News Releases

  1. Beef calves

    Ohio State Food, Ag, Env Calendar Listings as of Jan. 28

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Here are upcoming events involving Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences as of Jan. 28: January NEW: Jan. 29: Beef Cattle School, 7 p.m. at multiple locations around Ohio; also can be viewed on Internet. First program in three-part series continuing Feb. 26, March 19. Topic is how crossbreeding can boost cattle producers’ profits and how genetic selection tools have contributed to de-emphasis of heterosis. Registration fee may vary by location; $25 advance registration fee for Internet viewing. Information: http://go.osu.edu/RXv. Registration:
 grimes.1@osu.edu or 740-289-2071. NEW: Jan. 30: Discount registration deadline for Ohio Grape and Wine Conference Feb. 18...
  2. Chow Line logo

    Chow Line: Fight against flu bug with healthy diet

    I’m trying to do all I can to avoid getting the flu this season. Is there anything in particular I should include in my diet that could help? When it comes to avoiding the flu, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the best actions you can take are to get vaccinated with the flu shot; take everyday precautions against the spread of germs, such as avoiding contact with sick people and washing your hands thoroughly and often; and, if you get the flu, see your doctor quickly (within two days of becoming ill) and ask about taking antiviral drugs to treat the illness. A healthy, balanced diet won’t prevent you from being exposed to the flu virus, but it can help boost your immune system to help you fight off the flu virus and other illnesses. Recently, the Academy...
  3. OSU Extension Conference Offers Education and Support for Conservation Tillage, March 5-6

      COLUMBUS, Ohio – When it became apparent that the dry spell many Ohio growers were experiencing last year would become the worst drought in 50 years, David Brandt wasn’t worried about how well corn and soybeans on his 1,150-acre farm would fare.  The Carroll, Ohio farmer instead relied upon a natural form of insurance that left the soils in his fields protected against the devastating effects of the record heat and drought that decimated many farmers nationwide in 2012.  Using conservation tillage methods such as no-till and planting cover crops including radishes and Austrian winter peas in 15-inch alternating rows, as well as an eight-species cover crop blend, allowed the ground temperatures on his farm to remain in a healthy range of 80 to 90 degrees...
  4. Ohio Forage and Grasslands Council Conference is Feb. 8

      REYNOLDSBURG, Ohio – While the drought of 2012 was an extreme example of dry conditions during a growing season, it was not an anomaly, meaning producers have to be prepared to deal with periods of dry conditions as part of their annual management plans, an Ohio State University Extension specialist said. Tips and techniques of how to do so will be discussed by experts in the field from OSU Extension and regional and national experts during a day-long conference hosted by the Ohio Forage and Grasslands Council Feb. 8. The event is designed to help provide information for producers on how to make their pastures and forage crops more resilient and higher yielding, said Mark Sulc, an OSU Extension forage specialist. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of...
  5. OSU Researchers Working to Increase Blackberry and Raspberry Production in Ohio

      PIKETON, Ohio – Researchers with Ohio State University Extension are in the midst of a multi-year project studying alternative planting methods to help Ohio growers increase the production of two small, increasingly popular fruits that many health experts hail as “superfoods.” The demand for blackberries and raspberries has exploded in recent years thanks to consumers who covet the tiny sweet fruits for their many health benefits, said Gary Gao, an OSU Extension specialist and associate professor of small fruit crops at the OSU South Centers at Piketon. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. And with the growing consumer demand for more locally grown, healthy foods, farmers who are able to increase...
  6. image of derrick in Carroll County

    OSU Extension Hosts Shale Workshop for Landowners Feb. 23

    CANFIELD, Ohio -- Landowners interested in shale energy development may want to attend an Ohio State University Extension workshop on Feb. 23. "Shale and You: A Workshop for Landowners" will be held at the Mill Creek MetroParks Farm, 7574 Columbiana-Canfield Road, Canfield, 1-5:30 p.m. Registration is $15. Materials and refreshments will be guaranteed to those whose registrations arrive at the OSU Extension Ag Law's office in Columbus by Feb. 18. The registration form with the office's address and other details is available at http://shalegas.osu.edu. Click on the "Shale and You" event under "Upcoming Extension Events." "We held a similar workshop in Cambridge last November, and those who attended said they got a lot out of it," said...
  7. Conference Offers Training and Education for Grape Growers and Wine Producers Feb. 18-19

      COLUMBUS, Ohio – Grape growers, wine producers and anyone interested in learning more about the wine industry will have several opportunities to learn from local and national professionals in the field during the 2013 Ohio Grape and Wine Conference.   The conference, which will be held Feb. 18-19 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel and Conference Center in Dublin, is anticipated to attract some 250 participants throughout the region, said Imed Dami, a state viticulture (grape growing) specialist with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) and Ohio State University Extension. The conference is offered jointly by Ohio State's Department of Horticulture and Crop Science, OSU Extension, OARDC, the Ohio Grape Industries Committee and the Ohio Wine...
  8. OSU Extension offers Beef Cattle School Jan. 29, Feb. 26 and March 19

      COLUMBUS, Ohio – Producers interested in learning more about how to increase cattle profits, including an in-depth look at crossbreeding programs, can participate in a discussion of the issues by experts from Ohio State University Extension and nationwide, during a Beef Cattle School Jan. 29, Feb. 26 and March 19 at several locations statewide.  The beef cattle school kicks off Jan. 29 with presentations from two nationally known cattle experts who will discuss how crossbreeding can boost profits for producers and how genetic selection tools have contributed to the de-emphasis on heterosis by some commercial cow-calf producers, said John Grimes, beef coordinator for OSU Extension and a member of the OSU Extension Beef Team. Lee Leachman of the Leachman Cattle Company...
  9. Family Fundamentals: Credit: Know what you owe, how you’ll pay it off

    How can I calculate how much total interest I will be charged until I get my credit card bill paid off? First, good for you for thinking in these terms. Too many people, especially young people, continue to rack up so much debt on credit cards that they may not be able to pay it off — ever. In fact, a recent Ohio State University study showed that many younger people — those born between 1980 and 1984 — tend to spend more money than they make every month, making up the difference on their credit cards. The result could be a lifetime of trying to manage credit card debt. The researchers said it was likely many could die decades from now, still owing money on their cards. The key, obviously, is to live within your means, stop using credit, and make higher monthly...
  10. Chow Line: Be aware of risks from eating sprouts

    I really miss topping my salads off with a handful of alfalfa sprouts. What makes them so unsafe? It doesn’t seem that long ago that sprouts were ubiquitous at every salad bar you approached. Not so much anymore. They’ve even disappeared from some major grocery store chains after numerous outbreaks traced to sprouts in recent years. The problem is in the way sprouts grow: Seeds need warm, moist growing conditions to sprout — exactly the conditions that illness-causing bacteria, such as Salmonella and E. coli, need to thrive. Even if there’s just a small amount of bacteria on or inside a seed, those cells can multiply to dangerous levels within hours in such conditions. The irony is that raw sprouts have long been touted as one of nature’s most potent...

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