News Releases

  1. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Stress task force offering help to struggling Ohio farmers

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Dairy farmers grapple with slumps in milk prices while the cost of feeding their cows keeps rising. For crop farmers, prices for corn and soybeans remain low, and many growers couldn’t plant either crop this year. The persistent spring rain created the state’s worst planting year on record and has contributed to a near-record low level of hay to feed livestock in Ohio and across the Midwest. So much is out of a farmer’s control. Weather. Commodity and feed prices. A hike in international tariffs on American agricultural goods that has diminished demand for them. When rain this past spring kept farmers from planting, among the comments that circulated on Facebook was one offering a phone number for a suicide hotline.   Now, perhaps...
  2. Ohio State research has shown that air pollution remains a serious problem in low-income neighborhoods, and especially neighborhoods of color.

    Low-income, black neighborhoods still hit hard by air pollution

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Disease-causing air pollution remains high in pockets of America—particularly those where many low-income and African American people live, a disparity highlighted in research presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association in New York. The nation’s air on the whole has become cleaner in the past 70 years, but those benefits are seen primarily in whiter, higher-income areas, said Kerry Ard, an associate professor of environmental sociology at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Ard presented her research at the annual meeting on Aug. 10. Ard used a variety of detailed data sources to examine air pollution and the demographics of the people who lived in 1-...
  3. Photo: Getty Images

    News tips and events for the week of Aug. 12

    Tip 1: Seminar on Precision Livestock Farming: Daniel Berckmans, emeritus professor, animal and human health engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium, will discuss how smart technology monitoring can be used for animal welfare and human health engineering. The “Precision Livestock Farming (PLF): A Game Changer for the Worldwide Livestock Production” seminar is Aug. 15 from 10–11:30 a.m. in room250A, in the Agricultural Administration Building, 2120 Fyffe Road, in Columbus. Hosted by The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering (FABE), the seminar will discuss how emerging smart technology can be used to improve our ability to spot and treat animal...
  4. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Food safety and homemade fruit- or vegetable-infused water

    I’m planning to add either fresh strawberry or cucumber slices to a pitcher of water to serve with a lunch I’m hosting. Are there any food safety concerns that I need to be aware of when making fruit- or vegetable-infused water? Infusing water with fruits or vegetables is a wonderful, healthy, and delicious way to add flavor to water without adding sugar. Not only is infused water a simple way to stay hydrated, but it has also become increasingly popular among consumers who are seeking healthy alternatives to sugary drinks. However, when preparing fruit- or vegetable-infused water, it’s important to keep food safety in mind to prevent the potential of developing a foodborne illness. In fact, you should handle infused water as you would any perishable food,...
  5. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Farm Science Review to offer career fair

    LONDON—Looking for a job in agriculture? Come to Farm Science Review and you just might find one. For the first time, the annual agricultural trade show, sponsored by The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), will offer the Career Exploration Fair for anyone interested in working in agriculture. On Sept. 18 from 10 a.m. to noon, visitors to the career fair can discuss jobs and internships with representatives from a variety of companies, many of them exhibitors at FSR, which is held at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center near London, Ohio. “With the hundreds of exhibiting companies, it’s a great place to look for another job or new career,” said Nick Zachrich, manager of FSR. The job fair will take...
  6. Frogeye leaf spot is one of the diseases growers should look out for, particularly among late-planted soybean plants. (Photo: CFAES)

    Planted late? Watch out for diseases

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Late-planted corn and soybeans could be vulnerable to higher-than-normal levels of crop diseases this year, experts from The Ohio State University warn. When sown one to two months later than usual, corn and soybeans stand a greater chance of succumbing, especially, to fungal diseases. Dry weather across much of Ohio since July has helped stave off some disease spread because fungal diseases need moisture to thrive. Still, during a year when late planting has already limited the yield potential on crops, it’s critical to be watchful for other threats too, including all types of diseases, molds, and insects, advise experts with Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Fungal diseases that can infect either...
  7. (Image: CFAES)

    News tips and events for the week of Aug 5

    Tip 1: Film festival celebrates agriculture: The inaugural Germinate International Film Fest taking place Aug. 16–17 in Hillsboro, Ohio, will feature two days of films about rural communities and their associated industries. The intent of the festival is to expand what people know about agriculture, natural resources, and rural communities. Along with films, the event will include panel discussions to provide a forum for open discussion about agricultural, environmental, and rural community development topics important to the public. While rural areas represent 97% of the U.S. landmass, only 19.3% of the population resides in a rural area. Less than 2% of the nation’s population identifies as farmers. This festival will provide an opportunity to showcase the agricultural...
  8. Ohio State’s Inaugural Dean’s Charity Steer Show a Rousing Success

    COLUMBUS—The Dean’s Charity Steer Show, a new event held at the Ohio State Fair, surpassed all expectations and raised more than $146,000 (and counting) for Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC) of Central Ohio. Hosted by Cathann A. Kress, vice president for agricultural administration and dean of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), the July 30 charity show included 13 teams of celebrity exhibitors and 4-Hers with their steers. It was held at the Ohio Expo Center and State Fair’s Voinovich Livestock & Trade Center. If you were unable to attend the show, donations to RMHC will be accepted through August 31 at give.osu.edu/deanscharitysteershow. “I am so appreciative of the unbelievable support we...
  9. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Multiple ways to disinfect drinking water in an emergency

    The water supply for my household has been disrupted twice this summer due to historic rainfall levels, leaving us faced with boil alerts due to floodwaters. But since our power was also out because of the storms, we had to buy bottled water instead. Is there any other way to clean the water in a situation like that?  Many people in Ohio and throughout the Midwest have experienced similar situations due to the excessive rainfall that has hit the region recently.  In fact, May 2018 to April 2019 was the wettest year on record nationwide, according to a report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Centers for Environmental Information. An average of 36.20 inches of precipitation fell nationwide, which was 6.25 inches above the...
  10. The recent disaster declaration in 40 of Ohio's counties offers financial assistance to farmers unable to plant a cash crop on saturated fields. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Ohio’s disaster aid levels still uncertain

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Though the disaster declaration for nearly half of Ohio’s counties extends low-interest loans to farmers, many growers are hoping for changes that could offer more financial help, according to experts with The Ohio State University. The full extent of benefits that come with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue’s disaster declaration are still unknown. The federal agency has yet to make decisions about the federal disaster aid bill passed in June.   Growers want the USDA to approve requested changes to disaster aid packages that would increase payment guarantees to farmers who file crop insurance claims on acres where they could not plant a cash crop, said Ben Brown, assistant professor of agricultural risk management in the...

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