News Releases

  1. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Tips to enjoy holiday meals without packing on the pounds

    I’m wondering if you can offer any tips to help me avoid gaining weight but still enjoy the fall and winter holidays? I’ve already gained several pounds while working from home due to COVID-19 and I’m worried that the holidays will cause me to gain even more. With the holidays approaching, many people are concerned about trying to stay healthy while also enjoying all the rich, delicious foods and traditions associated with the many celebrations that are or will be soon occurring through the end of the year. While the issue of maintaining your weight or avoiding weight gain over the holidays is something that many people focus on this time of year, the issue has taken on even more significance for many people this year who’ve already gained weight during the...
  2. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Helping meat workers get used to wearing masks

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—A study done at Ohio meat-processing plants found very few employees were wearing required face masks.  Among the 37 workers interviewed at five meat-processing plants across the state, only nine wore face masks when surveyed at their job sites, according to the study by researchers with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  “What we found is they’re not seeing other people wearing masks, and they’re not seeing the advantage of wearing them,” said Joy Rumble, an assistant professor in CFAES and one of the lead researchers of the study.  The point of the study, done in June and July, was to determine why many meat-processing facility workers don’t wear masks,...
  3. Dean Cathann A. Kress and Patricia Brundige behind a lectern

    Brundige receives Ohio State’s highest honor for giving

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Congratulations to Pat Brundige, whose impactful donations to the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) were recognized recently with The Ohio State University’s highest award for philanthropy. Brundige, the biggest individual benefactor in CFAES’ history, received the Everett D. Reese Medal, the university’s highest honor in recognition of exceptional service in private philanthropy. Her “see a need, fill a need” philosophy has led her to make numerous donations to Ohio State University Extension, particularly Ohio 4-H youth development. Over the years, she has given to the Nationwide & Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, the state 4-H research endowment fund, and camp scholarships for Ohio Military Kids...
  4. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Safe holiday celebrations

    With the COVID-19 pandemic still a major issue in my area, how can I celebrate the holiday season while keeping myself and my family safe? The COVID-19 pandemic is still a major issue in many areas, with the nation reporting more than 100,000 new cases in a day this week. In Ohio, for example, 4,229 new COVID-19 cases were reported Tuesday. With that in mind, health experts have released guidance on how to have safe holiday celebrations in the midst of the pandemic. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has offered recommendations on what people need to know before traveling, hosting, attending parties, or gathering with family and friends during the holiday season. When planning to host a holiday celebration, the CDC says the most important thing is to assess...
  5. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Kale can be a crunchy, healthy snack

    I know that kale is healthy for you, but I’m having a hard time getting my kiddos to eat it. Got any tips? You are correct: Kale is a very nutritious food! It contains vitamins A, C, B6, and K in addition to manganese, calcium, potassium, and iron. Additionally, kale is a low-calorie, nutrient-dense food that is high in antioxidants and rich in brain-healthy nutrients such as lutein, folate, and beta carotene. Research suggests leafy greens such as kale, spinach, and collards can help slow cognitive decline. “Kale is a healthy fall vegetable that can keep growing deep into cold weather,” said Tim McDermott, an educator with Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (...
  6. (Photo: Getty Images)

    COVID-19 spiking in rural Ohio

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—During one of the most significant COVID-19 surges in Ohio, the state’s rural counties have the highest rates of new cases. Counties in northwest Ohio lead the uptick. Putnam County, north of Lima, tops the state's list of counties ranked by the rate of cases reported in mid to late October. Auglaize and Mercer counties are listed second and third. Though state and health officials have required everyone to wear face masks and avoid large gatherings, some have resisted, particularly in rural Ohio, which until October had largely been spared high numbers of COVID-19 cases.  What seems to be a rural-urban divide over mask-wearing can become glaring to Sam Custer when he leaves his home in Darke County and drives about a half...
  7. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Find out what’s in store for farmers in 2021

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Farmers in Ohio and across the Midwest might have reason to be optimistic this year. Prices for soybeans, corn, and wheat have risen in 2020, and total net cash income from farms in the United States is expected to be up this year by 4.5%. That’s partly because of an increase in government payments to farmers. Those payments will make up 32% of this year’s net cash income from all U.S. farms—more than double the portion those payments typically account for, said Ben Brown, an assistant professor of agricultural risk management at the The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  Traditionally, government assistance to farmers has made up about 14% of the annual net cash income from farms...
  8. Spinach under cover in January, ready to harvest. Photo: CFAES

    Chow Line: Grow your own produce year-round in Ohio

    The COVID-19 pandemic has caused me to rethink how I access food, including a push to grow my own food, kind of like a victory garden. Where can I find tips and information on how to grow my own food in Ohio, even in the winter? You aren’t alone in your desire to take more control over your food this year. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused many people to express a desire to grow their own food. In fact, more consumers nationwide are expected to plant gardens this year. For example, online searches for “growing vegetables from scraps” increased 4,650% in March compared the same time last year, according to Google Trends. The good thing about Ohio is that the Buckeye state is a four-season growing environment, said Tim McDermott, an educator with Ohio State...
  9. $100,000 gift to CFAES to support food safety

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—A new endowed fund to support food safety has been established thanks to a $100,000 gift from Bill Marler and Marler Clark LLP PS, The Food Safety Law Firm. The gift, presented to The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) Oct. 1, brings the fund’s total to $169,863 and establishes it as a permanent endowment for The Center for Foodborne Illness Research and Prevention (CFI).  Founded as a nonprofit organization in 2006, CFI brought its 14-year record of protecting public health to CFAES in September 2019. The center, which is now housed within the CFAES Department of Food Science and Technology, has a mission to advance a more scientific, risk-based food safety system that prevents foodborne...
  10. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Farming and parenting—a tough juggling act

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Raising children on a farm might sound idyllic, but in a national study, most farmers with children under 18 said childcare was a challenge. Over two-thirds of first-generation farmers, people who had not grown up on farms, reported struggles with childcare, from finding affordable options nearby to finding providers whose childrearing philosophy matched theirs.  Even multigenerational farmers, many who live near relatives, said childcare’s affordability, availability, or quality was a problem. Just over half of those farmers reported some type of childcare challenge. “This is going to come as a surprise to a lot of people who don’t think childcare is an issue for farmers,” said Shoshanah Inwood, an assistant professor at The Ohio...

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