News Releases

  1. (Photo: Getty Images)

    News tips and events for the week of July 8

    Tip 1: Helping farmers prepare for weather challenges: Ohio just experienced its wettest year on record. Along with more rainfall, the state is experiencing more intense downpours, which can put fields at risk of erosion and could send phosphorus and nitrogen from fertilizer into nearby waterways. A conference aims to help farmers prepare for the challenges resulting from a wetter, warmer climate. “Climate Smart: Farming with Weather Extremes” on Thursday, July 18, at the Der Dutchman restaurant in Plain City will include a host of speakers addressing not only climate trends, but also the pros and cons of various ways to manage water on fields. The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) is cosponsoring the event with the State...
  2. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Barbecue safely this Fourth of July

    I’m ready to use my grill for the first time this summer for a July Fourth cookout. Is it OK to use a steel wire grill brush to clean the grease and grime that’s built up since the last time I used it?   Your question is similar to another that was asked in a “Chow Line” column from July 2018, so it’s best answered by reissuing that column here. When using a wire grill brush, it’s important to take note of how old your grill brush is and what condition it’s in. If your grill brush is worn down, warped, or has some missing bristles, you might want to consider throwing it out. This is because you’ll want to be careful that you don’t inadvertently leave behind any wire bristles from the grill-cleaning brush that could...
  3. Corn can be planted as a cover crop this year. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Federal change to assist farmers who plant cover crops

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Farmers prevented from planting a cash crop due to unrelenting rain can now sow a cover crop and still be eligible to receive some federal trade assistance. This aid is in addition to crop insurance payments on those acres. The change in policy on cover crops that the U.S. Department of Agriculture made on July 1 is one of several allowances the agency has made in recent weeks to assist farmers in the Midwest, where persistent rain has delayed or prevented many growers from planting cash crops. The funds for trade assistance on cover crop acreage will come through the Market Facilitation Program (MFP), aid for farmers that was created to help offset growers’ losses as a result of the recent, international tariffs on U.S. goods. Many Midwestern farmers...
  4. News tips and events for the week of July 1

    Tip: What farmers can do about prevented planting: An event offered twice on Wednesday, July 3, will help farmers decide what to do if rain has kept them from planting their crops. The issue has become a crisis: The past 12 months have been the wettest on record in Ohio, and because of the rain and muddy fields, many corn and soybean growers haven’t planted this year’s crops yet; they might not be able to plant them at all. The event, called Managing Prevented Planting Acres, will share details on considerations including crop insurance, weed control, forage production, and cover crops. Experts from The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) will serve as the featured speakers. The event is set for 9 a.m...
  5. Dean Cathann Kess and 4-H partner Wyatt Osborn

    Ohio State Fair to feature inaugural Dean’s Charity Steer Show

    COLUMBUS—A new event that will celebrate Ohio agriculture, Ohio communities, and Ohio children is planned for the 2019 Ohio State Fair. The inaugural Dean’s Charity Steer Show will be held from 2–4 p.m. on Tuesday, July 30, at the Voinovich Livestock & Trade Center at the Ohio Expo Center and State Fair. The event will be hosted by Cathann A. Kress, vice president for agricultural administration and dean of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). “This will be an exciting event to bring together our community to celebrate agriculture and children, both for our 4-H youth development programs as well as youth benefitting from the Ronald McDonald House,” Kress said. “All proceeds from the...
  6. Discolored leaves such as this, suggest fungal disease in this tomato plant. The leaves need pruned with sterilized pruners and then discarded into the garbage and not the compost pile. Photo curtesy of Timothy McDermott.

    Chow Line: Excess rainfall impacting tomato plants

    I’ve grown tomato plants in my central Ohio backyard for the past couple of years, as part of my efforts to make healthier food choices for my family. But this year, the leaves on the tomato plants are discolored and dying. What’s going on with the plants, and can my tomatoes be saved? It’s wonderful that you are making healthy food choices for your family. Tomatoes are excellent sources of vitamins A, C, and K, and potassium and folate. The tomato is also a wonderful source of the antioxidant lycopene, which has been linked to several important health benefits such as reducing your risk of heart disease and some types of cancer, as well as helping you maintain a healthy blood pressure. Without having seen your specific tomato plants, I can offer some suggestions...
  7. Night event WANTS lots of bugs (and kids)

    WOOSTER, Ohio—Swarms of bugs will be out in the darkness—buzzing, flying, bioluminescing—on July 13 in Wooster. And that’s good news for curious kids and their hopefully equally eager families. The Ohio State University’s annual Insect Night is set for that evening at Secrest Arboretum. The event will celebrate the many-legged creatures that call our planet home—especially the creepy-crawlies for whom the nighttime is the right time. “Insects are the most diverse animals on Earth. They affect our ecosystems, agriculture, and health,” said event co-organizer Kendall King, an Ohio State graduate student in entomology, or insect science. “This is our way of sharing our passion for insects with our local communities.”...
  8. Excessive rain has contributed to a severe dip in the hay inventory across the Midwest. (Photo: CFAES)

    Hay inventory severely low across Midwest

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Excessive rainfall has not only hindered soybean and corn farmers’ attempts to plant, but has contributed to a near record-low level of hay to feed livestock in Ohio and across the Midwest. The hay inventory in Ohio has dipped to the fourth lowest level in the 70 years of reporting inventory, leaving farmers struggling to find ways to keep their animals well fed, said Stan Smith, a program assistant in agriculture and natural resources for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The situation is not much different across the Midwest, where some livestock owners are having to pay much higher prices for animal feed. “We’re...
  9. A day for making the most of manure

    STRASBURG, Ohio—Expect plenty of fertile conversation at Manure Science Review. Designed to share ways to put manure to good use, and to do it while protecting the environment and water quality, the annual event is on Aug. 7 at JIMITA Holsteins, a 400-plus-acre family dairy farm in Strasburg. Strasburg is about 20 miles south of Canton in northeast Ohio. Manure offers nutrients that crops need to grow and can reduce a farmer’s commercial fertilizer costs, said event co-organizer Chris Zoller, educator, agriculture and natural resources, Tuscarawas County office of Ohio State University Extension. “That’s especially important as the margins in agriculture, especially in the dairy economy, have been very tight,” Zoller said. OSU...
  10. Farmer on computer in dairy barn. Photo: Getty Images

    News tips and events for the week of June 24

    Tip 1: The Dairy Margin Coverage Program is a hot topic this week. Experts at The Ohio State University are holding 13 informational meetings with dairy producers throughout the state to explain the intricacies of the new Dairy Margin Coverage (DMC) Program and how to use a new decision tool. DMC is a voluntary federal program that will make payments to farmers when the national average income-over-feed-cost margin falls below a farmer-selected coverage level. Four meetings were held last week to educate dairy producers about enrolling in and choosing to lock in coverage levels in the new program, which was authorized under the 2018 Farm Bill. The last few years have been tough for dairy farmers due to rollercoaster milk margins and loss of some markets. Ohio State’s College of...

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