News Releases

  1. A flooded field in southwestern Wayne County illustrates the challenge for a lot of Ohio farmers anxious to plant: excessive rainfall. (Photo: Ken Chamberlain, CFAES)

    Ohio’s record rainfall leaving some farmers on the sidelines

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—During the wettest yearlong period in Ohio on record, the state is lagging the furthest behind in planting corn and soybeans compared to all states that plant the crops, according to experts from The Ohio State University and federal reports. From June 1, 2018, to May 31, 2019, average rainfall across Ohio totaled 52 inches, which is about 10 inches above the mean for that period in the last decade, said Aaron Wilson, climate specialist for Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). “We’ve had very wet soils for a very long time,” Wilson said. As a result, only 50% of Ohio’s corn crop and 32% of its soybean crop was planted by June 9, a report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows. By...
  2. Tomato plants grown in an aquaponics system, which combines fish aquaculture with hydroponics to cultivate plants in water under artificial lighting. Photo: Getty Images.

    Sustainable agriculture in Ohio featured in statewide farm tour

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Interested in learning how to use yellow perch to grow aquaponic produce sustainably? Ohio State University’s Sustainable Agriculture Team will host 10 tours this spring, summer and fall on sustainable organic specialty crops, year-round gardening, cut flowers, raising livestock, aquaponic produce and yellow perch farming and urban agriculture, as part of the 2019 Ohio Sustainable Farm Tour and Workshop Series. The series is an opportunity for growers and other interested people to both learn and experience what sustainable agriculture is all about from farmers and producers who are working in this field daily, said Mike Hogan, an Ohio State University Extension educator who is also the coordinator of Ohio State’s Sustainable Agriculture Team....
  3. A new CFAES report details regulations across the United States aimed at preventing harmful algal blooms in waterways. (Photo: Getty Images)

    News tips and events for the week of June 10

    Reducing fertilizer runoff into waterways across the United States: A new report details laws across the United States intended to decrease the amount of key nutrients in fertilizer from entering streams, lakes, and rivers. The report was written by Peggy Hall, agricultural and resource law field specialist for The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environment Sciences (CFAES), and Ellen Essman, a CFAES research associate. In addition to examining laws, the report also describes measures that various states have taken to encourage farmers to voluntarily participate in practices that reduce the amount of nitrogen or phosphorus, both critical ingredients in fertilizer, from leaving the farm fields on which they were applied. Excessive nitrogen and phosphorus in water...
  4. Chow Line: FDA supports standard language to help avoid food label confusion

    I recently went shopping and bought a bag of salad that says “best if used by June 14” on the packaging, a carton of milk that says “sell by June 17,” and a package of eggs that says “use by June 20.” I’m confused by what all these different dates mean. Those food label dates are confusing to many people—more than a third of consumers throw away food once the date on the label has passed because they mistakenly think the date is an indicator of food safety, according to a 2017 study by the Harvard University Food Law and Policy Clinic and the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future. But for most foods, the date label is a manufacturer’s best guess as to how long the product will be at its peak quality. With only a few...
  5. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Taxes on farmland dropping steadily

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Taxes, on average, are going down for owners of farmland across Ohio and are expected to decline at an even faster rate beginning in 2020, a study by researchers with The Ohio State University shows. The average value of agricultural land across the state has dropped by a third since a recent change in how the state calculates taxes for farmland owners, according to a study by Robert Dinterman and Ani Katchova, two agricultural economists with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Starting in 2020, farmland values in the state likely will drop by another one-third, said Dinterman, a postdoctoral researcher with CFAES. With values going down, owners of agricultural land in the state should see similar declines in their taxes....
  6. News tips and events for the week of June 3

    Tip 1: Ohio State student farm: Some Ohio State students are spending their summer helping fight hunger. Working at the 4-acre Ohio State Student Farm, located at CFAES’ Waterman Agricultural and Natural Resources Laboratory in Columbus, the students are growing more than 30 varieties of fruits and vegetables, are learning about and practicing urban farming, and are donating some of what they grow to local food security efforts. Read more about the farm in “Crops for change” on our CFAES Stories website, go.osu.edu/CyXd, and on the farm’s website at go.osu.edu/CyXb. Tip 2: Cicadas emerging in parts of Ohio: Millions of 17-year cicadas are emerging in Stark, Trumbull, Jefferson, Mahoning, and Columbiana counties in northeast Ohio. The big,...
  7. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Save time and money by making food at home

    I’d like to feed my family more home-cooked meals, but sometimes after a long day at work, it’s easier to stop at a restaurant for takeout. Do you have tips about how to better optimize my time for making dinner at home?  First, you can take some measure of comfort in knowing that your household isn’t the only one that seems to be spending more money on takeout rather than cooking at home.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2015, the average household spent an average of $3,008 per year on dining out. That number has increased over the past couple of years, with the average household spending $3,154 on food away from home in 2016, and $3,365 in 2017. However, if you want to lessen the amount of money your household spends on takeout...
  8. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Northeast Ohio hosts millions of cicadas

    A brood of cicadas that slumbered underground for nearly 17 years has emerged in northeast Ohio crawling, flying, and hitting buildings and trees. While above ground, the bugs will eat a little, mate a lot, then die. The 17-year cicadas arrive in the millions and though they’re distinct from locusts, by the sheer number of them you might think you’re experiencing one of the 10 Biblical plagues. “Some people are creeped out,” said Eric Barrett, an assistant professor and Ohio State University Extension educator in Mahoning County. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The early sightings of this brood of 17-year cicadas in Ohio have been in five counties:...
  9. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Improperly cooked hamburgers on the grill could make your Memorial Day memorable

    We plan to grill this weekend for Memorial Day but my husband and I can’t seem to agree on how to cook the hamburgers. I like them medium rare like a steak, but my husband says the burgers should be cooked until they are well done. Which one of us is right? Unlike steaks, hamburgers, and any ground beef meals, should be cooked until they reach an internal temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit to help lessen your chance of developing a foodborne illness, said Sanja Ilic, the state food safety specialist for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  Even though beef steak and ground beef are both beef, steak can be safe to eat at a minimum internal...
  10. Photo: Getty Images

    Media Advisory: Ohio State expert available to speak about relationship between cancer and diet

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—An expert in nutrition and how foods play a role in disease prevention from The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) is available to discuss with the media about the relationship between cancer and diet in light of the recently released study on the issue. A study published May 22 in the JNCI Cancer Spectrum found that an estimated 80,110 new cancer cases among adults 20 and older in the United States in 2015 were associated with eating a poor diet. The study evaluated seven dietary factors: a low intake of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and dairy products; and a high intake of processed meats, red meats, and sugary beverages such as soda. The study also found that low whole-grain consumption...

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