News Releases

  1. Rattan Lal

    Lal to speak at Borlaug Dialogue, receive World Food Prize, and be honored by Ohio State

    Rattan Lal, one of the most decorated professors to teach and conduct research at The Ohio State University, will receive the 2020 World Food Prize on Thursday, Oct. 15, during the virtual Borlaug Dialogue streaming from Des Moines, Iowa. That same day, he will also be honored by Ohio State in a virtual ceremony to honor his legacy. The renowned soil scientist and Distinguished University Professor in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) was named recipient of the 50th World Food Prize in June. He will be honored on Thursday, Oct. 15, at the World Food Prize Laureate Award Ceremony, set for 9 to 10 a.m. CDT and 10 to 11 a.m. EDT. The prize includes a prestigious $250,000 cash award and a sculpture by noted artist and designer, Saul Bass. Join...
  2. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Frozen food safety

    We bought some frozen chicken breasts that already have grill marks on them. The grill marks mean the chicken is already cooked, so I can just heat it up in the microwave, right? Not necessarily.  While some frozen foods have the appearance of grill marks, browned breading, or other signs that normally indicate that the foods have been cooked, they can still be raw and need to be fully cooked before eating. It’s best to read the packaging on frozen foods before eating them to make sure you prepare them correctly. Proper preparation is key to avoiding foodborne illnesses from eating raw or undercooked foods that need to be cooked before eating. However, a new study released last week from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service...
  3. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Go outdoors, but watch for ticks

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—With the great outdoors being a popular destination during the pandemic, it’s important to watch out for another potential threat you might not easily see: ticks.  Be on the lookout for them through late fall. The warmest months are the most common times these tiny, blood-sucking bugs pass on diseases. “I always tell people the outdoors is healthy for you. You need to be outdoors,” said Risa Pesapane, an assistant professor with the colleges of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and Veterinary Medicine at The Ohio State University.  Pesapane researches ticks in Ohio. She actually thrives on going through tick-infested areas and collecting ticks, even off of deer shot by hunters. In January,...
  4. Female farmer holding a laptop while standing in front of a tractor

    Farm Science Review draws virtual visitors

    Neither too hot nor rainy, this year’s virtual Farm Science Review allowed viewers to nestle into a recliner or tractor seat to learn about canning soups, butchering meat on the farm, and operating new technology to better manage their crops. This was the 58th annual Farm Science Review, but the first one held solely online because of health concerns. Overall, turnout was a success, FSR manager Nick Zachrich said. The FSR website recorded 40,000 visits, initial statistics show. That figure does not include visitors who were sharing their screens on their devices, Zachrich said. “I do know of teachers who attended sessions and played them live to their class, so we know that one device could realistically have the potential of 20 views,” he said. On social...
  5. A.I. software

    University/industry partnership takes field scouting to the next level

    LONDON, Ohio—It’s no secret that farming has become increasingly high-tech, but a partnership between The Ohio State University and an Ohio agribusiness is taking things even further with new field scouting technology that involves a drone and artificial intelligence (AI). The Molly Caren Agricultural Center, home to the annual Farm Science Review (FSR), is no stranger to implementing new technology and best practices to optimize production and, more importantly, serving as a resource for Ohio and regional producers.  Due to COVID-19 restrictions, FSR 2020 will be a three-day virtual show held Sept. 22–24 at fsr.osu.edu. Although the center is closed to the public, Molly Caren Ag Center farm manager Nate Douridas and his team have been conducting various...
  6. Chow line: Juice or whole fruit?

    Does eating a piece of fruit or squeezing it into a juice to drink offer the same health benefits? No. Even if you take an orange and squeeze fresh orange juice, drinking the juice of the orange doesn’t offer the same health benefits of eating the orange. Fruit juice lacks fiber, an important nutrient found in whole fruit, writes Dan Remley, an educator in family and consumer sciences for Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). “Fiber helps the digestive system, lowers cholesterol, promotes a healthy colon, and lowers blood sugar spikes, just to name a few benefits,” Remley writes in The Juice on Juice, a blog post at the Live Healthy...
  7. CFAES Students

    Learn how to become a Buckeye and CFAES student during Farm Science Review Online

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—If you’re hoping to be a future Buckeye on The Ohio State University’s Columbus or Wooster campus, you’ll want to catch the virtual sessions offered Sept. 22–24 as part of Farm Science Review. For the first time in its almost 60-year history, FSR will not be held in person due to the COVID-19 pandemic. By visiting this page, prospective students can learn virtually what it takes to be admitted to Ohio State and how to make the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) their academic home. An admissions overview for the Columbus campus will be offered on Tuesday, Sept. 22, from 9:30 to 10:15 a.m., followed by a student panel addressing “The dollars and cents of paying for college” from 10:30 to 11:15...
  8. A tablet showing FSR content held by someone in a flower patch.

    Your guide to virtual Farm Science Review

    Find a comfortable seat and charge your device. Farm Science Review is being held online this year because of COVID-19 concerns. Although the Molly Caren Agricultural Center is closed to the public, you’ll be able to learn the latest agricultural technology and helpful farming techniques from more than 400 exhibitors—all for free on your laptop, tablet, or smartphone. More than 200 free livestreamed and recorded talks and demos will be available online. You will have to provide your own steakburgers, milkshakes, or other FSR fare, though. To access the content for this year’s show, Sept. 22–24, start at fsr.osu.edu. Some videos and other content will be available before the show begins. From inside a large scarlet banner at the top of the FSR homepage...
  9. Fall produce. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: Fall a great time for apples, peaches, blueberries, in addition to pumpkins

    I know that autumn means pumpkins will be available in abundance, but what other produce is in season in the fall? You are correct: This is the time of year when you will start to see pumpkins, squash, and gourds—which are all part of the Cucurbitaceae family—for sale in grocery aisles, farmers markets, and farms. But fall is also a good time to buy grapes, apples, watermelons, potatoes, berries, zucchini, yellow squash, and peaches, among many other seasonal fruits and vegetables. In fact, those are some of the commodities that many grocery stores are now starting to promote heavily at discounted prices in their grocery aisles, according to the Sept. 4 edition of the National Retail Report, a weekly roundup of advertised retail pricing information compiled by...
  10. Farm Science Review will hold live online sessions September 22-24. Photo: Getty Images.

    Supply chain, U.S. trade policy, COVID-19 to be discussed during Farm Science Review

    LONDON, Ohio—The U.S. trade policy, labor and immigration issues, agricultural commodity markets, and the food supply chain will be among the topics addressed at a panel discussion during the 59th annual Farm Science Review Sept. 22–24 at fsr.osu.edu.  The previously titled Tobin Talk, now The Talk on Friday Avenue, “Value Chains in Food and Agriculture,” on Sept. 22 at 10 a.m. at fsr.osu.edu, will feature comments from a panel of agricultural economists from The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).  The Talk on Friday Avenue is among a series of presentations at Farm Science Review to address topics relevant to the agricultural industry, from controlling weeds and managing beef cattle to...

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