News Releases

  1. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Canning and Home Food Preservation

    With canning season in swing now, I have some home canning recipes that have been passed down through my family over decades that I want to try. With all the new techniques and information that have been developed regarding home food preservation, can I still use those old recipes? While it’s a wonderful, cherished tradition in many families to preserve food based on recipes that were developed and honed over the years in grandma’s, great-grandma’s and great-great-grandma’s kitchens, you should review those recipes, and if they don’t match recipes that have been tested and researched by food safety experts, you shouldn’t use them. The National Center for Home Food Preservation is a valuable source for current research-based recommendations for...
  2. Photo: Monique Pairis-Garcia

    Ohio State Professor’s New Animal Welfare Designation Shows Compassion, Expertise

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – A veterinarian and assistant professor of animal sciences in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University (CFAES) has been named a Diplomate of the American College of Animal Welfare, the only swine veterinarian in Ohio to earn such a designation. In fact, Monique Pairis-Garcia, who is also an animal welfare specialist with Ohio State University Extension, is the first veterinarian at Ohio State to earn board certification in this relatively new veterinary specialty. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of CFAES. The designation means that Pairis-Garcia can demonstrate detailed knowledge of and special competence in animal welfare across all species. This is significant, considering that the American Veterinary...
  3. Glen Arnold talks with Farm Science Review attendees beside one of the Review's many demonstration plots. (Photo: Ken Chamberlain)

    When Weed Killers Miss Their Mark

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — The field appears as a checkerboard: thriving green crops beside squares of shriveling beige stalks. This was not a farmer’s bad luck. Instead the field was intentionally sprayed with 13 different weed killers to show their effects on various crops as well as the consequences of herbicides that drift from their intended target. “Would a farmer do this to a field? Absolutely not,” said Harold Watters, an agronomy field specialist with Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) at The Ohio State University.  “The purpose is to share what can happen when things don’t go as planned.” For farmers, weeds are more and more of a vexing problem...
  4. The Community Agricultural Rescue Trailer (CART) will be used for rescue simulations on Aug. 29 in Madison County.

    Tips and Events for Week of August 27

    Tip 1: Farming always ranks as one of the most dangerous occupations. This time of year can be especially hazardous with the upcoming harvest and storage of crops. Ohio State University Extension will host two free grain bin safety programs in Madison County Aug. 29, at the county fairground in London. One program is geared to farmers, grain industry employees and farm families, while the second program is for first responders. Both programs will use the grain Community Agricultural Rescue Trailer (CART) for rescue simulations. The on-farm safety program is from 11 a.m.-1 p.m., and the first responders program is 9 a.m.-4 p.m. For more information, contact Mary Griffith, Madison County Extension agriculture and natural resources educator, at griffith.43@osu.edu or 740-852-0975. OSU...
  5. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Antibiotic Resistance: From Animals to People

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — It can be tough to stop using antibiotics on a farm. Farmers need them to prevent and treat diseases in their animals. But increasingly, certain antibiotics used to treat illnesses in farm animals and humans are not working, said Greg Habing, an associate professor in the College of Veterinary Medicine at The Ohio State University. More antibiotics are being used with humans and animals, and with each use, sensitive bacteria are killed and resistant bacteria grow and multiply. Those resistant bacteria can then trigger infections and become tougher for doctors and veterinarians to fight. “The same resistant bacteria are affecting animals and people,” Habing said. “Human use of antibiotics has a bigger effect than agricultural use, but...
  6. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Tips for Dining out Safely

    With the recent reports of people developing foodborne illness after eating at certain restaurants, it’s made me a little worried about eating out. How can I be safe when dining out? Foodborne illnesses have been in the news a lot lately, most recently with the cases of some 650 people who reported becoming ill with gastrointestinal problems after eating at a Chipotle restaurant in Powell, Ohio, last month. It turns out that what made them sick was a toxin produced by bacteria called Clostridium perfringens, according to the Delaware General Health District. While food samples taken from the restaurant tested negative for the bacteria, stool samples collected from sickened customers contained the toxin, the agency said. Clostridium perfringens is a foodborne...
  7. Farm Science Review 2018 will be Sept. 18-20. (Photo: Ken Chamberlain, CFAES)

    Request 2018 Farm Science Review Media Credentials

    This year, Ohio State University’s Farm Science Review celebrates 56 years and includes numerous newsworthy events, exhibits and presentations. Mark your calendars for Sept. 18-20, and be sure to join us at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center near London, Ohio. The annual event is sponsored by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. You’ll need tickets to get in and parking passes for the news media lot, so please fill out the form below and return it via email by Sept. 1. We’ll mail the requested number of admission tickets and parking passes during the first week of September. Send in your request now, so you don’t miss: Talks on diseases that transmit from animals to people and vice versa; hops and barley production;...
  8. Field Day Features Oldest No-Till Fields

    WOOSTER, Ohio – A field day scheduled for Aug. 29 will look at the old and the new in tillage practices. The Ohio No-Till Field Day will feature panelists with a combined 250 years of no-till experience, as well as a tour of the historic Triplett-Van Doren No-Tillage Experimental Plots. It will also include updates on recent research regarding cover crops, soil health, and more. The event takes place on the Wooster campus of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) at The Ohio State University. The Triplett-Van Doren plots, established in 1962, are known as the longest continually maintained no-till research plots in the world. “Long-term research plots are incredibly important because soil can take longer than three to five years to...
  9. Voles and slugs have been dining on some corn and soybean crops across the state, causing some growers and producers to experience crop injuries

    Tips and Events for the Week of August 20

    Tip 1: Voles and slugs have been dining on some corn and soybean crops across the state, causing some growers and producers to experience crop injuries, according to a report published in the latest issue of the Crop Observation and Recommendation Network (C.O.R.N) newsletter, written by agriculture experts from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Evironmental Sciences at The Ohio State University (CFAES). Agronomists with Ohio State University Extension are conducting a survey of farmers to see how widespread the damage has been, writes Greg LaBarge, an agronomic systems field specialist with OSU Extension. LaBarge can be reached at 419-460-0600 or labarge.1@osu.edu. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of CFAES. Tip 2: Whether you think of it as Ohio-State-on-the-Lake, or...
  10. Online Class Improves Workplace Communications With Latinos

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – A new online class can help non-Latino managers of Spanish-speaking employees communicate more clearly with their Latino workers – but not by learning a new language. Claudio Pasian, associate professor in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University, has modified his “Latinos in the Workforce” college credit course for online learners who can take the course at their own speed and on their own timeline. Although the typical American or Latino person does not exist, Pasian’s course assumes certain generalizations about people from different cultures. “We all behave the way we behave because we learned that in our culture. We expect people to react in a certain way. When we interact...

Pages