News Releases

  1. Chow Line: Use Nutrition Month to get back on track

    I know National Nutrition Month is coming up in March, and I want to use the occasion to jump-start my resolution to eat better this year. But I’ve done this kind of thing before and I’m out of new ideas. Where can I find some good ones? This is a great plan. It’s not unusual for New Year’s resolutions to wane by now. But using National Nutrition Month to revive your resolve is a shrewd move: There will likely be an abundance of nutrition-related information out there for the taking, and you’re bound to find new ways to get back on track. You can take the bull by the horns and search out ideas yourself. A great place to start is the website of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetic Association). As the sponsor of National...
  2. Bees are key to both our food crops and ecological health.

    The Power of Pollinators: Short Course Addresses Threats to Bees March 14-15 in Wooster

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- Farmers, gardeners, beekeepers, naturalists and others with an interest in bees are invited to attend The Power of Pollinators Short Course, a workshop organized by Ohio State University's Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). The event will be held March 14-15 on OARDC's Wooster campus. "We depend on bee pollinators for much of what we eat and drink, and bees are also essential to ecological health," said Denise Ellsworth, director of the Honey Bee and Native Pollinator Education Program at OARDC's Department of Entomology. "Worldwide, bees are threatened due to habitat loss, pests, pesticides, climate change and more," she said. "This two-...
  3. Image of Chadwick Arboretum north location

    Ohio State Food, Ag, Env Calendar Listings as of Feb. 21

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Here are upcoming events involving Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences as of Feb. 21: February Feb. 22: Discount mail-in registration deadline for Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference March 5-6 in Ada. Registration is $85 for full conference, $65 for one day, for mail-registration postmarked by Feb. 22. Registration is $105 for full conference, $80 for one day, after that date. Discount online registration also available through Feb. 27. Information: http://ctc.osu.edu or 614-292-6648. NEW: Feb. 23: Pancake Breakfast and Winter Walk, 8:30-10 a.m., Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, Chadwick Arboretum and Learning Gardens (Arboretum North location), Ohio State University,...
  4. NIH image of novel coronavirus

    Media Advisory: Ohio State Scientist Available for Comment on New SARS-like Virus

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- A scientist at Ohio State University's Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center can offer insight into a new coronavirus that is being blamed for 12 illnesses and five deaths internationally over the past 10 months, and which appears to begin to be spreading, but with limited person-to-person spread. Linda Saif is known nationally and internationally for her work on enteric viruses, including coronaviruses, which affect both food-producing animals and humans. Saif is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a Distinguished University Professor in the Food Animal Health Research Program on OARDC's Wooster campus. OARDC is the research arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Coronavirus family members include the...
  5. Image of mixed lettuce

    Fresh Produce Safety Training Set for Portage, Stark, Cuyahoga Counties

    WOOSTER, Ohio – Ohio State University’s Fruit and Vegetable Safety Team will hold workshops on Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) for fresh produce growers in three locations over the next three months. All three workshops will focus on preventing microbial contamination on fruit and vegetable farms. The workshop presenters are all specialists from Ohio State University Extension, which is the outreach arm of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Feb. 27: 1-4 p.m. in OSU Extension’s Portage County office meeting room, 6970 State Route 88, Ravenna. Co-sponsored by Downtown Ravenna Farmers Market. $10. Registration deadline Feb. 25. Information: Heather Neikirk, neikirk.2@osu.edu or 330-296-6432. March 22:...
  6. Witch-hazel in snow

    Winter Walk, Pruning Workshop Ahead in Secrest Arboretum

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- Secrest Arboretum, part of the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), 1680 Madison Ave. in Wooster, will hold the following public events from late winter through spring: Feb. 25: Guided Winter Walk, 2-3 p.m., meet at the Seaman Orientation Plaza. Features witch-hazel, Lenten rose, conifers, native grasses, parrotia, and other seasonal highlights. Led by arboretum research assistant Paul Snyder. Free. For more information, contact him at snyder.1062@osu.edu. March 20: Dormant Pruning Workshop, 8 a.m. to noon, Seaman Orientation Plaza. Offers expert instruction on how to prune young trees and shrubs, including hands-on practice in the field. Designed for anyone who takes care of outdoor plants, from homeowners to commercial landscapers....
  7. family fundamentals logo

    Family Fundamentals: Retiring? Talk with spouse about concerns

    I’m about to retire, and my husband retired two years ago. Although we have a great relationship, I’m a little concerned about being together 24/7. What advice do you have for us so we don’t get on each other’s nerves? Since you describe your marriage as a strong one, the good news is you already have a great head start. Some of the research on marital relationships has found that retirement tends to magnify the relationship already in place: happy couples who share common interests tend to have a positive experience after retirement, while couples who are already dissatisfied with their marriage tend to experience additional problems. Still, this will be a big change for both you and your husband. It’s likely he has established some routines at home while...
  8. Overholt Drainage School Offers Soil and Water Management Education March 11-15

      COLUMBUS, Ohio – Ohio growers can increase yields by some 20 to 35 percent for rotation corn with proper subsurface drainage, according to research from Ohio State University's Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center conducted at the Northwest Agricultural Research Station in Hoytville. And overall average yield can increase up to 6 percent for corn and 3.5 percent for soybeans with controlled drainage, according to research conducted on demonstration farms in northwest Ohio, said Larry Brown, an agricultural engineer with joint appointments with Ohio State University Extension and OARDC. OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms, respectively, of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). “...
  9. Ohio Commercial Berry Production School is March 14

      PIKETON, Ohio – Berry growers looking for ways to diversify their farming operations can learn the practical and essential skills needed to be successful in the blueberry, blackberry, raspberry and strawberry industries at a workshop held by Ohio State University horticulture and viticulture experts March 14.  The program is from 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. at the OSU South Centers’ Endeavor Center, 1862 Shyville Road, in Piketon. The workshop is designed to help growers expand their knowledge base to increase their profit potential as well as learn tips to help increase yield, said Gary Gao, an Ohio State University Extension specialist and associate professor of small fruit crops at OSU South Centers. “One of the areas we’ll look at is blueberry,...
  10. Chow Line: Protein guidance can be confusing

    How much protein should I eat every day? Determining how much protein an adult should consume each day might seem confusing. According to the Institute of Medicine, which sets nutrition recommendations, a healthy adult should consume anywhere from 10 to 35 percent of total calories in protein per day. That’s a big range. The average American diet amounts to about 15 percent protein, or about 75 grams a day for those on a 2,000 calorie-a-day diet. Additionally, the Institute of Medicine advises that adults should eat a minimum of 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram (or 0.37 grams per pound) of ideal body weight. For a person whose ideal weight is 160 pounds, for example, that would be a minimum of about 60 grams of protein. Paying attention to both pieces of guidance is important...

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