News Releases

  1. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: CDC: Avoid “zombie” deer meat

    I keep hearing about “zombie deer.” What is that? What you are talking about is chronic wasting disease, a disease that has been featured in numerous national media outlets and news stories in recent weeks. Chronic wasting disease, which has also been called “zombie deer disease,” rots the brains of deer, elk, and moose, causing them to act lethargic and less afraid of humans before dying, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While Ohio’s current status designation is “chronic wasting disease-free in the wild,” there have been some reported cases in three surrounding states: Michigan, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania, the CDC said. The disease has been detected in 24 states thus far, the CDC said. “Chronic...
  2. PHOTO: Front row, from left: Chris Henney, Floyd Poruban, Kristi-Warren Scott. Back row, from left: Associate Dean and Director of Academic Programs Steven Neal, Richard Edema, Leandro Cruppe, Bo Harstine, Bryan Garton, Steve Goodwin, Leah Curtis, Bob Birkenholz, Virgil Strickler, Alumni Board President Nick Rettig.

    12 recognized at CFAES Alumni Awards Luncheon

    COLUMBUS—The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) congratulates its 2019 Alumni Awards recipients. “It is wonderful to see so many people from our college community here to share their support for these outstanding honorees,’’ Steven Neal, CFAES associate dean and director of academic programs, told 140 alumni, relatives, faculty, staff, and friends during an awards luncheon on March 2. “We are all inspired by the accomplishments of these individuals.” In all, 12 individuals received awards during the annual event, held on Ohio State’s Columbus campus at the Fawcett Center: The Meritorious Service Award is given to alumni or non-alumni who have been singularly significant in CFAES...
  3. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Helping farmers know their bottom line

    LOUISVILLE, Ohio—In this rural town, a short drive from Canton, Ohio, Mark Thomas had been running a 400-cow dairy farm for years. That, plus row-cropping 2,000 acres, kept him outside, where he wanted to be most days. But the number-crunching side of his job—tabulating production costs, losses, and inventory—never thrilled him. He and his wife, Chris, made money, sure. They paid their taxes on time, always. But for a while, they weren’t able to keep as close a watch on their production costs as they could have. And though profits for milk have dipped in recent years, they kept on milking. Last year, they stopped. Selling off their herd of Holsteins, they switched to raising heifers while continuing with cultivating corn, soybeans, and wheat. While it was...
  4. Photo: Getty Images

    News tips and events for the week of March 11

    News Tip 1: Recognizing Ohio Farmers’ Contributions. Today marks the start of Ohio Agriculture Week, which corresponds with National Agriculture Week, a time to acknowledge all those who contribute to the agriculture industry: farmer, ranchers, producers, and others. Ohio is the top producer of Swiss cheese; third top producer of eggs and pumpkins; fourth top producer of tomatoes; seventh top producer of soybeans; and the eighth top producer of corn, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) aims to support and increase agricultural productivity within the United States as well as overseas. For more information, contact Sherrie Whaley, CFAES media relations coordinator, at...
  5. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Modeling healthy eating is beneficial to children

    My little boy is at the age where he has decided he does not like to eat vegetables. As a parent, how can I instill better eating habits in my child? While it’s normal for young children to be picky eaters, there are ways that you can help them develop healthier eating habits. One easy way is through modeling healthy eating habits yourself. One of the most common ways that children learn new things is by watching and imitating parents’ actions. In fact, research has shown that parents’ eating choices can have a major influence on their children, said Ingrid Adams, state specialist in food, health, and human behavior for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio...
  6. News tips and events for the week of March 4

    Tip 1: Supporting women in agriculture: Some 40 percent of Ohio’s farms are managed or co-managed by women. With women playing such a significant role in the state’s agriculture, a conference is being held to assist them as well as women interested in pursuing the profession. The East Ohio Women in Agriculture Conference on March 22 in Massillon features a networking fair and 19 breakout sessions presented by Ohio State University Extension educators, producers, and partner agencies. Jeff Dwyer of Michigan State University Extension will deliver the conference keynote, titled “Weathering the Storm in Agriculture,” about the effects of stress on farm families. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural...
  7. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Understanding symptoms of food poisoning

    How do I know if I have food poisoning? The symptoms of food poisoning vary depending on the type of germ to which you’ve been exposed, but there are some common signs that can indicate whether you’ve been exposed to a foodborne illness. The most common signs include stomach cramps, upset stomach, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and fever. Some bacteria, such as Listeria can cause flu-like symptoms. It’s important to note that symptoms of food poisoning can range from mild to serious and that some of them can come on as quickly as 30 minutes after you eat or as long as four weeks after you’ve eaten something that contains a foodborne pathogen, according the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The time it takes for symptoms of a foodborne illness to...
  8. Wang receives The Ohio State University's Distinguished Scholar Award

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Scientist Guo-Liang Wang, an international leader in rice genetics, has received The Ohio State University’s Distinguished Scholar Award for his contributions to global food security. The award, which includes a $20,000 research grant and a $3,000 honorarium, recognizes exceptional scholarly accomplishments by senior professors who have compiled a substantial body of research. Wang, a professor of plant pathology in Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) since 1999, has produced pioneering insights into the resistance of crop plants to fungal and bacterial pathogens, specifically disease resistance in rice. Rice is one of the most important crop plants on the planet, feeding half the world’s population...
  9. Phosphorus filters are being studied in Ohio as a possible means of improving water quality in Lake Erie and other bodies of water. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Keeping phosphorus out of waterways

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—In a pit about 3 feet underground lies one possible solution to reducing a large amount of the phosphorus draining from some of Ohio’s agricultural fields. At two locations in the state, researchers with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) are testing phosphorus filters that have the potential to remove up to 75 percent of the phosphorus running through them. Phosphorus can be found in commercial fertilizers and animal manure. On a typical agricultural field, rainfall percolates through layers of soil and eventually into an underground plastic pipe system that carries the rain to a drainage pipe, then to a ditch or nearby waterway. With a phosphorus filter, the water flows through an underground tank...
  10. News tips and events for the week of Feb. 25

    Tip 1: Maple Madness: North America is the only place in the world that produces maple syrup, and Ohio is one of 12 maple-producing states. Each year, the Buckeye state ranks 4th or 5th in maple production. Maple syrup is made from sap collected from sugar, black, and red maple trees during February and March. Freezing nights and warm days are required for the sap to flow properly from the trees. Get the scoop on this year’s projected maple sap run from Gary Graham, who leads the Ohio State University Extension Maple Syrup Program at Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). He can be reached at 330-674-3015 or graham.124@osu.edu. Approximately 40 sugar houses will be open in northwest, central, and northeast Ohio on the Ohio Maple...

Pages