is stored, prepared or eaten...
  9. Family Fundamentals: Protect yourself from identity theft

    A friend is dealing with the aftereffects of identity theft. Is there anything I can do to protect myself from that type of thing? Unfortunately, reports of identity theft are surging these days. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) recently noted that 369,132 cases were reported in 2012, up from 279,226 in 2011 -- an increase of 32 percent. Everyone should take steps to protect themselves from identity theft. The ideas below are from the FTC at http://bit.ly/idprot and from eXtension, a clearinghouse of research-based information from the nation’s land-grant universities, at http://bit.ly/reduceIDrisk. You can find even more strategies at those sites, but here are some basics: At home, keep your financial documents and records locked in a safe place. That’s especially...
  10. Mushroom handbook cover

    New Book Available Just in Time for Mushroom Season

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- There’s a new book available for Midwestern mushroom hunters, whose season starts in earnest in spring. Mushrooms and Macrofungi of Ohio and the Midwestern States describes more than 140 mushrooms, including both edible and poisonous types, that a person may find in woods and fields. It features high-resolution color photographs and 23 color-coded groups for identification. Macrofungi are fungi that can be seen with the unaided eye. They include mushrooms, stinkhorns, polypores and slime molds. The book’s authors are a virtual who’s who of regional mushroom experts: Landon Rhodes, associate professor emeritus in Ohio State University’s Department of Plant Pathology. Britt Bunyard, publisher and editor-in-chief of Fungi Magazine...

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