News Releases

  1. no-till beans

    March 14 Workshop: Use Cover Crops to Improve Soil Health, Yields

      TIFFIN, Ohio – Growers who want to improve soil health and increase yields may want to consider using cover crops such as oilseed radish, cereal rye, cowpea or Austrian winter pea, which have also been proven to lower input costs, an Ohio State University Extension expert said. Jim Hoorman, an OSU Extension educator and an assistant professor studying cover crops and water quality issues, will hold a workshop, “Using Cover Crops to Improve Soil Health,” on March 14 to discuss cover crops and ECO Farming, or "ecological farming," a method that is growing in popularity among farmers because of its success in increasing yields, he said. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. “ECO Farming...
  2. Closeup of emerald ash borer

    Ohio Groups Recognizing National Invasive Species Awareness Week March 3-8

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- A statewide coalition of natural resource-related groups is recognizing National Invasive Species Awareness Week from March 3 to 8. The National Invasive Species Council, which is sponsoring the week, said invasive species “cause a multibillion-dollar annual drain on our nation’s economy.” The Convention on Biological Diversity calls invasive species the second biggest threat to the world’s biodiversity after habitat loss. “A lot of (the week) is about early detection,” said Avraham Eitam, pest survey specialist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), one of the sponsors of the week’s observance in Ohio. “If we can get people to be more aware of invasive species...
  3. President Gee 'Greatly Valued 4-H Experience'

    Editor: March 3-9, 2013, is Ohio 4-H Week. COLUMBUS, Ohio -- When he was about 8 years old growing up in the small town of Vernal, Utah, E. Gordon Gee joined 4-H, the youth development program of the nation's land-grant universities and Cooperative Extension System. Now president of The Ohio State University, overseeing six campuses, 65,000 students and 42,000 faculty and staff, Gee is among the most highly experienced, respected and recognized leaders in higher education. And he gives credit to 4-H for helping set him on his successful path. "I greatly valued my 4-H experience," Gee said. "I believe 4-H first instilled in me the value of community, and it also provided some of my earliest opportunities to work with peers as part of a team."  ...
  4. MarketReady Workshops Offer Producers Tips to Improve Profitability, Expand Sales

      PIKETON, Ohio -- Ohio food producers wanting to learn how to increase their markets, develop better relationships with buyers or improve profitability can learn strategies and tips on how to do so and more during two MarketReady training workshops March 19 in Columbus and March 26 in Peninsula, Ohio. The MarketReady program is designed to help food producers learn what is needed to enter various direct marketing channels, how producers can capitalize on emerging trends and how producers can manage market development risks, said Julie Fox, direct marketing specialist with OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms, respectively, of Ohio State's College of Food, Agricultural, and...
  5. Ohio State University to Host Statewide Farm to School Conference March 13: Salad Bar to be Donated to Local School Chosen During Event

      COLUMBUS, Ohio – A salad bar will be up for grabs during the Farm to School conference hosted by Ohio State University Extension March 13, thanks to a donation from Whole Foods Market that will allow a local school to set up the salad bar in its school cafeteria, organizers said. OSU Extension, with the support of the Ohio departments of Education, Health and Agriculture, will host the Farm to School conference as part of its goal to expand the successful program, which works to increase students’ access to healthy foods and to help them learn more about food, health, nutrition and agriculture, said Julie Fox, director of the Ohio Farm to School program.  The salad bar package will be presented to a local school chosen from among conference attendees, Fox...
  6. Chow Line: What to do about mold on cheese

    We had a nice weekend getaway a while back and brought home some artisan cheese we found in a local shop. Today I saw some mold on it. Can I just cut the mold away or is the whole block of cheese unsafe? It sounds like the cheese you’re talking about is a hard cheese (not something soft, like cream cheese). If that’s the case, you likely can still look forward to enjoying it. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service has a detailed fact sheet on mold online at http://bit.ly/moldonfood. Scroll down to the end and you’ll find a chart that lists all sorts of foods and what to do if you find mold on them. Fortunately, mold spores generally can’t penetrate deeply into hard cheese. So, just cut the mold off, at least one inch around...
  7. Jeff LeJeune

    New Food Animal Health Director: Collaboration is Key

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- Jeff LeJeune knows the value of collaboration. The newly appointed director of Ohio State University's Food Animal Health Research Program (FAHRP) has teamed up on research and other projects with faculty from across the university since his arrival in Wooster in 2001. FAHRP is housed on the Wooster campus of the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, the research arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. LeJeune took the reins as director on Feb. 1. Like his predecessor, Mo Saif, LeJeune is now also assistant dean in the College of Veterinary Medicine. Trained as a veterinarian and a microbiologist, LeJeune is now leading a team of about 75 faculty, staff and students focused on the health of food-producing animals. "...
  8. Mo Saif retired after almost 50 years of research and administrative service to OARDC. (Photo by Ken Chamberlain)

    Retired Ohio State Virologist 'A True Hero for Science, Agriculture'

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- When the topic of poultry diseases or the science behind the transmission of influenza viruses between animal species is discussed anywhere in the world, odds are the name of Mo Saif will come up in those discussions. And there's also a good chance those doing the talking have been impacted by his work or his mentoring. The head of the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center’s (OARDC) Food Animal Health Research Program (FAHRP) since 1993, Saif retired early this year, following an illustrious career of more than 50 years in both Egypt and the United States. OARDC is the research arm of Ohio State University's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences....
  9. OSU Extension to Offer Tax Webinar March 13, April 12 to Update Landowners on Tax Implications of Oil and Gas Leases

      COLUMBUS, Ohio – Ohio State University Extension will host two Oil and Gas Lease/Royalties Webinars March 13 and April 12 to help landowners understand the financial implications and tax laws associated with oil and gas leases, organizers said.  Each two-hour program will offer updates on the tax changes in oil and gas leases stemming from the shale energy boom in Ohio, said David Marrison, an OSU Extension educator. OSU Extension is the statewide outreach arm of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.  The program will offer information to help landowners understand how the Internal Revenue Service handles oil and gas payments, among other issues, said Marrison, who will present the webinars and also works with...
  10. CTC Conference Offers Corn Growers Insight into Conventional and Drought-tolerant Hybrids during ‘Corn University’

    ADA, Ohio – Corn growers thinking about planting decisions for the 2013 season and debating whether to use drought-tolerant hybrids or conventional hybrids may want to consider how drought-resistant hybrids respond to typical growing conditions as well as in drought-stressed conditions, an Ohio State University Extension expert said.   While new drought-tolerant corn hybrids are marketed to provide a margin of protection in drought-stressed conditions as well as non-drought-stressed conditions, growers can benefit from gaining more perspective on the issue, considering that Ohio in a typical year can experience stress from extreme cold, extreme rain or extreme drought, said Peter Thomison, an OSU Extension agronomist.  Such decisions are crucial as growers prepare...

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