News Releases

  1. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Black licorice warnings and tips for safe Halloween celebrations

    I heard that eating too much black licorice can cause heart problems. Is that true? In some cases, for some people, yes. With Halloween coming in a couple of weeks and candy sales up 13% this year as compared to this same time last year, according to the National Confectioners Association, it’s a good time to revisit the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s warning regarding black licorice. The FDA warns that people over 40 who eat 2 ounces of black licorice a day for at least two weeks could experience an irregular heart rhythm or arrhythmia that could land them in the hospital. As mentioned in a previous Chow Line, black licorice contains glycyrrhizin, which is the sweetening compound derived from licorice root. The problem is that glycyrrhizin can...
  2. Rattan Lal

    Naming of Ohio State center cements Lal’s legacy

    The legacy of Rattan Lal, one of the world’s top scientists, has been bolstered with the addition of his name to a center at The Ohio State University. The honor was bestowed on Oct. 15, in a virtual ceremony hosted by Ohio State, Nationwide Insurance, and Ohio Farm Bureau. Earlier in the day, Lal received the 50th annual World Food Prize, often referred to as the “Nobel Prize in Food and Agriculture.” Lal serves as Distinguished University Professor at Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and is the founding director of what will now be known as the CFAES Rattan Lal Carbon Management and Sequestration Center (C-MASC). “Although it would be an exception for a current faculty member to be acknowledged with an...
  3. (Photo: Heping Zhu, CFAES)

    A better way to spray

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—By cutting the amount of pesticide that ends up in the air or on the ground, a new high-tech pesticide sprayer can save vineyard, orchard, and nursery growers money while protecting the environment. The “intelligent sprayer” system was first put on the market in spring 2019, but since then it has been upgraded. Now, among other improvements, it can take an inventory of trees or vines by height and width and measure the amount of pesticide sprayed per tree or vine to help growers manage pesticide costs.  Developed by a team led by an agricultural engineer with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), the spray technology can sense the location and structure of the trees or vines it is...
  4. ATI's Robby Frutchey (far left)

    Kubota partnership to aid ATI workforce development

    WOOSTER, Ohio—The prevalent scarlet and gray most often seen at Ohio State ATI is being supplemented with a heavy dose of Kubota orange this fall. Kubota Tractor Corporation is partnering with ATI to establish the Kubota Tech College training program. Students will be trained using high-tech Kubota equipment in areas such as diagnostics, preventative maintenance, and major repair. “The two programs that will be impacted are the power equipment program and hydraulic power and motion control program,” said Robby Frutchey, ATI coordinator for both programs. In the power equipment program, students learn about career preparation, electrical courses, engine diagnostics, mobile heating and air conditioning, welding, and power transmission. Students in the hydraulic...
  5. Rattan Lal

    Lal to speak at Borlaug Dialogue, receive World Food Prize, and be honored by Ohio State

    Rattan Lal, one of the most decorated professors to teach and conduct research at The Ohio State University, will receive the 2020 World Food Prize on Thursday, Oct. 15, during the virtual Borlaug Dialogue streaming from Des Moines, Iowa. That same day, he will also be honored by Ohio State in a virtual ceremony to honor his legacy. The renowned soil scientist and Distinguished University Professor in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) was named recipient of the 50th World Food Prize in June. He will be honored on Thursday, Oct. 15, at the World Food Prize Laureate Award Ceremony, set for 9 to 10 a.m. CDT and 10 to 11 a.m. EDT. The prize includes a prestigious $250,000 cash award and a sculpture by noted artist and designer, Saul Bass. Join...
  6. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Frozen food safety

    We bought some frozen chicken breasts that already have grill marks on them. The grill marks mean the chicken is already cooked, so I can just heat it up in the microwave, right? Not necessarily.  While some frozen foods have the appearance of grill marks, browned breading, or other signs that normally indicate that the foods have been cooked, they can still be raw and need to be fully cooked before eating. It’s best to read the packaging on frozen foods before eating them to make sure you prepare them correctly. Proper preparation is key to avoiding foodborne illnesses from eating raw or undercooked foods that need to be cooked before eating. However, a new study released last week from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service...
  7. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Go outdoors, but watch for ticks

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—With the great outdoors being a popular destination during the pandemic, it’s important to watch out for another potential threat you might not easily see: ticks.  Be on the lookout for them through late fall. The warmest months are the most common times these tiny, blood-sucking bugs pass on diseases. “I always tell people the outdoors is healthy for you. You need to be outdoors,” said Risa Pesapane, an assistant professor with the colleges of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and Veterinary Medicine at The Ohio State University.  Pesapane researches ticks in Ohio. She actually thrives on going through tick-infested areas and collecting ticks, even off of deer shot by hunters. In January,...
  8. Female farmer holding a laptop while standing in front of a tractor

    Farm Science Review draws virtual visitors

    Neither too hot nor rainy, this year’s virtual Farm Science Review allowed viewers to nestle into a recliner or tractor seat to learn about canning soups, butchering meat on the farm, and operating new technology to better manage their crops. This was the 58th annual Farm Science Review, but the first one held solely online because of health concerns. Overall, turnout was a success, FSR manager Nick Zachrich said. The FSR website recorded 40,000 visits, initial statistics show. That figure does not include visitors who were sharing their screens on their devices, Zachrich said. “I do know of teachers who attended sessions and played them live to their class, so we know that one device could realistically have the potential of 20 views,” he said. On social...
  9. A.I. software

    University/industry partnership takes field scouting to the next level

    LONDON, Ohio—It’s no secret that farming has become increasingly high-tech, but a partnership between The Ohio State University and an Ohio agribusiness is taking things even further with new field scouting technology that involves a drone and artificial intelligence (AI). The Molly Caren Agricultural Center, home to the annual Farm Science Review (FSR), is no stranger to implementing new technology and best practices to optimize production and, more importantly, serving as a resource for Ohio and regional producers.  Due to COVID-19 restrictions, FSR 2020 will be a three-day virtual show held Sept. 22–24 at fsr.osu.edu. Although the center is closed to the public, Molly Caren Ag Center farm manager Nate Douridas and his team have been conducting various...
  10. Chow line: Juice or whole fruit?

    Does eating a piece of fruit or squeezing it into a juice to drink offer the same health benefits? No. Even if you take an orange and squeeze fresh orange juice, drinking the juice of the orange doesn’t offer the same health benefits of eating the orange. Fruit juice lacks fiber, an important nutrient found in whole fruit, writes Dan Remley, an educator in family and consumer sciences for Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). “Fiber helps the digestive system, lowers cholesterol, promotes a healthy colon, and lowers blood sugar spikes, just to name a few benefits,” Remley writes in The Juice on Juice, a blog post at the Live Healthy...

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