News Releases

  1. Nearly 80,000 pounds of produce grown for food pantries statewide

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Master Gardener Volunteers from across Ohio grew nearly 80,000 pounds of produce in 2020 statewide and donated it all to 101 food pantries in cities and towns across the state. The Master Gardener Volunteer program is a U.S.- and Canada-wide effort that in Ohio is run by Ohio State University Extension, which is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The produce grown included fruits, vegetables, and herbs and was equivalent to 65,200 meals, according to Pam Bennett, state master gardener volunteer program director and horticulture educator with OSU Extension. Although Master Gardener Volunteers have grown and donated food through this program for 20 years, growers ramped up their...
  2. Sea Grant researcher Justin Chaffin in his lab.

    Ohio Colleges and Universities Invited to Submit Pre-Proposals for Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative

    COLUMBUS – Ohio Sea Grant, The Ohio State University, and The University of Toledo are requesting pre-proposals for one- to two-year research projects from Ohio colleges and universities as part of the Ohio Department of Higher Education’s Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative (HABRI). Pre-proposals must be submitted online by Thursday, February 18, 2021, at 5 p.m. EST.   The funding focuses on agency priorities aimed at reducing nutrient loading to Lake Erie via wetland design, identifying agricultural management practices that are both efficient and cost-effective, learning about algal toxin formation and human health impacts, and informing water treatment technologies. Addressing these priorities will help support agencies’ management decisions...
  3. Ohio State researchers are taking black raspberries and making highly controlled foods, such as a nectar, and studying them in the laboratory and in humans for anticancer activity. Photo: Getty Images.

    Co-op gift funds food-based cancer research

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—A $190,000 gift to the Cooperatives for the Cure Cancer Fund boosts food-based cancer research at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James), and Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The fund was created with the hope of finding a common goal for agricultural cooperatives to work together on bettering their communities through the support of cancer research. This year’s donation brings the total donated since 2009, when the effort began, to $1.5 million. Supporting the fund are two campaigns, Growing the Cure and Fueling the Cure, toward which the cooperatives donate money from soybean and corn...
  4. Judit Puskas and Monica Giusti

    Two Ohio State scientists elected to National Academy of Inventors

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Two faculty members in The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have been elected to the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) 2020 class of Fellows. Monica Giusti, professor of food science and technology, and Judit Puskas, professor of food, agricultural and biological engineering, join a class of 175 academic innovators representing universities and governmental or nonprofit research institutes named to the Fellows program this year. They are the 11th and 12th Ohio State inventors to be chosen as NAI Fellows. “The work done by our newest NAI Fellows demonstrates the breadth of research expertise that can be found at Ohio State – and, in this instance, within a single college,...
  5. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Yes, your poinsettia can survive after the holidays

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Bold when you buy them, poinsettias can wither as winter goes on.  It might be because of how they were treated. If they were exposed to cold drafts or perched by a heat vent, or if they sat in a cold car through too many errands, the leaves could turn yellow and fall off—even before the holidays or not long after.  Native to Mexico, poinsettias favor bright light and warm conditions. “You need to find a location in your house that provides good light. Six hours of bright light are necessary every day,” said Uttara Samarakoon, an assistant professor at Ohio State ATI in The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  The biggest mistakes people typically make are not providing...
  6. Horse standing in snow outside barn.

    Online equine classes offered by Ohio State ATI

    Whether you’re a horse owner or just a horse fanatic who can’t get enough of anything horse-related, you can take advantage of online equine courses at Ohio State ATI in Wooster, Ohio. The two equine courses planned for spring semester are horse health and disease, and horse breeding and selection.  Horse health and disease is a study of equine disease, lameness, and emergency first aid with emphasis on preventative health care and the manager’s role with the veterinary professional. Horse breeding and selection teaches the principles of equine breeding management with emphasis on applied equine reproductive physiology, breeding methods, breeding stock management, and basic genetics and selection.  Both courses include a hands-on lab that will meet...
  7. Photo: Getty Images

    Holiday baking? The CDC says don’t eat the raw dough

    Is it safe to lick the bowl when making cakes or cookies? No, it’s not. While it’s that time of year when holiday cookies reign supreme, it’s also a good time of year to warn folks against eating foods with raw eggs for fear of contracting salmonella or other foodborne illnesses. Raw flour is also not safe to eat, because it too can cause a mean case of foodborne illness, said Shari Gallup, family and consumer sciences educator for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Although many people might love the taste of raw cookie dough or raw cake or brownie batter, eating it can make you sick. Raw or undercooked eggs can cause salmonella...
  8. New science building on the CFAES Wooster campus

    CFAES Wooster new umbrella term for Ohio State location

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Wooster, Ohio has long played an important role for The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Two of its major components, the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), and the two-year associate degree-granting program, the Agricultural Technical Institute (ATI), got their start there in 1892 and 1968, respectively. While in past years, the research and student pieces have operated separately, new changes are afoot to unify the campus. A first step in ensuring this evolution is a name change to CFAES Wooster. Changing the name of the campus will also produce shared resources, infrastructure, personnel, and equipment. “It allows us to think about this location as a full campus,...
  9. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Healthy ways to improve immunity

    As we go into the winter months and illness chances increase, what can I do to boost my immune system? Your question is on the minds of many consumers, as more people have been reaching for vitamin supplements and seeking out healthy foods to improve their immune system amid the COVID-19 pandemic. In fact, 77% of consumers say they want to eat healthier to boost their immunity during the pandemic, according to a study by Archer Daniels Midland, a Chicago-based, food-processing company. Building and maintaining a healthy immune system starts with focusing on good nutrition, said Beth Stefura, a family and consumer sciences educator for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental...
  10. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Dreading winter? Try to lighten up

    Another Ohio winter is upon us.  The extra hours of darkness or slate-gray skies can easily drag down a mood already challenged by the pandemic. We’re socializing less often, hunkering down, and shelving vacation plans to warmer and brighter tropical spots. Meanwhile, we have to tackle what seems like an endless string of Zoom meetings while trying to edge our kids into get-it-done mode, and at the end of the day, confront the same hurdle: What’s for dinner? So how do we keep pandemic exhaustion from descending into depression? David Wirt, a counselor with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), has some advice on how to lighten your mood in the coldest months of the year. Get out in the sunlight every...

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