News Releases

  1. Barbara Kowalcyk

    Ohio State scientist appointed chair of FDA Science Board

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Barbara Kowalcyk, who directs the Center for Foodborne Illness Research and Prevention (CFI) at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), has been appointed chair of the Science Board to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Kowalcyk, who was first appointed to the FDA Science Board in 2013, is faculty with the CFAES Department of Food Science and Technology (FST) and Ohio State’s Translational Data Analytics Institute. Established in 1992, the FDA Science Board advises the federal agency on complex scientific and technical issues and provides input on the agency’s research agenda and on upgrading scientific and research facilities and training opportunities. The board is composed of 21 voting...
  2. Ohio Victory Gardens Program Kicks Off Third Year; Expands to 42 Counties

    REYNOLDSBURG, OH (April 25, 2022) – It’s time once again to get your hands dirty and start growing! The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) and Ohio State University Extension offices are kicking off the third year of the Ohio Victory Gardens program. Due to high demand, the program is expanding to include 42 counties, up from 25 counties last year. Thousands of seed sample kits will be available for free to the public to get people planting. “In the third year of our Victory Gardens program, we are proud of the ground we have covered in reigniting Ohioans’ love for backyard gardening, while lifting people’s spirits and re-teaching an important life skill of growing your own food,” said Dorothy Pelanda, Director of the Ohio Department of Agriculture...
  3. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Spring is a great time to add more fresh spinach to your diet

    I’ve got a lot of fresh spinach from my parents’ garden, and I’m looking for more creative ways to eat it. Do you have any tips? Spinach is in harvest right now, making this a great time to add this vitamin- and mineral-packed plant into your diet. Spinach is a healthy, dark, leafy, green vegetable that is full of protein, calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, folate, fiber, phosphorus, thiamine, and vitamins A, C, and K. Also considered a superfood, spinach, as part of a healthy, balanced diet, is important for skin, hair, and bone health. Additionally, spinach can help improve blood glucose control in people with diabetes, and it lowers the risk of cancer, improves bone health, and can promote digestive regularity. There are three types of spinach, including...
  4. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Reusable containers just one of many ways to pack waste-free lunches

    With Earth Day occurring next week, I’m wanting to do more to benefit the environment. Do you have any tips on how I can pack more sustainable lunches with less waste? There are several ways that you can pack waste-free lunches and save money in the process. For example, one way to spend less on lunch is to grab food to pack that you may already have in your refrigerator or cabinets so that you can stretch your food budget and reduce wasted food in your home, said Laura Stanton, educator, family and consumer sciences, Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). “For example, instead of buying single-use dips and condiments, pack your own from home,...
  5. Photo of a small grain–including wheat–resiliency field trial located at the Northwest Agricultural Research Station in Wood County. Photo: Glen Arnold, OSU Extension.

    Record wheat prices prompt more Ohio farmers to plant wheat this year

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—With wheat prices already hitting a 14-year high this year, more Ohio farmers are now planning to plant more of the grain. The war in Ukraine and its impact on wheat exports is driving wheat to record prices, leading more farmers statewide to consider planting more wheat as a result. That’s according to Laura Lindsey, a field crops expert with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Lindsey, a soybean and small grains specialist with Ohio State University Extension, CFAES’ outreach arm, said she’s already fielded numerous calls, emails, and Twitter messages from farmers statewide wanting to know the feasibility of planting wheat this year and what they can do to take advantage of the record...
  6. Former 4-H Project Green Teacher class

    4-H Project Green Teacher goes hybrid in 2022

    COLUMBUS—4-H Project Green Teacher, a school gardening series for educators, Master Gardener Volunteers, and others interested in school gardening, will return to The Ohio State University Columbus campus June 6–10. The series is designed for those who would like to use gardening as a context for learning with youth, meet resource personnel, and boost their confidence as a garden educator while also providing an opportunity to network with others who are interested in school gardening. “Research has shown that gardening with youth has significant impacts including higher test scores, increased love of learning, better nutrition, and teamwork skills,” said Sue Hogan, Ohio 4-H youth development educator with Ohio State University Extension-Franklin County...
  7. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Grow your own veggies even without access to a garden

    I’d like to grow my own fruits and vegetables so that I can increase my access to fresh, healthy foods. But I live in an apartment and don’t have access to a garden or patio. Any tips on what I can do? First, I want to commend you on seeking innovative ways to add more produce to your diet by choosing to grow your own vegetables. And even though you don’t have access to a plot of land or space in a garden to plant vegetables, you can still grow your own produce indoors using home hydroponics. In fact, home hydroponics is one of the hottest ways for you to grow your own fresh vegetables and herbs indoors, says Tim McDermott, an educator with Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and...
  8. Treasurer Sprague, The Ohio State University Recognize April as National Financial Literacy Month

    OSU Extension offices in 59 counties earn Compass Award recognition for leading financial education efforts COLUMBUS – Ohio Treasurer Robert Sprague and The Ohio State University are recognizing National Financial Literacy Month as an opportunity to shine a light on financial education and empowerment efforts, as well as the importance of developing strong personal finance skills.    “Sound financial education strengthens not only individuals and families, but also the overall economic health of Ohio’s communities,” said Treasurer Sprague. “Financial Literacy Month is a great time to encourage wise fiscal management and applaud the many educators who continue to innovate and promote smart decision-making among our students. The Treasurer’...
  9. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Spring is a good time to increase and diversify your fruit and vegetable intake

    Now that it’s officially spring, I’m looking to add even more fresh fruits and vegetables into my diet. Which fruits and vegetables are in season now? Even though snow flurries are predicted this weekend throughout parts of Ohio, yes, it is indeed spring. And with soon-to-be-warming weather, now is a good time to seek out fresh fruits and vegetables that are even more abundant because they are in season in spring. Rain and bright sunny days make spring a good time to indulge in a wide range of plentiful produce such as asparagus, cabbage, kale, spinach, and strawberries. Not only are these items extremely fresh and flavorful because they’re currently in season, but they’re also widely discounted because of the abundance of supply based on this time of year...
  10. Farm Income Enhancement Program studies accuracy of agricultural baseline

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) long-term agricultural baseline projections give farmers, agribusinesses, and policymakers a 10-year look into the future of farming and global trade. Researchers at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) recently looked at the informativeness and accuracy of these projections, which many rely on when making business and government policy decisions. The Farm Income Enhancement Program studied more than two decades of baseline projections and actual realized values of major agricultural indicators to determine the accuracy of the projections. Examples of indicators included commodity prices, yields, farm income, acres harvested, etc. Their studies focused...

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