News Releases

  1. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Vitamin D and COVID-19

    My wife heard that vitamin D can help with symptoms of COVID-19. Is that true? Your question is on the minds of many consumers, as more people have been reaching for vitamin supplements to boost their immune system amid the coronavirus pandemic. Vitamin D, which plays a wide variety of roles in boosting the immune system, is one of those supplements that has seen increased sales in recent weeks.  It helps the body absorb calcium, which builds strong bones and prevents osteoporosis. Vitamin D’s effect is significant: If you don’t get enough, your body absorbs only 10% to 15% of the calcium you consume. With vitamin D, absorption jumps to 30% to 40%. In addition, muscles, nerves, the immune system, and many other bodily functions all require vitamin D to do...
  2. Rattan Lal has pioneered agricultural methods across the globe that enrich soil and enhance crop yields. (Photo: Ken Chamberlain, CFAES)

    Ohio State soil scientist awarded World Food Prize

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—A soil scientist at The Ohio State University whose research spans four continents was just awarded this year’s World Food Prize for increasing the global food supply by helping small farmers improve their soil.   Over five decades, Rattan Lal, a Distinguished University Professor in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), has reduced hunger by pioneering agricultural methods across the globe that not only restore degraded soil but also reduce global warming. “Every year we are astounded by the quality of nominations for the Prize, but Dr. Lal’s stellar work on management and conservation of agriculture’s most cherished natural resource, the soil, set him apart,” said Gebisa Ejeta, chair...
  3. Tiny white larvae in a strawberry caused by spotted wing drosophila. Photo courtesy of Hannah Burrack, North Carolina State University, Bugwood.org.

    Chow Line: A tiny worm in your strawberry won’t hurt you

    I just saw a viral video that shows little tiny worms coming out of a strawberry soaking in salt water. Is that real or a prank? Can I get sick from eating strawberries if they do have worms? Many people in recent weeks have been surprised to learn that yes, sometimes fresh produce can contain small pest infestations that, while may sound gross to some, really aren’t harmful for consumers.  In fact, there is a strong likelihood that you’ve already unknowingly consumed a tiny worm or insect or two during your lifetime.  The Food and Drug Administration has guidelines for how many bugs or how much mold is allowed in each type of food. Using what the FDA calls food defects standards, the agency sets the maximum levels of natural or unavoidable defects that...
  4. Photo: Getty Images

    Ohio State offers tips for vendors, consumers when shopping at farmers markets amid COVID-19

    COLUMBUS, Ohio— At this year’s farmers markets, you’ll find Ohio farmers selling the fresh foods you’re used to buying. However, there won’t be any farm-fresh food samples to taste, and the music and children’s activities that typically accompany the markets will likely be canceled. Ohio farmers markets, farm markets, and you-pick operations want you to know they are open, they’re taking precautions to keep consumers safe from COVID-19, and they’re fully stocked with locally grown and produced foods.  Although the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted growers, local farmers, and livestock producers, these groups are continuing to plant, harvest, and market foods directly to the public, said Shoshanah Inwood, assistant professor of...
  5. (Photo: Getty Images)

    New federal funds available for farmers

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Good news for farmers dismayed by a drop in prices and demand for what they produce. New federal payments will be issued to eligible farmers to help offset lower demand and prices for their produce, grain crops, milk, and livestock as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.                                  Producers of cattle, hogs, specialty crops, corn, soybeans, and other agricultural goods can apply for the payments through Aug. 28 at their local Farm Service Agency Center. The funding is related to losses farmers have experienced during the first six months of this year. Market prices for...
  6. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: Canning expected to be big this year amid COVID-19

    I’m growing my own produce this year since I’ve got time on my hands due to the pandemic. I want to be able to store the foods that I grow and don’t immediately use, but I have no idea how to get started. Do you know of any resources? Home food preservation is expected to be very popular this year, as many people such as yourself have taken on several kinds of new hobbies to pass time while staying home during quarantine.  Temporary business closures due to stay-at-home orders have also resulted in more people turning to gardening, whether due to a fear of food supply chain disruptions or a desire to have more control over the foods they eat. Nationwide, more consumers are expected to plant gardens this year. For example, online searches for “growing...
  7. Kris Boone

    $500,000 gift transforms Ohio State ATI’s engineering tech program and helps students in emergencies

    A recent $500,000 gift helps Ohio State ATI provide a competitive advantage to students, faculty, and staff through experiential learning with the most up-to-date engineering technology. The gift, made by an anonymous donor, creates three new current-use funds for the Department of Engineering Technology at ATI, the associate-degree-granting academic unit within The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. In addition, the donation significantly boosts an existing fund that aids students with financial crises. This resource is even more crucial during the hardships of the COVID-19 pandemic. “The bulk of this gift is supportive of our engineering technologies. That is a tremendous career field,” ATI Director Kris Boone said....
  8. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow Line: After the flood

    My home was flooded, impacting food I had stored in cabinets, my pantry, and my fridge. As my home dries out, what do I do with the food? Many Ohioans have experienced similar problems recently as heavy rains, flash floods, and flooding have caused water-soaked homes and businesses, and evacuation situations across the state. Because your question is very similar to others that were asked in previous “Chow Line” columns, it’s best answered by reissuing a combination of those columns here. If your home becomes flooded, it is important to throw away any food that might have come into contact with floodwater. That includes cartons of milk, juice, or eggs, and any raw vegetables and fruits. In fact, unless they were in a waterproof container, any foods in your...
  9. Wedding in the OSU Wooster amphitheater.

    Ohio State’s Wooster campus venues offers “new normal” virtual services

    WOOSTER—Have you ever attended a virtual wedding? If not, you may soon receive an invitation as part of the “new normal” world that we now live in. The COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated changes to in-person gatherings ranging from employee meetings and trainings to annual conferences and yes, even weddings. Event venues on The Ohio State University’s Wooster campus are offering additional services to make virtual events easy to hold. Nine campus venues, all part of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), are available throughout the year for a variety of Ohio events and meetings. “We are pleased to announce that, in addition to our offerings of in-person gatherings, we also have the technologies to...
  10. Muskingum County 4-H counselors meet using Zoom to plan Not a Camp. Photo: Ohio 4-H.

    Ohio 4-H adapts to serve youth amid pandemic

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Ohio 4-H camp has been called “the best week of summer.” It’s all about tie-dyeing T-shirts, learning new line dances, singing around a campfire, cool counselors, and sharing a cabin with your new best friends. But how can camp happen in the era of COVID-19?  Virtually. “The decision to cancel Ohio 4-H camps this summer was not an easy one,” said Hannah Epley, interim associate state 4-H leader and Ohio State University Extension specialist for camping and older youth.  Ohio 4-H, the youth development program of OSU Extension, which is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), annually offers or sponsors 4-H camps to youth in all 88 of Ohio’s...

Pages