News Releases

  1. CFAES names director of new Water Quality Initiative

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) has named Ohio scientist Heather Raymond as director of its new Water Quality Initiative. She began her appointment Sept. 1. Raymond, a national leader on policies and responses regarding harmful algal blooms, joins CFAES from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, where she was state harmful algal bloom (HAB) coordinator and lead hydrogeologist. She was also recently elected to serve on the National HAB Committee.  Harmful algal blooms are the often pea-green, sometimes-toxic slime outbreaks plaguing water bodies including Lake Erie. “We’re fortunate to have recruited someone with so much expertise and experience in water quality,”...
  2. New Ohio State center focuses on improving food safety, preventing foodborne illness

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—At The Ohio State University, a new food safety center will provide a centralized location for food safety resources and will further establish the university as a global leader in food safety.  The Center for Foodborne Illness Research and Prevention (CFI) will bring its 13-year record of protecting public health to Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  Founded as a nonprofit organization in December 2006, CFI’s mission is to advance a more scientific, risk-based food safety system that prevents foodborne illnesses and protects public health by translating science into policy and practice, said Barbara Kowalcyk, a CFAES assistant professor of food science and technology and an internationally...
  3. Photo: Ken Chamberlain

    Farm Science Review: Helping farmers mitigate 2019 farm crisis

    LONDON, Ohio—Whether it’s learning how to navigate new tax laws or understanding the complexities of the U.S. trade policy and its impact on agriculture, Ohio farmers likely have a lot of questions as they work through the 2019 farm crisis. Faculty and staff of The Ohio State UniversityCollege of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) will answer some of those questions and address some of the top farm management challenges facing Ohio farmers in 2019 during next week’s Farm Science Review. The annual farm trade show, sponsored by CFAES, takes place Sept. 17–19 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center, 135 State Route 38 NE, in London, Ohio. The 2019 growing season has been particularly challenging for Ohio growers and producers due to the...
  4. (Photo: Getty Images)

    News tips and events for the week of Sept. 9

    Tip 1: Solar farms spreading in Ohio: With large-scale solar energy development on the rise in Ohio, some of the state’s farmland owners are being sought out to lease their land for these projects. In the past two years, the Ohio Power Siting Board has approved six large-scale solar projects with generating capacities of 50 megawatts or more, and three more projects are pending approval. Typically, lease agreements between solar energy developers and landowners require a long-term legal commitment of 25 years or more. Leasing land for a solar energy development raises implications for the land, family, farm operation, and community. Legal and energy experts from the The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) have developed a free...
  5. Master Gardener Volunteer Amy Chenevy shows veteran Jeff Smallwood how to transplant tomatoes in the Heroes Garden. Photo: Mike Hogan.

    Veteran farming program offers heroes help

    Bob Udeck gingerly uses his hands and feet to slowly steer his four-wheeled walker carefully through the dirt- and grass-covered field, adeptly maneuvering through the ruts, divets, mounds of dirt, rocks, and plants that line the path leading to the Heroes Garden. The 74-year-old Vietnam veteran pulls up to a section of raised garden beds filled with rows of radish and pepper plants and smiles as he admires his handy work: Many of the plants have already begun bearing fruit, some of which were ripe and ready for picking. “I used to farm when I was younger,” Udeck said, as he wistfully looked out over the plot that houses the Veteran Farming Program. “It feels really good to get your hands dirty again—planting something, nurturing it, and watching it produce...
  6. Switchgrass and Indiangrass, both prairie grasses, can survive flooded conditions and even drought. (Photo: CFAES)

    Planting alternative grasses that can handle lots of rain

    LONDON, Ohio—Like many of us, farm animals want to eat what they’re used to. And because livestock are not adventurous eaters, farmers have to train them to try something new by limiting their access to the food they’re most familiar with. That can be done by growing new grasses in a different field, and then moving the livestock to graze on that field. It’s kind of like when parents don’t give the option of chicken fingers and buttered spaghetti to their picky child and instead serve just roast and broccoli. Many farmers in Ohio might be trying to grow and feed their animals different grasses this year, as supplies for hay and traditional forage grasses are exceptionally low. Ohio’s hay supply is the lowest since the 2012 drought, and the...
  7. Ohio State’s Inaugural Dean’s Charity Steer Show Raises $152,000

    COLUMBUS—The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences vice president and dean, Cathann A. Kress, hosted the inaugural Dean’s Charity Steer Show raising $152,000 to benefit the Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC) of Central Ohio. The event was held on July 30, 2019 at the Ohio State Fair and surpassed all expectations. “I am so appreciative of the unbelievable support we received in our first year of doing this,” said Kress. “It was wonderful to see the community come together to celebrate agriculture and children, both our 4-H youth as well as youth who benefit from the wonderful Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Ohio.” The charity steer show, which was held at the Ohio Expo Center and...
  8. Pounden Hall, Ohio State Wooster campus

    Wooster’s BioHio Research Park to be transitioned

    WOOSTER – A decision has been made by the BioHio Board of Directors to transition the work of the BioHio Research Park, an affiliate of The Ohio State University, in Wayne County to the auspices of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences’ (CFAES) at The Ohio State University. As an affiliate of Ohio State, BioHio was envisioned in 2010 and was created to facilitate the movement of discoveries from the college into the commercial sector. It is located on the CFAES Wooster campus. Additional goals of BioHio were to advance, encourage, and promote the industrial, economic, commercial and civic development of the Wooster area and to serve as a research park for the benefit of The Ohio State University, the City of Wooster, and Wayne County. “...
  9. A class on exercises that can be done while sitting in a farm vehicle is among the offerings at the upcoming Farm Science Review. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Exercise in a combine?

    LONDON, Ohio—With all the bending, lifting, and repetitive moves that farming demands, the career can exact a toll on a person’s body—young or old. Pain might seem unavoidable, the inevitable cost of cultivating the land. However, there are ways to prevent long- and short-term injuries, in part through exercises that can be done while sitting in a tractor or a combine. More exercise? “When you’ve already worked 14 hours a day, you don’t want to work out. But there is a way to fit some exercises and stretching into your routine without having to go to the gym,” said Laura Akgerman, disability services coordinator for Ohio AgrAbility. The program, which is offered by The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental...
  10. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: New research shows washing raw poultry dangers

    I just can’t stomach the idea of not washing raw chicken before cooking it. The slime on it is really off-putting. Isn’t rinsing out my sink afterward good enough to prevent spreading any germs? No, it’s not. You shouldn’t wash or rinse raw chicken or any other raw poultry before cooking it, because doing so doesn’t kill any bacterial pathogens such as Campylobacter, salmonella, or other bacteria that might be on the inside and outside of raw chicken.  When you wash or rinse raw chicken, you are likely splashing chicken juices that can spread those pathogens in the kitchen and contaminate other foods, utensils, and countertops, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Some estimates say the splatter can spread out and land on...

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