News Releases

  1. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Holidays and diabetes management

    My husband has diabetes and we’re not sure what that means for him with all the holiday meals and celebrations we’re anticipating this month. Do you have any tips on how he can manage his diabetes through the holidays? With some 34.2 million Americans who have diabetes and some 88 million who have prediabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, having an understanding of how to manage the disease is key to healthy living for millions of people nationwide. And the holidays can present additional challenges for those who live with diabetes, particularly as people look for ways to either avoid temptation or make better choices while they navigate all the indulgences of the season, said Jenny Lobb, a family and consumer sciences educator for Ohio...
  2. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Turning a weed into a profit-yielding crop

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—People who garden may know about pennycress.  It’s also called “stinkweed” for the odor it gives off when it’s crushed. Unlike most weeds, pennycress seeds contain a lot of oil, and that oil can be turned into fuel for jets or diesel trucks and cars.  Two researchers at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) just began a study to create the most resilient, high-yielding varieties of pennycress for farmers to grow.  Planted in late fall and harvested in spring, pennycress could offer dual benefits to farmers. It could protect their fields from erosion in fall and winter. And it could lead to extra money in spring when harvested and sold. “It’s...
  3. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Storing small holiday meals safely

    Due to COVID-19 restrictions, we plan to host only our immediate family for Thanksgiving this year, but I still anticipate having leftovers. How long after Thursday can we safely eat the leftovers? As COVID-19 safety restrictions tighten across the country, many families are changing their usual Thanksgiving plans, with many planning to put precautions in place at holiday gatherings such as social distancing and asking those with COVID-19 symptoms not to attend, according to a nationwide survey from The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. The survey found that 79% of respondents say they plan to celebrate only with household members, 73% plan to follow social distancing measures, 67% plan to wear masks, and 62% plan to celebrate with no more than 10 people in...
  4. Dean Cathann Kress

    CFAES dean reappointed to Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board

    COLUMBUS—Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine has reappointed Cathann A. Kress, vice president of agricultural administration and dean of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) at The Ohio State University, to the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board. Kress began her first term on the board in 2017. Her new term began on July 31, 2020, and will end on Jan. 25, 2023. “Within the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, we take our land-grant mission seriously and seek to connect our science to issues impacting Ohioans,” said Kress. “I am honored to be reappointed to a board that has a critical role in protecting the welfare of livestock raised in Ohio, and balances scientific knowledge with professional experience and ethical...
  5. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Keeping a lid on Ohio’s newest pest: the spotted lanternfly

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—A group of spotted lanternflies, which feed on grapevines, hops, and fruit trees, was recently discovered in Ohio, triggering concerns the pest could become established and spread quickly. In October, adult lanternflies were found outside a business in Jefferson County, adjacent to the Pennsylvania border. Adult lanternflies won’t be seen during the winter months because they die off as temperatures drop below freezing. But before dying, the females typically lay 30–50 eggs, and come spring, their offspring could begin feeding. “If there’s anything I’m personally losing sleep over, it’s this insect,” said Maria Smith, outreach specialist in grape production at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural,...
  6. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: How to thaw a frozen turkey safely

    I’m making a turkey for the first time because, this year, we’re staying home for Thanksgiving and avoiding our traditional large holiday gathering due to the pandemic. However, as a novice, I’m not sure how to thaw the turkey. What do I do? Good question! It’s very important that you thaw and cook your turkey safely to help avoid developing foodborne illnesses. Thawing a frozen turkey correctly helps minimize the growth of bacteria, which can cause foodborne illnesses. While frozen, a turkey is safe indefinitely. However, as soon as it begins to thaw, any bacteria that might have been present before freezing can begin to grow again, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service. There are three safe ways to thaw a...
  7. (Photo: Ken Chamberlain, CFAES)

    Ohio State soil scientist honored for increasing global food production

    COLUMBUS, Ohio— A world-renowned scientist at The Ohio State University—whose global work to restore soil health, boost food production, and fight climate change has reaped another honor, this one from a Canadian-based institution.  Rattan Lal, Distinguished University Professor of soil science in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), today received an Arrell Global Food Innovation Award. For 52 years, Lal has been adapting methods to restore soil health globally, including helping hundreds of millions of landowners in the developing world. “My source of inspiration has been the challenges farmers of the world face, especially the resource-poor and small landholders. The majority of these are women farmers,” Lal...
  8. Photo: Getty Images

    Advanced planning and budgeting: Key to keeping holiday spending in check

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—With all the expenses that typically occurs during the winter holiday season, avoiding overspending can be hard. In fact, many struggle to stay within normal spending limits during the holidays, often taking months into the next year to pay off the resulting debt. While this has become an annual issue for many consumers, the economic stress many are already dealing with now as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic has caused the issue to take on even more significance this year. Already, some 49 percent of consumers say the pandemic has negatively impacted their holiday budgets, according to the 2020 Holiday Outlook by PwC, formerly Price Waterhouse Coopers. The international accounting firm’s survey of more than 1,000 consumers found that total holiday...
  9. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Pandemic worsening food insecurity

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Bringing higher rates of unemployment and poverty, the pandemic has also pushed more people into a struggle to buy the basics, including food.  Grocery store food prices have gone up only about 5% since January 2019, but with so many people out of work, food banks have seen a surge in demand, said Zoë Plakias, an assistant professor of agricultural, environmental, and development economics at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). While facing an increasing demand, food banks have also received fewer food donations from grocery stores that give their excess products. When stores can’t keep their shelves stocked, there can be less available for donation, Plakias said. With many incomes...
  10. A young girl on a poultry farm in Busia, Kenya. Photo: courtesy of Barbara Kowalcyk

    CFAES food safety center to research food safety in Kenya

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—The Center for Foodborne Illness Research and Prevention (CFI) at The Ohio State University has been awarded a $770,000 grant to improve food safety and prevent foodborne illnesses in Kenya. The initiative is one of four new research projects announced by the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Safety, which is funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development as part of Feed the Future, the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative. The 3.5-year project, “Chakula salama: a risk-based approach to reducing foodborne diseases and increasing production of safe foods in Kenya,” includes a team of researchers from The Ohio State University, the University of Florida, Kenya Medical Research Institute, and the University...

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