News Releases

  1. Two 4-Hers with a camera

    Ohio leaders proclaim Ohio 4-H Week

    Ohioans will be seeing green even before St. Patrick’s Day this year as 4-H members, in their official colors of green and white, will celebrate 4-H Week March 8–14 throughout the state. Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine and Lt. Gov. Jon Husted officially proclaimed the seven days as Ohio 4-H Week, with a state proclamation released last week. A number of special activities will help increase public awareness of the Ohio 4-H program. As America’s largest youth development organization, 4-H supports about 6 million children nationwide including nearly 172,000 children in Ohio, where 4-H clubs exist in all 88 counties. Ohio also has the distinction of being the birthplace of 4-H. In 1902, schoolteacher A.B. Graham started a youth program in Clark County, Ohio. Since then,...
  2. Photo: Getty Images

    Media Advisory: Ohio State experts offers new webinar on novel coronavirus

    COLUMBUS, Ohio —Linda Saif, a scientist with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM), has recorded “Coronaviruses: One world, one health, mild and severe, human and animal threats” as part of Ohio State’s Global One Health initiative monthly webinar series. View the webinar at go.osu.edu.saifcovid-19. The coronavirus, COVID-19, is being blamed for at least 3,254 deaths and more than 94,902 confirmed illnesses in some 83 countries since December 2019, with at least 155 cases of coronavirus reported in the United States across at least 15 states. At least 10 people have died as a result of COVID-19 in Washington State and one person...
  3. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Another wetter-than-average spring expected

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Farmers anxiously awaiting spring rain forecasts might want to take several deep breaths and keep their rubber boots ready. Above-average spring rainfall is expected in March, April, and May—which is exactly what happened last year.   However, recent forecasts call for warmer-than-average temperatures in March. If that happens, that could dry up some of the ground moisture, making it manageable for farmers to get into their fields to prep them for planting. How much rain will this spring bring? “It’s impossible to say,” said Aaron Wilson, climate specialist for The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  Time will tell whether the rain levels will rival last year’s...
  4. Ohio 4-Hers

    News tips and events for the week of March 2

    Tip 1: Ohio 4-H Week—Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine and Lt. Gov. Jon Husted have officially proclaimed March 8–14 as Ohio 4-H Week. As America’s largest youth development organization, 4-H supports about 6 million children nationwide including nearly 172,000 children in Ohio, where 4-H clubs exist in all 88 counties. A.B. Graham started a youth program in Clark County, Ohio, in 1902, which is considered the birthplace of Ohio 4-H. Although 4-H originally began as an organization for farm children, today it emphasizes leadership and citizenship skills. Additionally, Ohio 4-H alumni are 10% more likely to have a college degree than their counterparts. To learn more about Ohio 4-H and to interview Ohio 4-H members and/or leadership at both the state and county levels, contact Kirk...
  5. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Eating fewer trans or saturated fats better choice for heart health

    I’m focusing on improving my nutrition as part of my overall health resolutions for this year. Do you have any tips on how to make heart-healthy food choices? February is a good time to focus on healthy food choices and heart health, as the month was designated American Heart Month by former U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1963. As such, health care advocates, including the American Heart Association, take this time every year to promote consumer awareness of hearth health and the impact that foods can have on your health. This is significant considering that heart disease is the No. 1 killer of American consumers. Limiting unhealthy foods and making wise food choices are important parts of developing and maintaining a heart-healthy lifestyle. One way to do that is by...
  6. A detailed look at what's new on the updated nutrition facts label. Photo: FDA

    Chow Line: New nutrition labels reflect more accurate serving sizes

    There seems to be something different about the nutrition label on some of the foods I’ve purchased lately. Did the labels change? Yes. In fact, the nutrition labels on some foods have changed and will soon change on other food products, thanks to new rules instituted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The FDA announced the updated nutrition label design in 2016 as part of an effort to reflect updated scientific findings to help consumers make better-informed decisions about food choices and maintain healthy diets, the government agency said. One of the biggest changes consumers can expect to see is a larger, bolder typeface for both calories and serving sizes. The typeface will be easier for people to see and read. And the serving sizes have been updated to better...
  7. News tips and events for the week of Feb. 24

    Tip 1: Conservation tillage conference—Learn about cover crops, beneficial insects, fertilizer application, and more at the Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference March 3–4 at Ohio Northern University in Ada. Co-sponsored by CFAES, the conference offers numerous talks related to the challenges of low- and no-till crop production. The event’s keynote speaker is Lee Briese, a crop consultant with Centrol Inc., a North Dakota crop consulting firm. For more information, visit ctc.osu.edu.   February 2020 25 Environmental Film Series, Living Soil (importance of soil health to food security, human health, economics, and more; includes interview with CFAES Distinguished University Professor of Soil Science Rattan Lal), 7–8:50 p....
  8. Photo: A transmission electron micrograph of a coronavirus. Courtesy of Linda Saif.

    News tips and events for the week of Feb. 17

    Tip 1: Coronavirus and Global One Health —Linda Saif, a scientist with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM), will present a talk,“Coronaviruses: Global threats to humans and animals,” as part of Ohio State’s Global One Health initiative monthly webinar Feb. 20, from 9-10 a.m. Saif is known nationally and internationally for her work on enteric viruses, including coronaviruses, which affect food-producing animals, wildlife, and humans. Saif is also a member of Ohio State’s Infectious Diseases Institute (IDI), where she is a co-director for the Viruses and Emerging Pathogens Program. She is also  a member of the National...
  9. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Going out for Valentine’s Day? Pay attention to the details when dining out

    With Valentine’s Day falling on a Friday this year, you’re likely to run into a crowd at almost any restaurant you choose to dine in. In fact, Valentine’s Day is the most popular reservation day of the year for most restaurants, according to the National Restaurant Association. For example, consumers plan to spend $4.3 billion on an evening out this year for Valentine’s day, according to the National Retail Federation.  With that in mind, making sure that your food is cooked thoroughly is just one way to protect yourself when eating out at a restaurant, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  In a Feb. 5 posting from the CDC, consumers are advised to follow these suggestions to prevent developing a foodborne illness from a night out to...
  10. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Warning: Coyotes could be watching you

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Increasingly drawn to life in and around cities, coyotes might be losing their tendency to be reclusive and their fear of the neighbors. A researcher with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) is trying to find out: Has city life changed coyotes? Wildlife biologist Stan Gehrt, who has researched coyotes in the Chicago area for the past two decades, recently began a study on the personality of coyotes in Columbus, Cleveland and Cincinnati, in addition to those in Chicago. Gehrt will explore whether coyotes living in or around cities are becoming more bold, and if so, what’s causing the change in their disposition. If these wild urban dwellers have become more audacious, was the change a result of...

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