News Releases

  1. Chow Line: Know how many calories you need

    I always thought almost everyone should eat about 2,000 calories a day, because that’s what is listed on Nutrition Facts labels. But my doctor told me almost no one should eat 2,000 calories a day. Can you clarify this? The number of calories you should consume each day is personalized, as much as it can be, according to your age, your sex and your activity level. Calorie recommendations for adults range from a low of 1,600 calories a day for sedentary women 51 or older, to a high of 3,000 calories a day for active men from 19 to 35. Even though the standard of 2,000 calories a day is appropriate for only a few groups — including sedentary men who are 61 or older and moderately active women between 31 and 50 — it’s not a bad standard to base Nutrition Facts...
  2. Miscanthus is one of the bioenergy crops that will be discussed during the workshop.

    Energy Farming? Bioenergy Crops Workshop Set for April 8 in Piketon

    PIKETON, Ohio -- Opportunities for growing bioenergy crops in Ohio, energy policies that impact this activity and potential markets for biomass are the topics that will be covered at a workshop taking place April 8 from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Ohio State University's South Centers at Piketon. Registration for the event is $10 and includes breakfast and hot lunch. To register, call 740-289-2071 (ext. 132) or 800-297-2072 (ext. 132), or e-mail mcglothin.4@osu.edu. The workshop is limited to the first 125 registrants. "The workshop will review a bioenergy case study from Ashtabula County, provide insight on bioenergy crop opportunities from researchers at Ohio State University and Michigan State...
  3. Ag Degrees in Demand: Ohio State University Agricultural Graduates Report Positive Job Outlook

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – By New Year’s Day this year, graduating senior Linsey Howell already had five job offers. Although the 21-year-old double major in agribusiness and applied economics in Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) won’t receive her degree until graduation day May 5, Howell already has a start date for her new job working in grain merchandising for The Andersons: June 3. “Thanks to the degrees I’m earning from Ohio State and the internships I’ve had, I was able to take the time to really consider the job offers and decide which one would be the best fit for me and what I want to do in my professional career,” the Danville, Ohio native said. “There are a lot of companies...
  4. Ohio State University Extension Releases Four New Guides for Growers

      COLUMBUS, Ohio – Ohio State University Extension has released four new publications that producers and consumers may find helpful. The publications -- on commercial vegetable production, Midwest tree fruit spraying, commercial small fruit and grape spraying, and controlling weeds in Ohio and Indiana -- offer insight into practical issues as spring approaches and growers are getting ready for the upcoming planting season, said Celeste Welty, an OSU Extension Entomologist and an associate professor of entomology. OSU Extension and Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) fruit and vegetable specialists are contributors to the new guides, ensuring that the information within the publications reflects current recommendations applicable to Ohio farming...
  5. OSU Extension Offers Financial Affairs Webinar March 27

      COLUMBUS, Ohio – Homeowners, small business owners, farmers and consumers looking to get a better grasp on their financial bottom lines can get tips in a free webinar March 27 on financial affairs offered by experts from Ohio State University’s Income Tax School Program of Ohio State University Extension. The webinar, “Getting Your Financial Affairs in Order,” can help participants better understand their financial situation by learning how to develop a year-end balance sheet, said Chris Bruynis, an OSU Extension educator. OSU Extension is the statewide outreach arm of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.  “The webinar teaches participants how to examine their assets and liabilities in order...
  6. OSU Extension to Offer Webinar March 18 on ACRE and DCP Programs

        COLUMBUS, Ohio – Growers deciding whether to enroll in the Average Crop Revenue Election (ACRE) program or the Direct and Counter-Cyclical Program (DCP) may want to wait until as close to the June sign-up deadline as they can in order to make the most informed decision on which, if either, program can best impact their financial bottom line, an Ohio State University Extension expert said. By the June 3 sign-up deadline for the ACRE program, North American and European corn planting progress, global wheat conditions, and data on soybean crop size should be available to growers, which can better help them make a decision that best suits their individual financial needs, said Chris Bruynis, an OSU Extension educator.  OSU Extension is the statewide...
  7. Chow Line: Paleo diet has pros and cons

    A lot of my friends seem to be trying the Paleo diet these days. Is the diet safe and sound? Most mainstream nutritionists hesitate giving their stamp of approval to any diet that eliminates entire food groups from the menu, and that’s what this diet does. But it can offer some benefits. For anyone who has been, well, living in a cave since this diet debuted, here are the basics: The Paleolithic diet, which also goes by names like the Caveman diet or the Stone Age diet, purports that the human body is programmed to respond well to a diet much like the one eaten by our hunter-gatherer ancestors. Details vary among proponents, but, for the most part, “in” foods include fresh meat, fish and shellfish, poultry, eggs, fats (including lard), vegetables (some versions allow...
  8. Bighead carp closeup

    Fighting Ohio's Invasive Species: 'Everyone Can Be Part of the Battle'

    Editor: National Invasive Species Awareness Week is March 3-8. COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Kathy Smith says not every bush, beetle, fish or fungus that lives in Ohio belongs there. And she wants you to know it. And pitch in. And give them the boot. As forestry program director for Ohio State University Extension, the statewide outreach arm of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), she’s part of a statewide coalition recognizing National Invasive Species Awareness Week from March 3 to 8. “We’re trying to open people’s eyes to what’s going on in the environment around them so hopefully they’ll take action, whether by removing invasive species on their own land, reporting a sighting, joining a volunteer group or just...
  9. Ohio Vegetable Production Guide Updated and Merged with New Regional Guide

      COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Ohio State University Extension's Ohio Vegetable Production Guide (Bulletin 672) has been discontinued but most of its content, including cultural, varietal, and pesticide recommendations, have been merged with an existing regional publication, an OSU Extension specialist said. The Midwest Vegetable Production Guide (Bulletin 948 for Ohio) is a regional publication involving seven states, including Ohio, published by Purdue University Extension. OSU Extension and Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) vegetable specialists are contributors to the new guide, ensuring the information within the document will reflect current recommendations applicable to Ohio farming operations, said Jim Jasinski, an OSU Extension educator and Integrated Pest...
  10. Closeup of Asian longhorned beetle

    Ohio Invasive Species Profile: Asian Longhorned Beetle

    Editor: National Invasive Species Awareness Week is March 3-8. COLUMBUS, Ohio — As part of National Invasive Species Awareness Week March 3-8, here are some facts and figures on the Asian longhorned beetle, one of Ohio’s newest invasive species: What it is: Big, shiny-black beetle with white spots. Has very long antennae, hence its name, which are black with white stripes. Its body is about the size of an almond. Total length, with antennae extended, can be nearly as long as a finger. Where it’s from: Japan, Korea, southern China. What it does: Adult females lay their eggs in the bark of many kinds of hardwood trees, including maple, horsechestnut, buckeye, poplar, willow, elm, birch, London plane tree, sycamore and others. (Both healthy and stressed trees may...

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