News Releases

  1. Excessive rain has contributed to a severe dip in the hay inventory across the Midwest. (Photo: CFAES)

    Hay inventory severely low across Midwest

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Excessive rainfall has not only hindered soybean and corn farmers’ attempts to plant, but has contributed to a near record-low level of hay to feed livestock in Ohio and across the Midwest. The hay inventory in Ohio has dipped to the fourth lowest level in the 70 years of reporting inventory, leaving farmers struggling to find ways to keep their animals well fed, said Stan Smith, a program assistant in agriculture and natural resources for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The situation is not much different across the Midwest, where some livestock owners are having to pay much higher prices for animal feed. “We’re...
  2. A day for making the most of manure

    STRASBURG, Ohio—Expect plenty of fertile conversation at Manure Science Review. Designed to share ways to put manure to good use, and to do it while protecting the environment and water quality, the annual event is on Aug. 7 at JIMITA Holsteins, a 400-plus-acre family dairy farm in Strasburg. Strasburg is about 20 miles south of Canton in northeast Ohio. Manure offers nutrients that crops need to grow and can reduce a farmer’s commercial fertilizer costs, said event co-organizer Chris Zoller, educator, agriculture and natural resources, Tuscarawas County office of Ohio State University Extension. “That’s especially important as the margins in agriculture, especially in the dairy economy, have been very tight,” Zoller said. OSU...
  3. Farmer on computer in dairy barn. Photo: Getty Images

    News tips and events for the week of June 24

    Tip 1: The Dairy Margin Coverage Program is a hot topic this week. Experts at The Ohio State University are holding 13 informational meetings with dairy producers throughout the state to explain the intricacies of the new Dairy Margin Coverage (DMC) Program and how to use a new decision tool. DMC is a voluntary federal program that will make payments to farmers when the national average income-over-feed-cost margin falls below a farmer-selected coverage level. Four meetings were held last week to educate dairy producers about enrolling in and choosing to lock in coverage levels in the new program, which was authorized under the 2018 Farm Bill. The last few years have been tough for dairy farmers due to rollercoaster milk margins and loss of some markets. Ohio State’s College of...
  4. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Food safety after a power outage or flood

    I went grocery shopping last week, and the next day, our power went out for several hours due to severe storms. Is there any food that can be saved, or do I have to throw everything out of our fridge due to spoilage? It’s that time of year when severe weather can leave consumers without power for a few minutes to multiple days, in some instances. Rounds of severe weather have already impacted many consumers nationwide this spring, with thousands experiencing widespread power outages and flooding issues in Ohio and throughout the country.  It’s incredibly frustrating to think you have to discard groceries that you’ve just purchased due to a power outage. Understanding the basics of food safety and how perishable foods are impacted when the temperature is 40...
  5. Flooded farmland in southern Ohio. Photo by Sherrie Whaley.

    Media advisory: Ohio State experts available to discuss ongoing rain and its impact on Ohio farmers

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Agronomic and agricultural economic experts at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) are available to discuss the impact the historic rainfall has had on Ohio farmers and to offer some options for farmers going forward. On June 14, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine requested that the U.S. Department of Agriculture issue a disaster designation for Ohio to make assistance available to farmers as they deal with continuing heavy rainfall. Record rainfall through the spring planting season has resulted in flooded and saturated fields that have prevented some Ohio farmers from planting their crops. As of June 17, only 68% of Ohio’s corn crop and 46% of Ohio’s soybean crop had been planted, according to...
  6. (Photo: Getty Images)

    What to do if you can’t plant a cash crop

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Growers who opt not to plant corn or soybeans this year because of consistently wet fields would be best off not leaving those fields bare, according to an expert at The Ohio State University. A bare field is a vulnerable field, subject to losing its valuable, nutrient-rich layer of topsoil because wind can blow the topsoil away and rain can wash it away, said Sarah Noggle, an educator with Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).   And a field without a crop is an open invitation for weeds to take over, making it harder to prevent weeds the next time a crop is planted there, Noggle said. Planting a cover crop such as oats, buckwheat, or cereal rye to have...
  7. (Photo: Ken Chamberlain, CFAES)

    Learn to cope with on-farm hurdles at Farm Science Review 2019

    LONDON, Ohio—There’s no shortage of challenges for farmers these days: delays in planting, low commodity prices, and dwindling amounts of hay to feed farm animals. At a time when farmers might be seeking advice on dealing with those and other obstacles, Farm Science Review 2019 will offer that, plus the latest in farm technology and products. The three-day agricultural trade show from Sept. 17–19 offers educational talks and opportunities to speak one-on-one with experts from The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), which sponsors the annual event at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center near London. “With last fall and this spring being two of the most challenging seasons for farmers in recent history, you...
  8. Photo: Getty Images

    News tips and events for the week of June 17

    Tip 1: Ohio State experts available to discuss ongoing weather issues and the impact on Ohio farmers: On June 14, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine requested that the U.S. Department of Agriculture issue a disaster designation for Ohio to make assistance available to farmers as they deal with continuing heavy rainfall. Record rainfall through the spring planting season has resulted in flooded and saturated fields that have prevented some Ohio farmers from planting crops. As of June 17, only 68% of Ohio’s corn crops and 46% of Ohio’s soybean crops had been planted, according to USDA Crop Progress reports. Agronomy experts at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) are available to discuss the impact the rain has had on farmers...
  9. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: FDA warns of Hepatitis A with certain frozen blackberries

    I just heard the recent health warning advising people about the concern with a brand of frozen blackberries and hepatitis A. How is it possible that frozen berries could be contaminated with the virus? Hepatitis A virus is a highly contagious virus that infects a person’s liver. It can be easily spread through close contact with a person who has hepatitis A or by eating food prepared by a person with hepatitis A. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a recent warning alerting consumers that some frozen blackberries branded by the Kroger Co. as “Private Selection” were found to be contaminated with the hepatitis A virus. The Kroger Co. issued a recall on June 7 for the following Private Selection items: Frozen Triple Berry Medley, 48-ounce...
  10. More rain in the forecast for the next couple of weeks could further delay or prevent planting. (Photo: Ken Chamberlain, CFAES)

    Many Ohio acres likely to be left unplanted

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—To plant or not to plant. It’s becoming a bit easier for some farmers to decide between the two, with each day that the growing season progresses and forecasts for rain continue. The last 12 months have been the wettest on record in Ohio, and that has put farmers across the state so far behind in planting corn and soybeans that some are deciding to not plant and to file an insurance claim instead. Only 50% of Ohio’s corn crop and 32% of its soybean crop were planted by June 9, according to a report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The delay in planting adds an extra layer of strain on farmers already facing low prices for corn and soybeans, low animal feed supplies, and uncertainty about trade relief aid. For those who haven’t...

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