News Releases

  1. (Photo: Getty Images)

    News tips and events for the week of April 29

    Tip 1: Spurring economic development in Ohio: Challenges and opportunities for economic development in Ohio is the topic of the May 8 Spring and Policy Outlook Conference sponsored by the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics in The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Talks include “Food and Agriculture as Ingredients of Economic Development” by Zoë Plakias, an assistant professor in CFAES and “Does an Urbanizing World Still Need Rural America?” by Mark Partridge, professor in CFAES and Swank Chair in Rural-Urban Policy. The free event is open to the public. For more information, visit: go.osu.edu/springoutlook Tip 2: Harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie’s central basin:...
  2. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Drinking more water can mean less calories for some kids

    I’m trying to incorporate more water into my kids’ daily meals. What are some ways to encourage them to drink more water? According to a new study released this week in JAMA Pediatrics, drinking more water and fewer sugary drinks is associated with lower caloric intake in kids, teens, and young adults. The study, which was released Monday, was based on data collected from 8,400 youths ages 2–19 nationwide. The data was reported in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveysfrom 2011–2012 and from 2015–2016. The youths reported whether they drank water daily, and they reported the number of sugar-sweetened beverages they routinely drank. The study found that about one in five of those youths said they didn’t drink...
  3. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Rural Ohio gaining jobs

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Since 2010, job growth in Ohio’s rural areas has been strong, nearly comparable to the growth in the state’s major cities, according to an economist at The Ohio State University. Between 2010 and 2017, only six states had better rural job growth than Ohio, said Mark Partridge, an economics professor at Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). “As long as this economic expansion continues, rural Ohio is going to fare pretty well compared to the rest of the U.S.,” Partridge said. Between 2010 and 2018, Ohio’s nonmetropolitan areas with populations less than 50,000 and not within commuting distance of major cities had a 7.6% increase in the number of jobs—nearly 10 times the...
  4. Dead ash trees fell near a trail at the Glen Helen Nature Preserve in Yellow Springs, Oh. (Photo: CFAES)

    Beware of falling ash trees

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Ash trees, some dead for years, are increasingly falling in Ohio, spurred by fungi feeding off of what the emerald ash borer has left behind. First seen in Ohio in 2003, the emerald ash borer, an invasive beetle originally from Asia, has since killed off swaths of trees across the state and much of eastern North America, but some of those trees have remained standing for years. Enter phase two of the problem. Various fungi, including one called turkey tail, have been slowly consuming what’s left of the dead trees, in some cases destabilizing the trees. Add some wind, and the dead trees come down. “We expected this to happen,” said Joe Boggs, an entomologist with Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of The Ohio State University...
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    Ohio’s urban school districts outperforming rural ones

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Even with higher rates of poverty in Ohio’s major cities, urban school districts are outperforming rural districts, a recent study by The Ohio State University shows. Rural schools, particularly in Appalachia, tend to have lower average test scores than schools in urban areas, despite city districts having higher poverty rates and a larger proportion of students with limited English proficiency, said Mark Partridge, a professor at Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and one of the study’s authors. On average, school districts with more minority students and more poverty require additional money to achieve the same academic standards as districts with larger shares of white and affluent student...
  6. A plastic bottle and a landfill

    News tips and events for the week of April 22

    Tip 1: Keeping plastic out of landfills with a biodegradable replacement: Companies looking to shrink their environmental footprint are already showing interest in new research from The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  Almost all plastics—about 90%—are petroleum-based and not biodegradable, a major environmental concern. A CFAES research team reports success with a rubber-toughened product that could perform like conventional plastic and is much stronger. Beyond packaged foods, a bioplastic could also be used in other food-related applications such as utensils and cutting boards. Read more about the research here or contact Yael Vodovotz, professor of food science and technology, and director of the Center...
  7. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Hard-boiled eggs safer choice than soft-boiled eggs for Easter

    I prefer the texture of soft-boiled eggs versus hard-boiled eggs. Is it OK to use soft-boiled eggs for dyeing Easter eggs? Well, that really depends on whether you plan to eat the Easter eggs or just use them for decoration. Eggs are an important source of protein and are delicious to eat. However, they must be handled safely to prevent the chance of contracting a foodborne illness. While it’s understandable that some people prefer the taste of soft-boiled eggs versus hard-boiled eggs, from a food safety standpoint, it is safer to use hard-boiled eggs for dyeing Easter eggs that you plan to eat. In fact, you should cook the eggs until both the yolk and the white are firm, not runny. This is because eggs can contain salmonella, which is an organism that causes foodborne...
  8. Secrest Arboretum to host plant sale, open house

    Update, May 2, 2019: Secrest Arboretum has posted hyperlinks to the plant sale lists at go.osu.edu/CuGg.  WOOSTER, Ohio—A cardinal has been pecking at the windows of the new but not yet open Secrest Arboretum Welcome and Education Center. “It wants to be the first one in,” Jason Veil, curator of the arboretum in Wooster, said with a laugh. With spring unfolding around them, Veil, his staff, and arboretum volunteers are preparing for two big events on May 11. There’s an open house slated at the welcome center, which is the public’s first chance to tour the $2 million facility. And there’s the annual Plant Discovery Day plant sale, which will be at the center, too. The open house is a “chance...
  9. Noted ‘green’ polymer scientist joins CFAES

    WOOSTER, Ohio—Polymer scientist Judit E. Puskas, who coinvented the coating on a heart stent implanted in millions of Americans, has joined The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Puskas, who is also developing an innovative way to improve breast reconstruction after cancer surgery, was appointed a professor in CFAES’ Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering at the start of the year. A native of Hungary, she worked most recently at The University of Akron. She will be based at the CFAES Wooster campus, where she will specialize in green polymer chemistry and biomaterials. She will also be a member of Ohio State’s newly created Sustainability Institute....
  10. (Photo: Getty Images)

    An invisible fence for cattle?

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Controlling where the cattle roam may soon get a whole lot easier. Animal science researchers with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) will be testing a virtual fence for cows and other livestock this summer. It’s akin to an invisible fence for a dog, triggering a harmless but attention-getting shock if the animal crosses an unseen boundary. “It’s not a sharp pain. It’s like a mild punch,” said Anthony Parker, a professor of animal sciences and one of the CFAES researchers who will test the virtual fence. Each cow or other animal will wear a smart collar guided by GPS. Then, using a device called eShepherd, the farmer will be able to remotely monitor the animals’...

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