News Releases

  1. Dig into soil health at Feb. 14 workshop

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—The answers to growing better crops are under your feet if you look. So says Steve Culman, soil fertility specialist at The Ohio State University, who is helping lead an upcoming workshop on how to test your soil. “Soil testing provides a window into the soil, revealing if a plant is likely to see the nutrients it needs to grow and thrive,” said Culman, based at the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The workshop, called “Digging Into Soil Health: What Tests Can Tell Us About Our Soil,” will be Feb. 14 in Dayton. It’s part of the annual conference of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA), which runs from Feb. 14–16. Now celebrating its 40th year, the OEFFA conference is...
  2. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Ohio State expert warns about effect of rock salt on plants

    SPRINGFIELD, Ohio—Rock salt and other de-icing agents can be especially useful in tackling the ice and snow during cold, long winters. However, according to a horticulture expert at The Ohio State University, if misused, these chemicals can cause damage to surrounding plants. Consumers have used de-icing agents for years to remove snow and ice from driveways, sidewalks, and porches. The rock salt lowers the freezing point of the ice by creating a solution of water and salt. However, this salt has other damaging effects: pitting of concrete sidewalks and driveways, as well as harming plants, shrubs, and grass in surrounding areas, said Pam Bennett, an associate professor in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. “High salt content changes the...
  3. A gypsy moth in the larval stage. Photo: Getty Images.

    News tips and events for the week of Jan. 28

    Tip 1: Gypsy Moth Surge: Ohio has experienced a resurgence in the gypsy moth over the past two years. The gypsy moth is a non-native pest that feeds on leaves and needles of over 300 different trees. The damage gypsy moths do occurs in the spring and early summer when populations are present. Some of the hot spots include Marion and Lucas counties. The Ohio Department of Agriculture will host a series of meetings in February to discuss aerial treatments planned for this spring. Amy Stone, an educator with Ohio State University Extension, can address questions from the media about the prevalence of the gypsy moth and the problems it has created. Stone can be reached at stone.91@osu.edu or 419-392-1308. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food,...
  4. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Prep and freeze food for later use in oven, slow cooker

    When I get home from work some nights, I am exhausted and simply don’t feel like cooking. Any tips on what I can do to still eat healthy those nights without having to go out to eat or spend a lot of time making a meal? On a nonworkday, you could make several meals in advance and then store them in your freezer to defrost at a later date. On a day when you don’t have the time or energy to make a full meal, you’ll have access to quick, easy, nutritious, homemade meal options. Freezing meals in advance can be helpful anytime you need a ready-to-go meal or when you take a meal to someone in need, said Shannon Carter, an Ohio State University Extension educator with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. “Freezer...
  5. Photo: Thinkstock

    News tips and events for the week of Jan. 22

    Tip 1: e-Fields Report: On the farm, data can be crucial in helping make the right decisions. The recently released e-Fields 2018 Report offers data about tests done on 95 farms in 25 Ohio counties. The topics researched in the report include nutrient management, seeding, crop management, soil compaction management, remote sensing, and data analysis and management. Each study includes information about weather, soil types, and management practice. Elizabeth Hawkins, an Ohio State University agronomist based in Clinton County, can address media questions about the report. She can be reached at hawkins.301@osu.edu or 937-382-0901. January 2019 events 24 Grafting Workshop, 8 a.m. to noon, Jack and Deb Miller Pavilion, Secrest Arboretum, OARDC, CFAES Wooster Campus, 1680 Madison...
  6. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Meal kits and other food delivery services should include a focus on food safety

    I’m using a meal kit delivery service for the first time. What do I need to be aware of when ordering, and when the food arrives? Meal kit delivery and food preparation services have grown in popularity in recent years, with revenue in that sector expected to grow to over $10 billion in 2020, up from $1 billion in 2015, according to Statista, Inc., a New York-based market and consumer data firm. Ease and convenience are some of the factors for that increase, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. But, it’s important that safe food handling methods are used when receiving food through a mail delivery service, especially when receiving perishable foods, food safety experts say. Whether it be a subscription meal kit, mail-ordered food, or groceries delivered...
  7. (Photo: CFAES)

    Ohio State researcher creates innovative medical gloves

    CORRECTION: Due to incorrect information provided, the Jan. 17 version of this release incorrectly stated two things: that a medical glove produced by an Italian company contains Hevea, and that the medical glove produced by Katrina Cornish and her research team is the first Radiation Attenuation (RA) medical glove that can fend off radiation and pathogens, does not require double-gloving, and does not cause allergies. The Italian company’s RA medical glove does not contain Hevea and it can fend off radiation and pathogens, does not require double-gloving, and does not cause life-threatening allergies. It is made of synthetic rubber compared to Cornish’s glove, which is made of natural rubber. A corrected version of the press release is below. WOOSTER, Ohio—An Ohio...
  8. Japan Prize goes to CFAES soil scientist Rattan Lal

    TOKYO—Rattan Lal, a soil scientist at The Ohio State University, has been awarded the 2019 Japan Prize, considered one of the most prestigious honors in science and technology. Lal is the first Ohio State scientist and the first soil scientist to ever receive the prize. He is Distinguished University Professor of Soil Science at the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The Japan Prize recognizes scientists and engineers from around the world for original and outstanding achievements that “not only contribute to the advancement of science and technology, but also promote peace and prosperity for all mankind,” the Japan Prize Foundation said today (Jan. 16) in announcing the award. Lal, whose career in science spans five decades...
  9. (Photo: Getty Images)

    News tips and events for the week of Jan. 14

    Tip 1: Soybean Prices Rebounding? Soybean prices showed early strength at the start of the New Year, in part because of lower estimates of soybean production in Brazil, the world’s top supplier. The rise may also be because of optimism over a potential trade deal with China, the leading soybean consumer in the world, said Ben Brown, manager of the farm management program in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University (CFAES). The recent price increases are a welcome change in a market that has contended with a dip in prices over the past six months. Brown is available to discuss the price trends and provide future projections. He can be reached at brown.6888@osu.edu, 614-688-8686, or 660-492-7574 (cell). Brown and others from CFAES...
  10. Milk and eggs are among the most common foods identified as allergens among U.S. adults. Photo: Getty Images.

    Chow Line: Some food allergies really aren’t food allergies

    My husband has always assumed he is allergic to strawberries, but it turns out that he’s not allergic at all. He just has an intolerance to them. How common is that? Very, it seems. According to a new study published this week in the journal JAMA Network Open, nearly half of the people who think they have food allergies, really don’t. Instead, many people may suffer from food intolerance or celiac disease, which they may believe to be an allergic reaction to certain foods. The study, which was done at Children’s Hospital of Chicago and Northwestern University, was based on a nationally representative survey of over 40,443 adults. According to the study results, 19 percent of adults think they are currently food allergic, although their reported symptoms are...

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