News Releases

  1. (Photo: Getty Images)

    News tips and events for the week of Feb. 10

    Tip 1: Sowing Seeds of Success—Anyone just starting out in farming or interested in doing so could learn some basics about raising produce, managing livestock, and how to market their products, at the March 14 Small Farm Conference and Trade Show at The Ohio State University at Mansfield. Sponsored by Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), the event will include talks on growing produce in greenhouses, timber harvesting, fencing for livestock and raising hops, hemp, and barley. Anyone unsure about how to make a sufficient profit on just a few acres of land or how to raise or market produce could gain some helpful advice from attending this daylong conference. For more information, visit go.osu.edu/osufarmconference2020. Tip 2:...
  2. Photo: Getty Images

    Chow line: The difference between broth and stock

    My dad asked me to pick up chicken stock from the store for a meal that he wants to make for dinner. When I got to the store, I bought chicken broth and brought it home. He sent me back to the store because he said stock and broth aren’t the same thing. But aren’t they really? No, they are not.  Your dad is correct. There is a difference between broth and stock, and depending on which recipe he was making, the difference between the two could have an impact on the outcome of the meal. This is because, generally speaking, broth is lighter and more flavorful, while stock is thicker. To understand the difference, it’s important to understand what stocks and broths are. Stocks and broths are liquids used to make sauces, soups, stews, and other recipes. The...
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    Fighting the flu: how to protect yourself and your herd

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—While many choose to arm themselves against the flu virus with a vaccine, it is even more important for those who work around animals to protect themselves.   Influenza affects a wide range of animals, and flu among pigs poses a serious threat to people because flu in other livestock is not as transferable to people.  “The vast majority of influenza viruses circulating in pigs today has actually come from people,” said Andrew Bowman, associate professor in the Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine at The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM).   This is likely because producers or farmers sometimes go into the barn while they are feeling under the weather and are infected with the influenza virus...
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    Burned out caring for someone? Attend this workshop

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—As people age and some become disabled, they may need a caregiver, and while that role can be fulfilling, it also can be exhausting and sometimes isolating. Anyone who cares for another likely has experienced the stress and possibly the feelings of helplessness that can come with taking care of an ailing person. To help caregivers through the many hurdles, The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) is co-hosting a workshop on Feb. 22. The workshop is for people who care for someone who is disabled or sick, adult children concerned about aging parents, as well as those who work for long-term care facilities. “Caregiving can be very meaningful work. And it’s also really hard work, ” said...
  5. CFAES testimony at House hearing: Technology can benefit rural America

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—New technology holds promise for America’s small farms and rural businesses, but public-sector involvement—such as for expanding rural broadband access—is needed for that promise to be realized.  So said Doug Jackson-Smith, professor of water security and rural sociology in The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), in comments delivered Jan. 9 in Washington, D.C., to the U.S. House Committee on Small Business’ Subcommittee on Innovation and Workforce Development. “New technology offers opportunities for small businesses, especially small farmers,” Jackson-Smith said at a hearing convened by the subcommittee titled “Farming in the 21st Century:...
  6. A hemp field

    News tips and events for the week of Feb. 3

    Tip 1: An update on hemp production and marketing—Growing hemp continues to be of wide interest throughout Ohio. Two educators with Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), will present a hemp production and marketing opportunities workshop on Monday, Feb. 17, from 7–8:30 p.m., at the Kunz-Brundige Franklin County Extension Building, 2548 Carmack Road, on the Ohio State Columbus campus. Topics will include an Ohio hemp production update, legal and business issues related to hemp production, and agronomic requirements of hemp. Admission is free and no RSVP is required. Speakers will include Lee Beers, a Trumbull County Extension educator, and Peggy Kirk Hall, an...
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    Chow Line: Super-safe food for Super Bowl Sunday

    We’re hosting a Super Bowl feast this weekend. Got any tips about how to do so safely?  You’re not alone. Super Bowl Sunday is the second largest food consumption day of the year, second only to Thanksgiving, according to the National Chicken Council. There are several steps you can take to ensure that your guests enjoy the game and the delicious foods you’re serving while not walking away from the buffet with a nasty case of food poisoning. Because your question is very similar to another that was asked in a “Chow Line” column from January 2017, it’s best answered by reissuing that column here.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers several tips to help ensure that your guests have a good meal without the fear of food...
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    Ohio hemp growers: Tread slowly

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Got a hankering to grow hemp? Consider the gamble: The crop could generate hundreds, even thousands, of dollars per acre. Or, quite possibly, nothing at all. The market price for CBD oil, which is derived from hemp flowers, has declined recently because of an oversupply on the market. Farmers in some states are awaiting payment for hemp they grew but could not sell. Some other growers are finding it can be very easy for hemp to exceed the legal limit of 0.3% THC; when this happens, the plants must be destroyed.   “Don’t jump in,” said Peggy Hall, an agricultural and resource law field specialist for Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (...
  9. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Taking the pulse of Ohio farmers

    COLUMBUS, Ohio—Extreme weather, trade tensions, declining prices, lack of access to health care, and urban sprawl. To get a better handle on how Ohio farm families are adapting to these challenges, researchers at The Ohio State University will be asking farmers to share their experiences through a new statewide survey this February. The 2020 Ohio Farm Poll will gather information about the current well-being of different types of farmers across the state, including any changes they might be seeing. The questionnaire will provide an opportunity for farmers to share their views with researchers at Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and state policymakers about a range of issues. The survey will be mailed in early February to a...
  10. Photo: A transmission electron micrograph of a coronavirus. Courtesy of Linda Saif.

    News tips and events for the week of Jan. 27

    Tip 1: Ohio State experts available for comment on new coronavirus—Scientists with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) can offer insight into the new coronavirus that is being blamed for at least 81 deaths and more than 2,800 confirmed illnesses internationally since December 2019, with at least five cases of coronavirus reported in the United States—in Washington state; Arizona; Los Angeles; Chicago; and Orange County, California. Additionally, at least 100 other people in the United States are under observation in 26 states, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that include the...

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