News Releases

  1. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Food safety during a power outage

    I’ve got a fridge full of food and our power went out for several hours due to severe storms. Is there any food that can be saved, or do I have to throw everything out of our fridge due to spoilage? It’s that time of year when severe weather can leave consumers without power for a few minutes to multiple days, in some instances. Rounds of severe weather and extreme heat have already impacted many consumers nationwide this spring, with thousands experiencing widespread power outages issues in Ohio and throughout the country.  It’s incredibly frustrating to think you must discard groceries that you’ve just purchased due to a power outage. Understanding the basics of food safety and how perishable foods are impacted when the temperature is 40 degrees...
  2. The U.S produces about 4.5 billion bushels of soybeans every year, but leaf-chewing insects can cause severe crop losses.

    Machine learning helps determine health of soybean fields

    COLUMBUS, Ohio–Using a combination of drones and machine learning techniques, researchers from The Ohio State University have recently developed a novel method for determining crop health and used it to create a new tool that may aid future farmers.  Published in the journal Computers and Electronics in Agriculture, the study investigates using neural networks to help characterize a crop defoliation, or the widespread loss of leaves on a plant. This destruction can be caused by disease, stress, grazing animals, and more often by infestations of insects and other pests. If left unchecked, whole crop fields can end up damaged, drastically lowering an entire region’s agricultural productivity. To combat this, researchers chose to analyze a cash crop considered to...
  3. Stephanie Karhoff named field specialist, agronomic systems at Ohio State

    COLUMBUS, OHIO–Stephanie Karhoff has been hired as the new field specialist, agronomic systems for Ohio State University Extension in The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Karhoff, who previously served as an Extension educator for agriculture and natural resources in Williams County since April 2019, will begin her new position June 1, said Jacqueline Kirby Wilkins, associate dean and director, OSU Extension. “We are extremely pleased to fund this important position, which will work in tandem with our other field specialists in agronomic systems, CFAES research faculty, producers, and our commodity and industry partners to translate and apply the newest university knowledge to meet the timely and most critical...
  4. At Ohio State ATI, Kubota Tech program gives leg up on training and jobs

    WOOSTER, Ohio—Emily Doss’ road to the Kubota Tech College training program, taught at Ohio State ATI, began in her hometown of Oak Hill in southern Ohio. “I started out by going to the vocational school there, taking their ag diesel class,” she says. “I really enjoyed what I did there and was good at it, so I got a job where I work now, at Ricer Equipment, the Kubota dealer where I live.” Seeing her skills and potential, Kubota staff asked if she’d be interested in taking the Kubota Tech College training program, which ATI offers in partnership with the company. Located in Wooster, ATI is part of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Doss jumped at the chance, she said, for two reasons:...
  5. Photo: Getty Images

    CFAES report focuses on ways to expand, enhance rural access to broadband internet in Ohio

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—While most Ohioans have access to broadband internet, nearly 1 million still lack access to the fast, reliable broadband services in their homes, says analysts with the C. William Swank Program in Rural-Urban Policy at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). “This unserved population largely lives in less populated rural regions of the state where it is prohibitively expensive for internet service providers to extend service,” according to Mark Partridge, chair and professor in the CFAES Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics. The Swank program, housed in the department, conducts research, teaching, and outreach within the college. An April report released by...
  6. Photo: Getty Images

    Expect more ticks in Ohio this season and beyond

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Ticks—and the diseases they carry—are on the rise in Ohio this season and will likely continue to increase. While you can encounter a tick during any season, spring marks the beginning of heavy tick season, and this year, the tick population statewide is expected to continue to rise, said Tim McDermott, an educator with Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Global climate change and tick-host range expansion are some reasons for the increase, McDermott said. “Ticks are extraordinarily adaptable and can travel on host animals,” he said. “Ticks expand when their habitat range expands due to global climate change. They take...
  7. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Tick season could result in red meat allergies for some bitten by lone star ticks

    Can some ticks cause you to be allergic to meat? In some cases, yes. Spring marks the beginning of tick season and this year, the tick population is expected to surge.  With it comes the potential for tick bites, which could result in several complications, including Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and in some cases, cause some people to develop an allergy to red meat after being bitten. As mentioned in a previous Chow Line, lone star ticks in certain cases, can cause an allergy to red meat after being bitten by the tick.  This species of tick entered Ohio over the last decade or so. It has since spread throughout the state, although it is more common in southern Ohio, said Tim McDermott, an educator with Ohio State University Extension, the...
  8. Photo: Getty Images

    Majority of CFAES grads report positive job outlook

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ninety-five percent of recent graduates of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences report either having a job or being enrolled in an advanced degree program within six months of graduation. That’s according to a recent survey by school officials that found that of those graduates, 79% reported accepting positions in Ohio, which contributes to the state’s overall economic strength, said Adam Cahill, career development manager for the college. The remaining graduates reported accepting positions in 35 other states, Washington D.C., and two other countries, Cahill said. “The fact that our students have secured positions in multiple states and internationally shows that our programs are well known...
  9. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Tips to save money on groceries

    My grocery bill has risen by nearly $100 a month recently and it’s becoming harder to keep spending so much more than we used to. Do you have any tips on how we can cut our food costs? You are right–the cost of food is up by more than 8% over last year according to government statistics, with prices for foods including meat, chicken fish and eggs have risen at an even higher increase in costs. And prices are expected to continue to rise throughout the year. That’s according to a new report released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Price Outlook for 2022, which says food prices are predicted to increase between 4.5 and 5.5% this year. For example, beef prices are forecast to rise 16.2%, pork 14%, poultry 12.5%, fish 10.4%, eggs 11.4%, fresh fruits...
  10. An Ohio State researcher installs a tap in a maple tree in a woods.

    Tap into something new: 8 things you can learn at Ohio’s upcoming Maple Bootcamp

    MANSFIELD, Ohio—If you’re new or new-ish to making maple syrup, there’s a lot you can learn at Maple Bootcamp: Ohio. Set for June 22–24 at The Ohio State University at Mansfield, the event, its website says, will provide “intensive hands-on training for beginner and intermediate maple producers.”  Participants will get details on how to assess a sugarbush and all the steps that follow, from collecting sap to boiling, bottling, and selling. Classroom sessions will take place on the Ohio State Mansfield campus. Field trips and tours will visit local maple operations, including one located right on the campus.   By the end of the program, participants “will gain the skills necessary for the safe, efficient, and...

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