News Releases

  1. Chow Line: Tips to prevent holiday weight gain

    I need some inspiration to help keep me from gaining weight during the holidays. Any ideas? The temptations of the season often come not with glitter and sparkle, but with sugar, fat and calories. Fortunately, weight gain isn’t inevitable. In fact, most studies suggest an average weight gain over the holidays of about 1 pound. This is good news, because most people assume it is five or 10 times that number. Still, researchers warn that people tend to keep that extra pound instead of shedding it after the season is over. Those pounds can pile up over time, leading to significant weight gain. Studies also indicate that people who are already overweight are more likely to gain five pounds or more during the holidays. Perhaps the first thing to acknowledge is that this won’t...
  2. Kopp, Mancl, at bioreactor site

    First-of-its-kind Wastewater Treatment System Saves Turkey Processor Millions, Protects Environment

    HARRISON, Ohio -- A southwestern Ohio turkey processing plant has much to be thankful for this season. Whitewater Processing Co. slaughters and processes 6,000 to 8,000 turkeys on a normal day, producing about 2.5 to 3 million pounds of turkey in an average month. The Kopp family has run the business since the 1930s, and with 110 employees, wanted to stay put. But in the 1990s, environmental concerns about the 145,000 gallons of wastewater it produces each day nearly sunk the business. Today, with a first-of-its-kind treatment system designed by an Ohio State University researcher, the rough waters have calmed. And though the costs have been considerable -- about $1 million to build the wastewater treatment system plus an estimated $1.8 million to operate and maintain it over...
  3. Family Fundamentals: Make plan, be firm to curb holiday spending

    For the month of November 2012 Every year, I spend more money than I want to during the holidays. Can you suggest ways to help me not go overboard this year? Sure. But all the tips and guidance in the world won’t help unless you make a firm commitment to yourself that this year will be different. Just as with any change to long-held habits (think “I’m going to lose weight” or “I’m going to quit smoking”), it will take energy, determination and focus. It won’t just happen simply because you want it to happen. With that in mind, here’s some advice: Estimate what you want to spend overall. Then list categories of what you plan to purchase. Include everything holiday-related: gifts (how many and who you’re buying for);...
  4. image of pine tree and cone

    Ohio State Forestry Students to Hold Christmas Tree Sale Nov. 29-Dec. 2

    COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Ohio State University’s Forestry Forum, a group for students interested in forestry as a career, will hold its annual public Christmas tree sale from Nov. 29 to Dec. 2 behind the university’s Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, 2201 Fred Taylor Drive, in Columbus. Hours are noon to dark on Nov. 29, 9 a.m. to dark on Nov. 30 and Dec. 1, and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Dec. 2. The trees are fresh cut Ohio-grown Fraser firs, Scotch pines, white pines and blue spruces in heights from 6 to 9 feet. Proceeds from the sale will support scholarships, travel to academic conferences and other activities for students in the group. Buyers can receive a 10 percent discount with a coupon available at http://go.osu.edu/treesale (pdf) that can be printed and brought in or...
  5. chow line logo

    Chow Line: Know warning signs, risk of diabetes

    No one in my family has ever had diabetes. Does that mean I’m not at risk for developing it? Although there is a genetic component to diabetes, it’s not 100 percent: Many people develop type 2 diabetes without having a family history of the disease. Conversely, it’s not guaranteed that you’ll develop the disease even if you have close family members who have it, though your risk is higher. A warning: You may think no one in your family has ever had diabetes, but many cases go undiagnosed. So you may be operating under a false sense of security. Type 2 diabetes accounts for about 95 percent of all diabetes cases. It’s marked by high blood glucose levels primarily caused by the body’s inability to use its insulin efficiently. In contrast, type 1...
  6. image of dairy cow for compost bedded pack workshop

    OARDC to Host Compost Bedded Pack Dairy Barn Workshop on Dec. 5

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- The Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) will host a workshop on compost bedded pack dairy barns on Dec. 5. The same program will be offered in Tennessee on Dec. 12 and in Kentucky on Dec. 13. A compost bedded pack dairy barn is an alternative dairy system with solid manure handling options, said Lingying Zhao, an associate professor of food, agricultural and biological engineering at Ohio State University and one of the event’s organizers and speakers. “There’s increased interest in the compost bedded pack system because of its potential for positive impacts on milk production and cow health and its ability to handle manure as a dry material,” Zhao said. Possible benefits of the system also include less...
  7. BiOWiSH's Bill Diederich, OARDC's Robert Hansen and CropKing's Natalie Bumgarner survey recently transplanted lettuce at an OARDC greenhouse.

    New Bio-fertilizer Can Increase Hydroponic Vegetable Growth: Ohio State Trials

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- A new organic-based fertilizer for commercial hydroponic production can boost lettuce growth by about 13 percent, according to preliminary trials conducted by Ohio State University's Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center(OARDC) in Wooster. The fertilizer, BiOWiSH-Hydroponic, is produced by BiOWiSH Technologies, a Chicago-based manufacturer of natural food production and environmental remediation technologies.  Available in the U.S. market for a little over a year and for two years internationally, the fertilizer is a unique blend of bacteria and biocatalysts that, according to company claims, helps speed up the breakdown of organic matter and potentially impacts plant...
  8. culture of C. diff samples

    Researchers: Food May Be Source of C. diff Infections

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- The increasing incidence of a difficult-to-control bacterial illness is leading researchers to suspect that contaminated foods might be contributing to the problem. Clostridium difficile, known as "C. diff," can cause a serious infection that is responsible for 14,000 American deaths annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It's estimated there are about 500,000 U.S. cases of C. diff infection annually, and that about 3 to 5 percent of healthy adults are carriers of toxic C. diff bacteria but experience no symptoms. Normally associated with the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics during a stay in the hospital or in other healthcare settings, C. diff infection is marked by frequent, watery diarrhea; abdominal pain or tenderness;...
  9. Plant pathologist Anne Dorrance is a national expert on soybean diseases.

    OARDC Receives National Research Award for Critical Soybean Rust Work

    WOOSTER, Ohio -- The Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) is one of the recipients of the 2012 Experiment Station Section Award of Excellence in Multistate Research for its work to rapidly address the threat of soybean rust to U.S. agricultural production.   The annual award is given by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) in recognition of successful, well-coordinated, high-impact, multi-institution research efforts. It was presented Nov. 11 at APLU’s annual awards program in Denver.   OARDC scientists earned the award along with colleagues from more than 30 U.S. and...
  10. chow line logo

    Chow Line: Take precautions if stuffing turkey

    I have always stuffed our Thanksgiving turkey with homemade stuffing, but my daughter tells me it’s not safe. Should I stop? Would it make a difference if I used stuffing from a box? Cooking a stuffed turkey is potentially more risky than cooking one without, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) doesn’t recommend it. That said, if you take a few precautions, all should be fine. And whether you make your own stuffing or prepare it from a box, you need to follow the same procedures.  The FSIS offers detailed guidelines at http://bit.ly/safestuff. Among its recommendations: If you prepare the stuffing ahead of time, store wet and dry ingredients separately; be sure to refrigerate the wet ingredients, including any...

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